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​This article presents an account of the influence and witness of some remarkable martyred and persecuted European Adventists during the political and religious epochs of the Ottoman Empire, Soviet Communism, and German Fascism.

​The Ministry of Healing, published in 1905, is considered Ellen White’s most comprehensive work on health and healthful living. The book is also a representation of the Seventh-day Adventist philosophy of health.

The Missionary Leader began as a sixteen-page monthly periodical (later reduced to eight pages) published from 1914 to 1951. It provided resources for local church elders, home mission secretaries, Sabbath School superintendents, and local young people’s leaders.

Building on different interpretative traditions, there have been two major views among Seventh-day Adventists on the number of the beast (the number 666) in Revelation 13:17, 18. While there are valid reasons to interpret it as the papal title Vicarius Filii Dei, as several Seventh-day Adventist writers have done over the years, others have viewed it as a triple six indicative of a Satanic trinity.

The Outlook was an occasional periodical of the First World War-era focusing on topical religious issues.

​After initial organization as a denomination in 1863, the Seventh-day Adventist Church underwent a period of organizational reform between 1901 and 1903 which resulted in a modified Church structure.

​The Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church in the South Pacific region has been fortunate that issues of military service have been relatively few and that national governments in the region have been prepared to work cooperatively with the Church on practical solutions that have met the needs of governments while respecting the SDA stand on noncombatancy.

​The article uses extant sources to examine the almost undocumented travails of the SDA Church in the Soviet Union during the World War II (1939-1945).

​Kollegal School for Speech and Hearing Impaired is located in a rural setting just outside the town of Kollegal in Karnataka, India. Funded by Asian Aid, Australia, and Child Impact International and operated by the Adventist Church, it is a boarding school with one hundred students.

​The Voice of Prophecy is a radio and television program of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, broadcast by New Time Radio and New Time TV (Hope Channel Brazil).

Young People’s Magazine had a publication life of less than a year in 1909.

​Eduardo Werner Thomann was one of the first persons to accept the Adventist faith in the republic of Chile; he was the first ordained minister in South America and a pioneer in many areas of the evangelistic work in different countries.

​Víctor Edwin Thomann was one of the first people to accept the Adventist faith in Chile, along with his brother Eduardo. He was an Adventist pioneer in several fields of the evangelistic work in Chile, Bolivia, and Argentina.

​Edward Duraiswamy Thomas, one of the first two national Seventh-day Adventist ministers in the Southern Asia Division to be ordained, served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as teacher, translator, editor, evangelist, and conference administrator. His wife, Sellammal, served faithfully by his side as preceptress, food matron, Sabbath School secretary, and in dispensary work.

Gloria Thomas was the first South Asian woman to serve at the division departmental level, having served as an associate in the Sabbath School department in charge of children’s divisions in the Southern Asia Division.

American missionary to China from 1902 to 1931, Ida Thompson opened the first Adventist school in China – Bethel Girls School in Canton (Guangzhou). That school became what is now Hong Kong Adventist College.

Leonard C. Thompson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Thompson, of Albury. He was born in Victoria, Australia, in 1909. Leonard Thompson trained at Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital, graduating from the nursing course in 1933. He then worked as part of the hospital staff for the next two or three years. In December 1935, Thompson married nursing classmate Eileen Lethbridge from Perth in Western Australia. After Thompson qualified in radiography at Sydney University, the young couple accepted an appointment with the Public Health Department in the mandated territory of New Guinea. Their service was cut short when Thompson became a prisoner of war during the Japanese invasion during World War II. Thompson’s commitment was such that he preceded his family out to New Guinea two years before his wife and oldest daughter could get approval to join him.

Paul Lamont Thompson, an Adventist educator and administrator, left the Adventist Church in 1931 after having served as president of two Adventist colleges.

​Harry Thomson was a carpenter to Avondale College, Avondale Health Retreat, and the community through his work on Ellen White’s home Sunnyside and individual contracts.

William Wilson Thomson was an Adventist minister and administrator in the Caribbean Union for thirty-two years.