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Showing 81 – 100 of 116

​Originally owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Nutana was a health food factory in Denmark.

​Nyhyttan Health and Medical Centre was an Adventist health resort in the deep woods of an isolated region in Mid-Sweden. In 1898 when the Nyhyttan property was purchased, the Adventist church membership in the area was around 700, mostly people of lesser means. So it was indeed a venture in faith. It lasted for almost 100 years.

​Situated in a remote and scenic site halfway between Stockholm and Oslo, Nyhyttan Mission School was an Adventist Swedish training institute and seminary from 1898–1932.

The Norwegian Olaf Johan Olsen, also known as Iceland-Olsen and the Apostle to Iceland, had a remarkable mission career in the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a missionary pastor, leader, and administrator. In Iceland, over a period of 33 years, he raised up the local church from almost nothing to eight congregations, second only to the Lutheran State Church.

Melvin and Mae Oss were missionaries to India. Melvin was the founder of Camp MiVoden and co-founder of Upper Columbia Academy.

​Dr. Carl Ottosen was a founder, promoter, and leader of the Seventh-day Adventist health work in Scandinavia. Together with his wife, Johanne Pauline, he founded Frydenstrand Sanatorium and Skodsborg Sanatorium in Denmark, following Dr. John Harvey Kellogg’s model from Battle Creek in America. His influence and groundbreaking work set a new trend for preventive and curative health work in Denmark and earned him the respect of his colleagues and the order of Knight of Dannebrog from the Danish king.2 He was a strong supporter and participant of the Adventist church work in his home country, Denmark.

Emanuel W. Pedersen lived on four continents and in six different countries while serving at all levels of the Adventist Church organization from colporteur, teacher, and pastor in his homeland to general field secretary at the General Conference. In his lifetime of more than 100 years, he saw his Church grow from fewer than 100,000 members to more than 13 million.

Julius Persson was one of the first Swedish missionaries to East Africa. His was a life with different commitments: colporteur, evangelist in Sweden, a multi-task missionary in East Africa, and health worker in Brazil and Germany.

​Julius Christensen Raft was a Danish pastor, evangelist, and administrator. He served as president of the Danish Conference, from 1906 to 1908, and the Scandinavian Union, from 1908 to 1922. He was a field secretary in the European Division from 1922 to 1928, and a field secretary of the Southern European Division until 1932. For many years he was chairman of the Scandinavian Philanthropic Society and owner of Skodsborg Sanitarium, which grew to be the largest health institution within the Adventist Church during his time.

Known as the friend of the youth, Steen Rasmussen played a major role in developing the youth work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, first in Scandinavia and later in the rest of Europe. As an energetic person with organizational skills and a winning disposition, he served as the head of the Home Missionary Department of the General Conference.

​Pastor Walter Edwin Read worked for the church as a colporteur, evangelist, missionary worker, departmental secretary, publishing house manager, and president of the British Union Conference, Northern European Division, and the Caribbean Union Conference, as well as General Field Secretary for the General Conference.

Sine Renlev was Denmark’s first female Seventh-day Adventist preacher. With her pleasant personality, her guitar, and her beautiful singing voice, she drew large numbers to her Bible lectures in public halls, tents, or the homes of interested people. Having become a Seventh-day Adventist in 1879, she almost immediately set out to preach the present truth, and no one could stop her from sharing her newfound faith.

​Henry Robson was a long-serving missionary to Tanganyika and Uganda. He and his wife, Ada, helped establish and develop the Adventist mission work in Africa, serving there for 32 years.

In July 1901 Friedensau, Germany, was the venue for the consideration of changes within the Adventist Church in Europe. A camp meeting began on July 18 during which the 19 delegates from the Scandinavian countries formed what was to become the Scandinavian Union Conference, comprising the Swedish, Norwegian, and Danish Conferences, and the mission fields of Finland, Iceland, and Greenland.

​Børge Schantz’s denominational service included pastoral work, church administration, teaching, and lecturing at colleges and universities. He set up a global center for Islamic Studies and taught Adventist-Muslim relations. He wrote books and articles that had worldwide readership.

The Publishing work in South-East European Union Conference (SEEUC) is made up of three entities: 1) Publishing House “Preporod” (established in 1919, situated in Radoslava Grujića 4, Belgrade, Serbia); 2) Printing House “Euro Dream” (established in 2008, situated in Industrijska zona bb, Nova Pazova, Serbia); and 3) Bookstore “Knjigolovka” (established in 2016, situated in Njegoševa 19, Belgrade, Serbia).

​Bernard Eldred Seton was a minister, educator, departmental director, union president, division executive secretary, associate secretary of the General Conference and an author.

​Skodsborg Badesanatorium (Skodsborg Sanatorium) is a pioneer Seventh-day Adventist medical institution at Skodsborg, a suburb of Copenhagen, Denmark. It was originally owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and stood as a model and inspiration for other sanitariums and hospitals in Northern Europe. The institution is still being operated as a health resort under the name Kurhotel Skodsborg, but it no longer belongs to Seventh-day Adventists.

​Frederick Albert Spearing served the church as a literature evangelist, tent master, Bible teacher, pastor, missionary, administrator, and conference president.