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Showing 61 – 78 of 78

​Seoul Adventist Hospital (aka Sahmyook Seoul byeongwon) is a medical missionary organization under the Korean Union Conference. It is located at 82 Mangu-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, as of the end of 2020. The hospital has 119 doctors, 371 nurses, and 531 other employees, with a total of 1,021 people.

The Seoul Adventist Hospital Orphanage was a social welfare institution operated by the Seoul Adventist Hospital under the name Seongyuk-won. Started in 1951 during the Korean War by Mrs. Grace Rue, wife of Dr. George H. Rue, it operated until 1981. Located at 200 Sangbong-ri, Guri-myeon, Yangju-gun, Gyeonggi-do (currently: Sangbong-dong, Jungnang-gu, Seoul), it also operated elementary and middle schools.

Seventh-day Adventist Language School is a specialized language education institution that operates foreign language curriculums such as English, Chinese, and Japanese, and is a special missionary institution that expands the kingdom of God through educational work. The project, which began in 1969, has achieved remarkable growth over the past 50 years with the development of the Korean society, contributing greatly to the missionary expansion of the Korean Adventist Church.

The Chinese Signs of the Times Publishing Association, located in Taipei, Taiwan, is the only official Chinese publishing house of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in China.

William R. Smith and his wife, Addie, were the first Korean Adventist missionary couple to be sent to Korea from the General Assembly, and were faithful leaders of the Korean Church with Williams serving as a pastor, educator, and administrator while serving as missionaries for 20 years.

Heung-Cho Sohn was the first Korean Adventist to be baptized in Japan along with Eung-Hyun Lee, who laid the foundation for the Korean Adventist Church.

Soonan Academy (Korean Industrial School) was the first secondary education institution in the Korean Adventist Church and was established in Soonan, Pyeongannam-do, in 1909 and operated by the Adventist Church until 1937. This academy was converted to a public school in 1937 and left the Korean Adventist Church’s Institution.

The earliest Adventist medical institution in Korea opened in 1908 at Soonan, a town about ten miles north of Pyongyang, the present capital of North Korea. It was operated by the Chosen Union Mission until World War II, but after the war, its control was taken over by the government of North Korea. Soonan hospital was also the predecessor of Seoul Adventist Hospital.

The Southeast Korean Conference (aka Yungnamhaphoe) is one of the five belonging to the Korean Union Conference of the Northern Asia-Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Southwest Korean Conference is one of the five conferences of the Korean Union Conference in the Northern Asia-Pacific Division. It was established as a mission in 1952 and was promoted to the conference in 1983. Southwest Korean Conference is headquartered in Gwangju Metropolitan.

​Taiwan Adventist Hospital, located in Songshan District, Taipei, Taiwan, and operated by the Northern Asia-Pacific Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, is the only Adventist hospital in the territory of the Taiwan Conference.

Rufus and Theodora Wangerin were a missionary couple who led the missionary work of the Korean Adventist Church in the early days.

Ralph S. Watts (aka. Ryunsnag Won) and Mildred (aka. Myeongryun Won) served as missionaries in Korea for a total of 17 years, including Ralph’s tenure as superintendent of the Chosen Union Mission just before and after the nation’s liberation from Japanese colonial rule.

West Central Korean Conference (aka Seojunghanhaphoe) is one of the five units comprising the Korean Union Conference of the Northern Asia-Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists. First named the Central Chosen Mission when the Chosen Union Mission was formed in 1919, then reorganized as the West Central Korean Mission in 1978, and it was elevated to the West Central Korean Conference in 1983.

Cecil A. Williams and his wife, Amanda Wilma, have served as missionaries in Korea for 18 years. He served as the secretary and director of the Publishing Department, the Mission Department, the Relief Service Association, and the Religious Liberty Department of the Korean Union Mission (KUM). He also served as the president of the KUM for six years until he left for the Okinawa Mission in Japan.

Nathaniel Yen was among the group of about a dozen Taiwanese young people who became the first-generation ministers and church leaders in the Taiwan Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. He served as the president of the South China Island Union Mission from 1991 to 1998.

Yeosu Sanitarium and Hospital (aka. Yeosu Yoyang Byungwon) is a nursing hospital established in 1996 to take care of the physical, mental, social, and spiritual health of patients through natural treatment that incorporates the health principles of the Adventist faith. The hospital, run by the Korean Union Conference, is located at 204-32, Jangsu-ro, Hwayang-myeon, Yeosu-si, Jeollanam-do.

Yujawon is a senior sanitarium facility operated by the Seoul Adventist Hospital and was opened on March 3, 2008, after constructing a sanitarium center with the support of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Yujawon is equipped with facilities such as a medical room, a physical therapy room, a rehabilitation program room, and an inpatient room that can accommodate 120 patients, and provides complex services such as medical, nursing, social, and psychology.