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Showing 41 – 60 of 60

​Originally owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Nutana was a health food factory in Denmark.

​Nyhyttan Health and Medical Centre was an Adventist health resort in the deep woods of an isolated region in Mid-Sweden. In 1898 when the Nyhyttan property was purchased, the Adventist church membership in the area was around 700, mostly people of lesser means. So it was indeed a venture in faith. It lasted for almost 100 years.

Melvin and Mae Oss were missionaries to India. Melvin was the founder of Camp MiVoden and co-founder of Upper Columbia Academy.

​Pastor Walter Edwin Read worked for the church as a colporteur, evangelist, missionary worker, departmental secretary, publishing house manager, and president of the British Union Conference, Northern European Division, and the Caribbean Union Conference, as well as General Field Secretary for the General Conference.

​Bernard Eldred Seton was a minister, educator, departmental director, union president, division executive secretary, associate secretary of the General Conference and an author.

​Skodsborg Badesanatorium (Skodsborg Sanatorium) is a pioneer Seventh-day Adventist medical institution at Skodsborg, a suburb of Copenhagen, Denmark. It was originally owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and stood as a model and inspiration for other sanitariums and hospitals in Northern Europe. The institution is still being operated as a health resort under the name Kurhotel Skodsborg, but it no longer belongs to Seventh-day Adventists.

​Frederick Albert Spearing served the church as a literature evangelist, tent master, Bible teacher, pastor, missionary, administrator, and conference president.

​The Stanborough Press Limited is the publishing house owned and operated by the British Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists in the United Kingdom and Ireland (BUC).

John Paul Sundquist was a pastor, missionary, educator, administrator and photographer. Sundquist served as a missionary in many African countries, in his native Sweden, and at the Northern Europe-West Africa Division Office in St. Albans, U.K.

Klaas Tilstra, an Adventist administrator and missionary, was born in 1897 in the Dutch province of Friesland (Frisia).

Hendrik Twijnstra was a pioneer Seventh-day Adventist pastor and leader in the Netherlands East Indies (now Indonesia).

In 1890 M. M. Olsen and his wife were called home to Denmark, from the United States, and assigned to establish a school in Copenhagen, together with Carl Ottosen, who later established Skodsborg Sanatorium.

Frederik Johannes was an administrator, author, and radio speaker from the Netherlands.

Vredenoord, the Adventist nursing home in the Netherlands, started as a home for senior citizens operated by the Netherlands Union of Churches Conference. Today it is a registered nursing home operated as a supporting ministry and subsidized by government grants.

​Kathleen Joyce, noted contralto singer, received high praise from music critics in Europe and the United States.

​The West Nordic Union Conference was a former church organizational unit in the Northern European Division covering the territory of Denmark, Faroe Islands, Greenland, and Norway, and comprising the East Denmark, East Norway, North Norway, West Denmark, and West Norway conferences.

​Gösta Alfred Wiklander served the Seventh-day Adventist Church for about 75 years in different capacities: office worker, canvasser, canvassing leader in the publishing ministry, pastor-evangelist, Bible correspondence school director, communication director, public affairs and religious liberty director, conference and union president, executive committee member of the Trans-European Division, principal, researcher, and author.

Joseph Wintzen, administrator, evangelist, and author, was one of the most important early leaders in the Dutch Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Missionaries to India themselves, Alfred and Bertha Youngberg, belonged to a family line of missionaries. The four generations of the Youngberg-Oss family produced 25 missionaries.