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Showing 301 – 320 of 669

​Kioto was among the first group of Solomon Islanders to be baptized as Seventh-day Adventists in the Solomon Islands. He was largely responsible for initiating the work of the Church on Choiseul Island, Western Solomon Islands.

Kiribati, officially the Republic of Kiribati, is a sovereign state in Oceania. Kiribati straddles the equator in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The first Sabbath schools were officially established in the late 1940s, and the first Seventh-day Adventist church in 1954.

The Kiribati Mission is a small mission in the territory of the Trans Pacific Union Mission of the South Pacific Division of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

​New Zealand born Henry Kirk served as a teacher in mathematics at the Australasian Missionary College in New South Wales, Australia. For a brief time in the early 1920s he held the position of principal at the college and later became principal of New Zealand Missionary College at Longburn.

Arthur Lyndon (Lyn) Knight was the founding member of the Association of Business and Professional Men, the driving force behind the journal Adventist Professional; founder of the Avondale College Foundation; fundraiser for Sydney Adventist Hospital; and pioneer of the “Carols by Candle” light program in Sydney as both the coordinator of the program and conductor of the choirs and orchestras.

​Arthur William Knight was the first Tract Society secretary in North Zealand Conference. He was appointed the first leader of the literature ministry in India, Burma (Myanmar) and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

​Frank Knight was born in 1890 on New Zealand’s North Island, the son of Sidney and Margaret (Watson) Knight. e joined the Seventh-day Adventist Church about 1912 and spent the year 1913 selling denominational books door-to-door in his home country. Monthly records show he sold Heralds of the Morning with some success. The same report indicates that Knight’s future wife, Irene Montague, was also on the team of New Zealand canvassers.

Peter Knopper and his wife, Kerry Sharelle were appointed as missionaries to Papua New Guinea at the beginning of 1985. In 1988 at Homu in the Eastern Highlands of the country Peter was killed in the course of his service.

Alfred Frederick John Kranz was a teacher and school administrator in Seventh-day Adventist schools in Australia and New Zealand.

Kukudu Adventist College is located on Kolumbangara Island, Western Province, Solomon Islands.

Frederick and Lily Lang were appointed to Fiji. Frederick and seven others lost their lives at sea in a hurricane in November 1930.

Lens and Betty Larwood were medical missionaries at Atoifi Hospital on the island of Malaita in the Solomon Islands. In August 1979 Lens lost his life in the course of his duties in a tractor accident.

Jope Laweloa was a Fijian missionary to Vanuatu and pastor in Fiji.

Arthur Lawson was an early missionary to Papua New Guinea and later worked among Australia’s indigenous people.

Pastor T. C. Lawson was a pastor and administrator who became the president of the Trans-Commonwealth Union Conference in Australia between 1952 and 1963.

John and Melva Lee served 34 of their 39 years of denominational employment in the South Pacific mission fields of Papua New Guinea, Tonga, and the Solomon Islands. Melva Lee trained as a nurse and used her knowledge and skills to treat disease and teach the principles of healthy living. John Lee trained as a teacher. After a period of school and system-wide leadership in education he was ordained, assuming leadership responsibility at local church, mission and union levels of the church structure.

​Ernest Charles Lemke was a Seventh-day Adventist pastor, evangelist, departmental leader, administrator, and pioneer missionary in Papua New Guinea.

​Ludwig Daniel August Lemke was a pioneer of the Seventh-day Adventist church in Australia. Through his work as a colporteur, publishing leader, evangelist, college principal, and conference resident, he helped to establish and grow the fledgling group of believers that formed the basis of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Australia. Well educated, intelligent, articulate, and deeply committed to his God, his faith, and his family, he was a man of vision, courage, and talent who gave all in the service of his God and his church.