Browse Articles

Show

sorted by: Title or Division

in

Only show articles:

Where category is

Where title begins with

Where location is in

Where title text includes

View list of unfinished articles

Hide advanced options -


Showing 561 – 580 of 670

James Scott Stewart served the Seventh-day Adventist Church in pastoral and departmental roles in four Australian states.

John Stockton was the first person in Australia to become a Seventh-day Adventist after the arrival of Seventh-day Adventist missionaries from the United States in 1885.

STORM CO is an acronym for ‘Service-to-Others-Really-Matters Company.’ It is a youth-outreach event that was initiated in the South Pacific Division and is designed to build community through service.

Sydney Victor Stratford was an office secretary, sales manager, home missions leader, business teacher, youth leader, and union conference secretary. He spent his career in the service of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Australasia.

Henry (Harry) and Olive Streeter spent a short time in missionary service in the Cook Islands. While Olive accompanied him caring for the home and children, Harry spent some 55 years in teaching and pastoral ministry in Australia and the South Pacific.

​Iti Strickland, a Cook Islander, was the first to invite Seventh-day Adventist missionaries to commence working on his home island of Aitutaki, Cook Islands. He became a Seventh-day Adventist and spent twenty years leading the work of the church on his home island and elsewhere as a missionary. His descendants continue to fill key roles in the work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific Division.

Sydney Adventist College commenced operation at Burwood, Sydney, in 1937. In 1948 the school transferred to Albert Road, Strathfield, where it operated until closed at the end of 2012.

​The Sydney Adventist Hospital is owned and operated by the South Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It is located in suburban Sydney at Wahroonga, NSW, Australia. It was opened on January 1, 1903.

​Richard Creswick Syme served as an administrator in several Adventist schools, including principal at New Zealand Missionary College (now Longburn Adventist College).

Tala’fekau Mo’oni (“Faithful Messenger” or “True Messenger”) was a periodical printed in the Tongan language between 1909 and 1956.

Tali Moni (“The True Story”) is a Seventh-day Adventist magazine printed in the Samoan language since 1911.

​Pacific Islanders Tanabose Viviriti Lukukana and Leah Barighaza served the Church at various capacities.

​Mary Elizabeth Tank was a Sabbath School and Missionary Volunteers director in Western Australia and New South Wales Conferences, and later a Bible instructor.

Dr. Joeli Taoi, commonly called “Dokta belong mifala” by the people of Vanuatu, was a missionary doctor in the Pacific Islands from 1958 to 1995. He was especially well known as a pioneer missionary doctor to Aore in New Hebrides (1958–1976).

​Born in the bush of South New Georgia, Solomon Islands to animist parents, Pastor Tasa Hivana became a teacher and pastor of the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church.

The Tasmanian Conference is a constituent of the Australian Union Conference. Its headquarters are located in Moonah, Tasmania.

​Penisimani (Benjamin) Tavodi (Ta-von-dy) was a Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Fijian ministerial worker who was a pioneer missionary in the territory of Papua. He was the first SDA missionary to die in service on the island of New Guinea.

​William and Mary Taylor were pioneering missionaries on the island of Ambrym, New Hebrides. Their service was interrupted by a serious volcanic eruption on the island in 1929.

​Te Karere o te Pono (“Messenger of Truth”) was a magazine printed for the Maori people of New Zealand in their own language.

​Te Maramarama (“The Lightbearer”) was a magazine printed for the people of the Society Islands in their own language.