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Showing 281 – 300 of 670

​Dr. Howard James pioneered the establishment of the Adelaide Sanitarium in South Australia in 1908 and then the Warburton Sanitarium in Victoria in 1914.

​Norman Jeffes was instrumental in developing Weet-Bix, the famous breakfast biscuit now manufactured and marketed by the Sanitarium Health Food Company. Norman and Ivy Jeffes were involved in many aspects of church activity in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Bertram Olaf Johanson held management positions in the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s (SDA) Sanitarium Health Food Company (SHF) for over thirty years, and at retirement was the Assistant Secretary of the Health Food Department of the Australasian Division (now the South Pacific Division, [SPD]) of the General Conference of the SDA church.

​Pastor Johan Johanson held a range of pastoral and administrative positions in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Australia, including manager of the Signs Publishing Company; principal of the Australasian Missionary College; president of union missions in Japan, Korea, and Manchuria; and manager of the Australasian Conference Association.

Walter Johanson worked for the Seventh-day Adventist Church for thirty years, working in finance and management. The last nine years of his working life were spent as the manager of the Signs Publishing Company in Warburton, Victoria, Australia.

Captain Griffith Francis Jones, and his wife, Marion, were pioneer missionaries in Singapore, the Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, New Britain, and Gibraltar.

Alfred Stanley Jorgensen was a teacher, preacher, and writer from Australia.

Harold George Josephs was an evangelist, pastor, and educational administrator. Harold and Olive Josephs were missionaries to India.

Joyful Tidings was a periodical published by Avondale Press from 1900 to 1902.

​Bernard and Emma Judge served the Seventh-day Adventist Church in their homeland Australia and as early missionaries to Sumatra and Java.

When Griffiths Jones first sailed the Advent Herald into the Marovo Lagoon in 1914, Jugha and his brother, Pana, were the first to speak to Jones and direct him to their chief. When Jones established a little school at Sasaghana the first class included Jugha. He was also among the first group to be baptised, January 1, 1918.

Kabiufa Adventist Secondary School is located on the Highlands Highway, 10 km (6.2 mi) north of Goroka, in the Eastern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea. It offers all levels of secondary education. It is an institution of the Papua New Guinea Union Mission in the South Pacific Division.

Aisake Laisenia Kabukeinadave was a pioneering Fijian pastor, evangelist, administrator, and radio speaker between 1953 and 1994.

Kambubu Adventist Secondary School is a coeducational boarding secondary school in Papua New Guinea. It was established in 1950.

Karalundi Aboriginal Education Centre is located in the desert, northeast of Meekathara, Western Australia. It commenced classes in September 1954.

Kasterita Hospital, located at Inus on the island of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea, operated from the 1950s until 2014.

Kauma Adventist High School is the main Seventh-day Adventist educational institution in the Republic of Kiribati. It is situated on the Kauma estate, a strip of some 35 acres of land spanning the half-mile from the lagoon to the ocean on the north-east section of the atoll. The co-educational high school offers education from years six to twelve, drawing its students from across the Kiribati group. In 2018 it had an enrollment of almost 200 students and a teaching staff of 21.

​Born in New Zealand, John Keith entered the ministry of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1937 in Victoria, Australia. He later became a union president in two unions in the Australasian Division.

​James William Kent, a Seventh-day Adventist pastor and evangelist in Australia and New Zealand, pioneered inner-city evangelism. In his eighties, Kent championed the rebuttal of the “new theology” promoted by Desmond Ford.

Wilfred Kilroy was a career length employee at Sanitarium Health Food Company (SHF) with headquarters in Australia. He gave 48 years of service.