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Showing 61 – 80 of 117

The Middle Russian Mission was one of the three church units into which the Russian Mission was divided in 1901. Since it covered vast territory, it was a temporary church unit, which disappeared as it continued to be subdivided. It was dissolved c. 1920.

Moldova Union of Churches Conference (MUC) is a part of the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It was organized in 2008. Its headquarters is in Chisinau, Moldova.

Moscow Conference is a part of the West Russian Union Conference in the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It was organized in 2003 and reorganized in 2007. Its headquarters is in Moscow, Russian Federation.

Mikhail Mikhailovich and Olga Vladimirovna Murga were prominent figures in the Adventist movement in Russia and the Ukraine.

​Vilis Stanislavovich Neikurs served as a pastor and church administrator in the former Soviet Union, Ukraine, and Russia for over 45 years.

Neva Conference was a European Russian church unit that operated from 1913 to 1928.

The North Caucasian Conference was a church unit that operated from 1912 to at least 1926.

North Caucasus Mission is a part of the Caucasus Union Mission in the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It was organized in 2001, and its territory was reorganized in 2017. Its headquarters is in Mineralnye Vody, Stavropol Territory, Russian Federation.

The North Russian Mission was a church unit in the expanding early stages of Adventist work in Russia, when the entire Russian Empire was divided into only three fields: the Northern, Middle, and South Russian Missions. It operated from 1901 to 1907.

Formerly the Northern Kazakhstan Conference, the Northern Kazakhstan Mission is a church unit that comprises most of Kazakhstan. Currently it covers Astana city, and Akmola, Aktyubinsk, Atyrau, Karaganda, Kostanai, Mangistau, and Pavlodar, in the Northern and Western regions of Kazakhstan. Its headquarters are in Astana, Kazakhstan.

​Northwestern Conference was organized in 1994. It is a part of West Russian Union Conference in the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. Its headquarters is in Saint Petersburg; Russian Federation.

The Polish Mission was a church unit that comprised Congress Poland from 1912 to about 1920.

Karl Alexandrovich Reifschneider was a pioneer missionary, pastor, and administrator who worked in Latvia, Estonia, Poland, and Russia.

The German colonists in Bessarabia (Moldova) distributed Adventist tracts, thus facilitating the spread of the Adventist message in this territory. In the summer of 1894, H. J. Löbsack visited, by invitation, settlements Neuburg near Odessa and Tarutino in Bessarabia where some of the Baptist brethren began to celebrate the Sabbath.

​Pavel Rodionov was a Russian by birth and a mission pioneer in Manchuria and Mongolia. In 1949 he transferred to Australia as the first Seventh-day Adventist minister to nurture any of the many groups who had migrated from Europe to Australia after the Second World War. He established the Russian church in Sydney before his premature passing.

Rostov-Kalmykia Conference is a part of the Caucasus Union Mission in the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It was organized in 2001. Its headquarters is in Rostov-on-Don, Russian Federation.

​Russia is a country in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia, which for most of the twentieth century was part of the communist Soviet Union. Today, aside from other Christians, the Seventh-day Adventist Church has a small representation in the country.

The Russian Mission was the first Russian church unit. It operated from 1890 to 1901, when it was divided into the North Russian Mission, Middle Russian Mission, and South Russian Conference.

The Russian Union Conference was a church unit that comprised the Russian Empire from 1908 to 1913, excluding Finland, and Siberia after 1911.

Iosif (Jȃzeps) Aleksandrovich Seniavski contributed to the development of the Seventh-day Adventist work in Moldova.