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Showing 201 – 220 of 3253

​W. H. Anderson was a leading pioneer of Adventist mission to the indigenous peoples of southern Africa. His achievements and his ability to communicate passion for mission did much to generate interest among American Adventists in the church’s nascent work on the African continent.

Geraldo Marques de Andrade, pioneer canvasser, was born December 27, 1927, in the city of Carmo do Cajuru, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

​Hattie Andre was a missionary, Bible teacher, and educational leader influential in the formative years of three Adventist institutions of higher learning.

​A pioneer writer and scholar-evangelist, John Nevins Andrews exercised wide influence in the early Seventh-day Adventist church serving alongside James and Ellen White and Joseph Bates as one of the inner circle of leaders involved in founding the movement. He held a variety of important leadership positions including General Conference president, editor of the Review and Herald, and local conference president. He also served as a long-term member of the General Conference Executive Committee.

​Celian Emerald Andross was an American evangelist and church administrator who dedicated his life to working for the Adventist Church. Andross held many successful evangelistic meetings in the American West and along the mid-Atlantic before serving as the youth director of the Columbia Union Conference in Maryland for six years.

​Elmer Ellsworth Andross was an evangelist, administrator, educator, author, and missionary. The end of the 19th century was a period of significant losses for the Seventh-day Adventist church with the death of pioneers James White, J. N. Andrews, and Uriah Smith; the apostasies of bright lights such as Albion Fox Ballenger and John Harvey Kellogg, and losses of institutional buildings to fire. This period has also been described as the turning point toward unity, reform, solvency, and ardent evangelism, and Elmer Andross was an integral part of these changes.

Lucy Andrus taught in church schools in Minnesota and Washington State for a decade before giving 16 years of active mission service in China as a teacher and Bible worker.

Angola North-Eastern Mission is a church administrative unit of the North-Eastern Angola Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventists.

Angola South Luanda and Cabinda Mission is a subsidiary church administrative unit of the North-Eastern Angola Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists.

​Anguilla is a British overseas territory in the Caribbean. The first two Seventh-day Adventists in Anguilla were baptized in 1932.

Arnoldo Oscar Anniehs, pastor and evangelist, was born February 26, 1915, in the city of Curitiba, in the state of Parana, Brazil.

Paul Kwame Owusu Ansah was an Adventist evangelist from Ghana.

The Adventist message officially reached Antigua when Elder William Arnold arrived in December 1888.

Antillian College (Colegio de las Antillas) was the main educational institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Cuba from 1940 to 1967. This campus also became the main center of higher education for the Inter-American Division. It was there that workers were trained from and for Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, as well as for the other unions in this division’s territory.

​Aore Adventist Academy is a Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) boarding secondary school on Aore, a small island near Luganville, the capital of Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu.

Aore Adventist Hospital operated between 1961 and 1977, and again briefly in 1981. It was located on the campus of Aore Adventist High School New Hebrides (modern Vanuatu).

Isaías Apolinário, businessman and patron, was born September 28, 1917, in Taubaté city, São Paulo state.

Pedro Apolinario, teacher and volunteer pastor, was born April 7, 1919, in Tremembe, Sao Paulo.

​The Appeal for Missions was an annual campaign in which church members voluntarily went door-to-door, soliciting donations from the public for the church mission program in the Pacific Islands.