Browse Articles

Show

sorted by: Title or Division

in

Only show articles:

Where category is

Where title begins with

Where location is in

Where title text includes

Where translation is available in

View list of unfinished articles

Hide advanced options -


Showing 81 – 100 of 117

The Siberian Mission was a church unit that covered all of Siberia from 1909 to 1910, after which it became the Siberian Union Mission with its subfields.

The South Russian Conference was a church unit for Germans in southeastern Russia that operated from 1901 to 1905.

The South Russian Conference covered the territory in the Russian Empire that today is southeastern Ukraine and the North Caucasus. It operated from 1908 to 1912.

The Southern Conference was a church unit in Southern Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan that operated from 1994 to 2000.

The Southern Conference covers several Russian cities from Belgorod, which is near the Ukraine border, to Voronezh, in the southwestern part of Russia.

The Southern Kazakstan Mission was formerly known as the Southern Kazakhstan Conference. It was organized in 2000 and reorganized in 2010.

The Southern Union Mission is a part of the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. Organized in 1990 and reorganized in 1994, 2010, and 2012, it has its headquarters in Almaty; Kazakhstan.

Pavel Afanasievich Sviridov was a pastor, church administrator, and editor from Russia.

During the 1930s, the exiled German Adventists further organized the first Adventist congregation. The Russian Adventists appeared in Tajikistan in 1931. The pioneers included the families of Pavel Zhukov (born in 1905) and Vasiliy Borisov (born in 1896), who were exiled from Transcaucasia. They were followed by other exiled Adventists.

The Tajikistan Mission was organized in 2002 and changed to a field in 2012.

The First World War was a serious trial both for all Russian people and for the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Russia. The war greatly complicated interchurch relationships because at that time most of the leaders and members of the church were German, and the Russian people identified them with Germany. Due to the collapse of the transportation system, supervision of the congregations scattered all over the vast territory of the Russian Empire became difficult. Still, World War I with its trials and troubles increased the people’s religious feelings, pushing many of them to seek protection and refuge in God. Statistics show that, during the war, church membership numbers did not diminish.

​The article uses extant sources to examine the almost undocumented travails of the SDA Church in the Soviet Union during the World War II (1939-1945).

The Source of Life Publishing House (SOLPH) was established in 1991 and became the first Protestant publishing house in the territory of the former USSR with its own printing facilities.

The Trans-Caucasian Mission was a church unit in the Caucasus that operated from 1912 to sometime after 1930.

A short overview of Bible translations in the USSR and Russia, including the translation prepared by the Zaoksky Bible Translation Institute, which took twenty-two years, from 1993 to 2015, to complete and the involvement of translators from many different Christian denominations.

The Turkestan Mission was a church unit in Central Asia that operated from 1909 to 1925, when it became the Central Asian Conference.

Turkmenistan is a country situated in Central Asia and washed in the west by the Caspian Sea. The first official data about members of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in Central Asia appeared in the published reports of Russian Union for the second quarter of 1908 and mentioned a company of Seventh-day Adventists in the city of Ashkhabad consisting of six members.

The Turkmenistan Field is a Central Asian church unit that comprises Turkmenistan. It was organized in 2002.

Several unofficial Adventist educational centers were organized during the Soviet regime, because the government officials denied the Adventist church an opportunity to train future ministers. Such centers were, among other places, in Rostov-on-Don, under the leadership of J. J. Wilson, and Kyiv, under the leadership of I.A. Lvov.

The Ural Conference is part of the West Russian Union Conference of the Euro-Asia Division. The Ural Conference was organized in 1994. Its headquarters is in Yekaterinburg, Russian Federation.