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Showing 2461 – 2480 of 3534

​In the early 1920s Meanou, from Tubusereia village, some 30 kilometers (19 miles) southeast of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, decided to become a missionary for the London Missionary Society (LMS), and went from his village looking for a training school. His plan was to go to the LMS Manumanu Training School, some 200 kilometers (125 miles) northwest of Port Moresby and then become a missionary to the Papuan Gulf. However, he was discouraged by Iamo, his wife, because he had such a bad temper and she did not think he would make a good missionary with those character traits.

George Edward Peters was one of the leading pioneering evangelists, urban pastors, and church administrators between 1908 and 1953, serving the predominantly African American believers. Elder Peters was the first Caribbean born Adventist leader to serve his church at its headquarters serving as the director of the Negro (Colored/Regional) department between 1941 and 1953.

Clara “Nomsa” Peterson-Rock was a benevolent and dignified pastor’s wife, Oakwood College’s first lady, a pioneering archivist, a gifted musician, and a loving companion to her husband, Calvin B.

​From the 1920s to the 1950s, Alfred W. Peterson gave leadership to youth ministries in the Seventh-day Adventist church at the General Conference, Australasian Division, and three union conferences in the United States.

​Frank L. Peterson, pastor, educator, administrator and author, was one of the denomination’s foremost Black leaders from the 1930s to the 1960s. He was president of Oakwood College for nearly a decade and the first Black Adventist to become a vice president of the General Conference.

Trained teachers, William and Irralee Petrie served at Matupi, near Rabaul on the island of New Britain, and at Kainantu in the Eastern Highlands of New Guinea, then transferred to Samoa before returning to clerical, secretarial, and presidential responsibilities in Australia and New Zealand.

​Petropolis Adventist Academy is a boarding school with elementary and high school levels of education. The institution operates in the territory of the Southeast Brazil Union.

Héctor Juan Peverini was a descendant of pioneers, pastor, writer, administrator of the church in the Austral Union Conference, president of River Plate Academy (Entre Ríos, Argentina), and a departmental director in the South American Division.

Baldur Pfeiffer was both an important Adventist mission historian – one of the first to explore Adventist missionary impulses coming from Europe – and a dedicated humanitarian. He contributed both to the Seventh-day Adventist denomination and to the landscape of education and humanitarian work internationally by building up institutions and organizations such as Middle East College, Theologische Hochschule Friedensau, the European Adventist Archives, and Support Africa.

Philip Lemon University is located in the center of Lubumbashi city, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

​Joseph Phillips was an English missionary, colporteur, church planter, editor, educator, and church administrator.

​Paul Piari, born as a tribal warrior from Engan Province in the highlands of Papua New Guinea, became a Seventh-day Adventist pastor, opening new territory in the country, often in the face of fierce persecution

​The Piaui Mission (MPi) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church (SDA), located in the territory of the Northeast Brazil Union Mission Conference. Its headquarters are located on Acésio do Rêgo Monteiro st., no. 1977, CEP 64049-610, in Planalto Ininga neighborhood, in the city of Teresina, in the state of Piauí, Brazil.

Henri Pichot served the Seventh-day Adventist Church in North Africa as an evangelist, pastor, and administrator from about 1930 to 1966.

Joni Mae Pierre-Louis served Oakwood College/University from the time she entered as a student and through more than a decade as a member of the music faculty.

Pastor Bert Pietz and Mary Grace Pietz were Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) missionaries to the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) and Papua New Guinea who also engaged in ministry in Australia, and Bert served as president of the Tasmanian Conference for six years.

​Robert Daniel Pifer was the third overseas missionary to serve as director of Rwenzori Mission Station, at Mitandi. His wife, Gerd, was a nurse and teacher at Mitandi Dispensary. They served the mission station under a very hostile social and political climate.

​Oseas Cerezo Pilar was an Adventist physician, medical director, and an honored diplomate of anesthesiology, leader, and educator in the Philippines.

​Erik and Ida Pilquist were pioneer missionaries to China. Erik worked for several Bible societies as an independent missionary. At one point he played a pivotal role in the development of Adventist missions in China. Ida was a steadfast advocate on behalf of the women of China, training “Bible women” and starting girls’ schools.