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Showing 581 – 600 of 668

​Opened in Melbourne, Australia, in 1892, the Australasian Bible School was the forerunner of the Australasian Missionary College, which opened in Cooranbong, NSW, in 1897.

​The Gleaner, reporting primarily on the sales of literature evangelists, was circulated for only three years, from January 1895 to June 1896, and in its printed form from July 1896 (volume 1, number 1) to December 1897 (volume 2, number 6,).

The Helping Hand Mission (1898-1907) in Melbourne was a charitable enterprise that benefited the poor and needy as a result of efforts by the Seventh-day Adventist church members.

​In 1930 the Home Missions Department of the Australasian Division issued the first four numbers of a new paper titled The Interpreter of the Times.

The Missionary Leader began as a sixteen-page monthly periodical (later reduced to eight pages) published from 1914 to 1951. It provided resources for local church elders, home mission secretaries, Sabbath School superintendents, and local young people’s leaders.

The Outlook was an occasional periodical of the First World War-era focusing on topical religious issues.

​After initial organization as a denomination in 1863, the Seventh-day Adventist Church underwent a period of organizational reform between 1901 and 1903 which resulted in a modified Church structure.

​The Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church in the South Pacific region has been fortunate that issues of military service have been relatively few and that national governments in the region have been prepared to work cooperatively with the Church on practical solutions that have met the needs of governments while respecting the SDA stand on noncombatancy.

Young People’s Magazine had a publication life of less than a year in 1909.

Leonard C. Thompson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Thompson, of Albury. He was born in Victoria, Australia, in 1909. Leonard Thompson trained at Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital, graduating from the nursing course in 1933. He then worked as part of the hospital staff for the next two or three years. In December 1935, Thompson married nursing classmate Eileen Lethbridge from Perth in Western Australia. After Thompson qualified in radiography at Sydney University, the young couple accepted an appointment with the Public Health Department in the mandated territory of New Guinea. Their service was cut short when Thompson became a prisoner of war during the Japanese invasion during World War II. Thompson’s commitment was such that he preceded his family out to New Guinea two years before his wife and oldest daughter could get approval to join him.

​Harry Thomson was a carpenter to Avondale College, Avondale Health Retreat, and the community through his work on Ellen White’s home Sunnyside and individual contracts.

Alan Thrift, a singer and conductor, and his wife Yvonne Zanotti Thrift, a pianist, singer, and conductor, were associated with the music program at Australasian Missionary College (AMC), later Avondale College of Higher Education (Avondale), for over forty years.

Lyndon and Grace Thrift served in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, and Australia.

Richard Alfred Roy Thrift, an Adventist minister and administrator, and is wife, Ethel Thrift, a department secretary, served the Church in Australia, India, and Papua.

Allan and Ruth Tilley both graduated from the Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital as nurses.

Charles Tinworth was an Adventist missionary and Sanitarium Health Food (SHF) Company Manager.

​Togoba Hansenide Colony was opened in 1950 in order to treat cases of leprosy or Hansen’s disease in the Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

A part of the South Pacific Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Tokelau is within the administrative area of the Samoa-Tokelau Mission in the Trans Pacific Union Mission. With a population of only around 1500 people living on three Pacific coral atolls, Tokelau is one of the smallest and most remote nations in the world, located approximately 500 kilometers north of Samoa.

​Athal Tolhurst was born in Tonga of missionary parents. He was a pastor, evangelist and administrator who was for a time a Union President, Secretary of the South Pacific Division and Under-Secretary of the General Conference. He was married to Linley (Willis), and together they served the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church for 45 years.