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Showing 661 – 668 of 668

The Second World War had a significant impact on the work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific, most notably in New Guinea, Papua, and the Solomon Islands, which were the scenes of bitter conflict between Japanese and Allied forces. In particular, the church had to negotiate its interaction with state authorities over support for the war effort and compulsory military service, and manage its work in war-affected regions.

​Phillip Wright was an Adventist nurse and mission administrator who trained at the Sydney Sanitarium. He moved into evangelistic work and was for a time the superintendent of the Eastern Polynesian Mission based at Papeete, Tahiti.

​Sara Mareta Young, a descendant of the 1789 HMS Bounty mutineer Edward (Ned) Young, was one of the first Pitcairn Islanders (if not the first) to travel to other Pacific Islands as a Seventh-day Adventist missionary.

​Sarah Grace Young was among the first Sabbathkeepers and Seventh-day Adventist converts on Pitcairn Island.

Youth programs in the South Pacific Division train youth to be mission-minded and to give selfless service and also teach youth valuable life and outdoor skills.

​Wilton Edward (Bill) Zanotti was a Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) teacher and educational administrator who worked in church schools in Queensland, Western Australia and New Zealand. He spent ten years at the Aboriginal mission school at Mona Mona where he established a choir and brass band, which became widely known and appreciated.

William Edwin “Bill” Zeunert gave forty-four years of service to the Seventh-day Adventist Church, working for the Sanitarium Health Food Company (SHF) as manager, and as assistant treasurer at the Australasian Division of Seventh-day Adventists in Wahroonga.