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Showing 1 – 9 of 9

George Hillry Akers was a lifelong educator and administrator for the Seventh-day Adventist educational system.

The Association of Seventh-day Adventist Librarians (ASDAL) is an international organization for individuals interested in SDA librarianship.

​Willard Allan Colcord was an editor and religious liberty advocate.

M. Bessie DeGraw (Sutherland) devoted her distinguished teaching career to furthering Adventist educational reform. She became part of the progressive program of Edward A. Sutherland early in her career and worked closely with him for the next 60 years, becoming his wife during his last year of life. As a young educator, she became inspired both by Ellen White's calls for educational reform and the educational philosophy and programs of Booker T. Washington and Hollis Burke Frissell.

Fletcher Academy is a co-educational college preparatory high school. Although independently managed and operated by Fletcher Academy, Inc., the school is closely affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist church. Fletcher Academy, Inc. also owns and manages Captain Gilmer Christian School, Fletcher Park Inn, and the Lelia Patterson Center—a fitness and aquatics facility.

Cassius Boone Hughes was a missionary and educator in North America, Australia and Jamaica.

​Benjamin Franklin Machlan was a teacher, academy principal, and college president of several institutions.

Ozark Adventist Academy is a fully accredited Seventh-day Adventist coeducational boarding academy in northwest Arkansas, owned and operated by the Arkansas-Louisiana Conference. It lies in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains beside Flint Creek about two miles southwest of Gentry and six miles northeast of Siloam Springs.

​Sheyenne River Academy (SRA) was established in 1903 on 160 acres of property donated by the citizens of Harvey, North Dakota. The instructions were to “build a school to accommodate at least fifty pupils and operate it for a minimum of five years.”