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The development of leadership among indigenous Seventh-day Adventists in Australia has met with varying degrees of success throughout the history of the Church in the country.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church has a global identity based on its fundamental beliefs, organizational and administrative system, and missionary vision. At the same time, Adventists seek to contextualize the Adventist message to make it understandable and relevant to local context.

India is a richly diverse community, inclosing a diverse range of ethnic groups, each, not just different, but on occasion quite the opposite.

The outbreak of World War I in 1914 in Europe negatively impacted Adventist missionary activities in British East Africa and specifically South Kavirondo, the birthplace of the Adventist Church in Kenya. Almost as soon as hostilities broke out in Europe, they also began in British East Africa. The British were primarily at war with Germany, and it happened that their colonial holdings in British East Africa (Kenya) and German East Africa (Tanganyika) shared a very long and largely porous border.

​​The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Kenya was preceded by other Christian denominations, which include the Church of Scotland Mission, Church Missionary Society, Africa Inland Mission, and the Roman Catholic Missions. Having been introduced in Kenya for the first time in Nyanza in 1906, it was not until 1933 that Adventism became active in Central Kenya at Karura. The Karura Station first reported to Kisumu, where the headquarters of the East African Union was from 1943 to 1949.1 Later, due to expansion of the work outside Nyanza, the headquarters was relocated to Nairobi in 1950. Nairobi remained the headquarters of the Adventist Church in Kenya until it was reorganized into two unions so that the second union had its headquarters returned to Kisumu.

​Samburu is a semi-arid county in northern Kenya primarily inhabited by the Samburu and Turkana people. The strong Samburu culture presented serious challenges to the spread of the Christian faith with some of the early missionaries making very few converts.

​The Adventist faith first came to Western Kenya through the work of a South African settler farmer named David Sparrow and his wife Sallie who settled among the Nandi people in 1911.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Kenya operates a number of guest houses, canteens, and a resort. Unlike what is common elsewhere in Kenya, the Adventist hospitality business promotes healthy living through vegetarian cuisines and healthy lifestyles. The main Adventist hospitality facilities are the Adventist LMS Guest House and Conference Center, Watamu Adventist Beach Resort, and Adventist Guest House, Eldoret.

Adventist Bible scholars and administrators have repeatedly been invited to participate in Bible translation, revision, edition, or education projects of several national Bible societies in Western Europe over the past 40 years.

​Following the government restrictions on the activities of Adventists in Nandi, Kenya, between 1932 and 1963, the Adventists there relied on the Missionary Volunteer Societies to make up for the absence of formal Adventist schools in the region.

The development of indigenous Adventist music in Ghana dates from 1922, the year in which the Agona Seventh-day Adventist Singing Band was organized in Agona-Ashanti led by one Mr. Tenkorang. It was the first indigenous singing group in Adventist circles that used the indigenous language of the Akan people, Twi, in their singing. The formation of this singing band drew its inspiration from the Methodist Church which already had singing bands that assisted in its evangelistic efforts.

​One of the most effective methods of conveying Seventh-day Adventist teachings in the early decades of the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s growth in the Caribbean was the pioneering of early Adventist songs and hymns. Music has always been an effective vehicle to transmit ideas and ideologies. Early colporteurs and ministers both taught their first contacts and interested people the early Adventist music that they had learned from their mentors. The early Adventists who viewed themselves as “a singing people” had memorized numerous songs about their beliefs, which they shared with new converts.

Witchcraft is generally perceived to be an integral element of the African worldview and cultural practices. This continues to be the case, to some extent, even in the modern Zambian culture and society.

​Wherever the Adventist message has been preached in Tanzania, it has collided with African traditional practices. For Adventists, the Bible is the standard that guides their life practices of life, while traditional practices are the foundation of African life.

African Traditional Religion is the indigenous religion of the African people. It expresses the beliefs and practices that regulate the mentality and views of the African cosmology whose worldview locates an individual’s place in the wider universe. Further, it is the totality of the way people live life within the interaction of persons, events, objects, and natural phenomena.

Burials are cultural events with religious undertones among many tribes in Kenya, and traditions associated with these events present several issues for Adventist believers there.

Braid patterns and hairstyles are an indication of a person's tribe or community, age, and marital status in many African cultures. Some Christians question whether braiding is compatible with biblical Christian lifestyle.

​Jita is a tribe located around Mount Masita in the eastern side of Lake Victoria in Tanzania. The name Jita was adopted based on the location of Mount Masita. The colonial governors from Germany could not pronounce Masita; instead, they called it Majita. They put in writing the word Majita, and therefore it became the name for these people. Since then the whole area is called Majita.

​Levirate marriage is still practiced among the various African tribes in including, in Tanzania, the Luo, Pare, Hehe, Sukuma tribes. The unique struggles of the Adventist Church in its endeavors to evangelize these groups is discussed in this article.

The Luo are a Nilotic ethnic group that is spread out in East and Central Africa. Most of them inhabit the shores and the environs of Lake Victoria in Kenya and Tanzania. Adventism among the Luo of Kenya is over a century old, tracing its roots to the missionary activities of Arthur Carscallen and Peter Nyambo, who arrived at Kendu Bay in the eastern shores of Lake Victoria in November 1906.