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​Homer and Lenna (Whitney) Salisbury spent their lives dedicated to educating Adventist young people.

​Wilbur Dixon Salisbury is best known for skillful management of the expanding Adventist publishing work in Australia, where he served from 1893 to 1909.

Alwyn Salom was a South Australian. He was a biblical scholar with particular emphasis on New Testament studies. Much of his life was devoted to training young men and women for ministry in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. He engaged in a number of significant theological forums. In his later years he was the director of the Institute of Church Ministry in the South Pacific Division.

​Salvador Adventist Hospital was a medical unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church that operated from 1984 to 1990.

Salvation FM Radio is the only Seventh-day Adventist church radio station currently operating in South Sudan. It was initiated by retired pastor Fulgensio Okayo in 2006 when he was the ministerial secretary for South Sudan Field and district pastor for Juba Central church.1 He started the project by hanging a horned microphone on the tree and conducted early morning preaching called “Wata ashoba” in Arabic meaning “it’s dawn.” Many people opposed it as a disturbance, but some appreciated it as a morning blessing.

​The Samahuru Clinic is a subsidiary medical institution of the West Zimbabwe Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

Western Samoa, as distinct from American Samoa, was a German protectorate until the outbreak of World War I when New Zealand occupied the group. New Zealand continued to administer the islands as a trust territory until 1962, when the country became independent. In 1997 the word “Western” was dropped from its name. It is a Polynesian nation in the South Pacific Ocean consisting of two main islands, Savai’i and Upolu. Seventh-day Adventists hold approximately 5 percent of the population.

Samoa Adventist College is the senior Seventh-day Adventist secondary school in Samoa.

The Samoa Sanitarium operated on the outskirts of Apia, the capital of Samoa. between 1895 and 1905. It was built largely at the impetus of Dr. Frederick Braucht.

The Samoa-Tokelau Mission is a small mission in the territory of the Trans-Pacific Union Mission of the South Pacific Division. Its headquarters are in Apia, Samoa.

​San Yu Adventist School is currently the only Adventist school in Singapore that offers primary and secondary education with government examinations.

​Hezron Sande was a pastor and administrator in Kenya.

​Cree Sandefur served the church for more than four decades as a pastor, conference departmental director, conference president, and union president.

​Arthur James Sanderson, physician and pastor, was born October 1, 1865. After earning a medical degree at Cooper Medical College of San Francisco, he became associated with St. Helena Sanitarium for 10 years, eight as medical superintendent.

​The Seventh-day Adventist Church’s Health Food Department in the South Pacific Division, referred to as Sanitarium Health & Wellbeing Group, owns a number of innovative health food and health and wellness operations. This group of pioneering entities share a vision to improve the health and well-being of communities in Australia, New Zealand, and globally, in the context of the church’s religious, charitable, and educational work. The group includes: Sanitarium Health Food Company – Australia and New Zealand; Life Health Foods Australia, New Zealand, India, and the United Kingdom; Vitality Works Australia and New Zealand; Lifestyle Medicine Institute; and the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP).

Sanitarium Health Food cafés were opened in several cities in Australia in the early 1900s.

Having made a start with cafés in Sydney and Melbourne, George Fisher, the Sanitarium Health Food Company (SHF) general manager, was keen to expand into the major cities of New Zealand.

​In late 1997 Sanitarium created a liquid breakfast it called UP & GO.TM This was a world-first innovation. In 2012 UP&GO became the number one breakfast cereal brand in Australia. In 2020 UP&GO is still the number one brand in the cereal aisle in Australia, both in value and volume, and the number one brand in New Zealand in volume. The combined output of the UP&GO brand across Australia and New Zealand would fill 20 Olympic pools annually.

​The Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon series is the largest triathlon for under-16s in the world. Inspired by growing interest in the sport of triathlon, the series began in New Zealand in the early 1990s and Australia in 1999.

​Weet-Bix is a wheat-based breakfast cereal produced by Sanitarium Health Food Company. The malty biscuit is well known throughout Australia and New Zealand as one of the healthier cereals on the breakfast food market. It has been a staple for many families for more than 90 years. It is low in sugar, 97 percent whole grain, and made with 100 percent Australian-grown wheat, vitamins, and minerals.