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Showing 21 – 40 of 516

​Joseph Harry Anderson was a world class artist and illustrator whose work included widely-admired paintings for the Adventist church.

​W. H. Anderson was a leading pioneer of Adventist mission to the indigenous peoples of southern Africa. His achievements and his ability to communicate passion for mission did much to generate interest among American Adventists in the church’s nascent work on the African continent.

​Hattie Andre was a missionary, Bible teacher, and educational leader influential in the formative years of three Adventist institutions of higher learning.

​A pioneer writer and scholar-evangelist, John Nevins Andrews exercised wide influence in the early Seventh-day Adventist church serving alongside James and Ellen White and Joseph Bates as one of the inner circle of leaders involved in founding the movement. He held a variety of important leadership positions including General Conference president, editor of the Review and Herald, and local conference president. He also served as a long-term member of the General Conference Executive Committee.

​The Apples of Gold Library was a series of small pamphlets designed to be enclosed with personal correspondence.

Arizona Conference Corporation is a church administrative unit in the Pacific Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

The Arkansas-Louisiana Conference is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Southwestern Union Conference.

​Frank Benjamin Armitage was an Adventist minister and missionary in Africa.

Mary Mortensen Tripp Armitage was a Bible worker, foster mother to Ellen White’s granddaughters, and pioneer missionary to Africa.

For more than twenty years Nathaniel Edward Ashby served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a dedicated schoolteacher, college professor, registrar, residential dean, and principal.

​Ned Sullivan Ashton’s 48-year long service began as a pastor and ended as a pastor of both small and large churches in North American Division. In between he was an academy Bible teacher, conference and union president, leading the church through difficult years of growth with organizational and social challenges.

The Association of Seventh-day Adventist Librarians (ASDAL) is an international organization for individuals interested in SDA librarianship.

The Atlantic Conference, though short-lived (1889-1901), fostered the early development of Seventh-day Adventist work in the large cities on the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States. It was parent to the Chesapeake, Greater New York, and New Jersey Conferences.

David Caldwell Babcock was an evangelist, conference administrator and pioneer missionary to Guyana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Curaçao.

John F. Bahler, whose role in the Texas Tract and Missionary Society contributed to the organization of the Texas Conference, was born in Switzerland in 1840. He emigrated with his parents to Rochester, New York, at age five.

Alfred Sherman DePuy Baird was an architect who supervised construction of buildings for denominational institutions in Michigan and Washington, D.C.

Joseph Baker, an ordained Methodist minister who joined the Millerite movement around 1843, was for a few years prominent in the early development of Sabbatarian Adventism.

W. L. H. Baker was an evangelist, conference administrator, and Bible teacher in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, and recipient of a letter from Ellen G. White that has figured prominently in the varying explanations of the human nature of Christ debated within Adventism.

Warren St. Clair Banfield was a prominent black Seventh-day Adventist minister, church administrator, and civil rights activist.

​Edwin E. Barnes, organist, choir director, composer, and singer with a sonorous bass voice, was a pioneer in early Seventh-day Adventist music education and hymnody. He was born in Shirley, Southampton, England, on March 15, 1864, the son of Samuel and Sarah Barnes.