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Showing 21 – 40 of 72

The Luo are a Nilotic ethnic group that is spread out in East and Central Africa. Most of them inhabit the shores and the environs of Lake Victoria in Kenya and Tanzania. Adventism among the Luo of Kenya is over a century old, tracing its roots to the missionary activities of Arthur Carscallen and Peter Nyambo, who arrived at Kendu Bay in the eastern shores of Lake Victoria in November 1906.

​The Maasai people live in the southern part of Kenya and northern part of Tanzania in east Africa. It is estimated that one million Maasai people live in Kenya and Tanzania, although most Maasai doubt these numbers. Many Maasai see the national census as government meddling and often miscount their numbers to census takers. This tribe is well known for being strong in preserving its culture.

The Adventist Church in Kenya survived numerous trials during the Mau Mau uprising (1952-1960).

Australasian Division income during the depression was remarkable in the face of widespread adversity. Any progress made by the church during the worst years was in sharp contrast to numerous bankruptcies and business failures in the secular world.

The close proximity of Australia to Southeast Asia naturally led union conference officials in Australia to adopt responsibility for the establishment of Seventh-day Adventist missions in that region, first in Sumatra, then Singapore, followed by the Philippine Islands and Java.

During the first half of the twentieth century at least three families from the Mona Mona SDA Mission for Indigenous Australians were sent as missionaries to Papua.

​This article examines the history of the development of baptismal vows in concept, word, and usage throughout the history of the Seventh-day Adventist Church—from early references in Adventist publications and letters to current, official baptismal vows found in church manuals.

The Black Unions debate (1969-1980) concerned the wishes of the leadership of eight regional conferences of the North American Division in existence at that time to organize into two newly-created union conferences.

​Even though the blood pact is not to be encouraged and is not practiced now as in the past, the concept of blood covenant has helped some in African cultures, particularly in Rwanda, to understand the Christian message.

Bullock-Cart Theology pursued a theology that was truly Indian while trying to preserve the core of the Adventist message at the same time.

The cargo cult is a combination of native beliefs or animism and Christianity whose manifestations were present in the Philippines, West Irian, and throughout Melanesia.

Seventh-day Adventist pastor Michael Chamberlain and his wife Lindy suffered one of the most notorious cases of miscarriage of justice in Australian legal history. They lost their baby daughter Azaria to a dingo at Uluru, Norther Territory in August 1980.

The Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) message arrived in the Caribbean between the late 1880s-early 1890s. This essay seeks to explain why, notwithstanding the prejudices of the state and the established churches, SDA members managed to establish a foothold in the Anglophone Caribbean.

The Adventist Church in Colonial Kenya made its mark in Education, Healthcare, and Publishing, and all of them created jobs for many Africans. The Church was criticized by early nationalists for actively dissuading them from the clamor for independence.

This article covers the history of the gradual change from hostility towards creeds to appreciation for statements of belief as well as why this change occurred within the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The development of statements of belief will also be chronicled and examined.

​There are many anomalies around the alignment of the days of the week with the international date line. This continues to cause concern for Seventh-day Adventists and their worship on the seventh day of the week.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church was named in 1860 and organized as a denomination at Battle Creek Michigan in 1863.

​The eastern Caribbean comprised of the numerous Leeward and Windward Islands, were among the early places outside of the U.S.A. that Seventh-day Adventist missionaries labored in significant numbers, for around eighty years. “The English-speaking regions of the Caribbean were the first to attract Adventist workers.”

This article provides the ratio of Adventist tunes composed by native composers and native Adventists and suggests possible reasons for such ratio.

​Among the cultural practices of Rwanda, there are several that can be useful to missionaries introducing the gospel. They can create a connection between local culture and the gospel. However, instead of adapting these common practices in Rwanda, some missionaries in the past branded them devilish and lost valuable opportunities to connect with the local people.