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Showing 2501 – 2520 of 2560

​Harold and Mabel White served together in New Zealand, Australia, and Fiji. Harold White worked as a pastor, evangelist, and church administrator. Mabel White was a teacher, college matron, and a founding faculty member of the Pukekura Training School in New Zealand.

Herbert and Vera White both began serving the Seventh-day Adventist Church before their marriage, Herbert White as a colporteur and Vera Zeunert as a primary school teacher. For forty-two of the next forty-three years of service, Herbert White served the church in leadership responsibilities with Vera White providing daily support at home, and sometimes accompanying him to distant towns, islands, and countries.

​Mary (Kelsey) White, the first wife of William C. White, served as an editor, treasurer, and missionary.

​William Byington White’s primary contribution to the Seventh-day Adventist Church lies in his thirty-three years (1887-1920) of service as a president of four conferences (South Dakota, Nebraska, Indiana, and Montana) and four union conferences (Pacific, North Pacific, Atlantic, and South African).

​Joseph (Jacob) Wibbens was a pioneer missionary, worker, and pastor in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Harold Bulmer Priestly Wicks was a missionary to the Cook Islands, Tasmania, and Tahiti. His first wife, Madeline, was a devoted missionary who died of malaria in the Cook Islands. Gwendolen served with Harold as a teacher and missionary in Tasmania and Tahiti.

​Gösta Alfred Wiklander served the Seventh-day Adventist Church for about 75 years in different capacities: office worker, canvasser, canvassing leader in the publishing ministry, pastor-evangelist, Bible correspondence school director, communication director, public affairs and religious liberty director, conference and union president, executive committee member of the Trans-European Division, principal, researcher, and author.

Norman and Alma Wiles were among the first missionaries to Malekula Island, New Hebrides. After just a few years on Malekula, Norman Wiles died of blackwater fever. After her husband’s death Alma Wiles served in New Guinea, Australia, Nigeria, and the United States as a nurse specializing in tropical diseases and midwifery.

Ricardo José Wilfart was a pastor and administrator in South America.

A. H. Williams was a pioneer missionary, church administrator, and medical director who served the Seventh-day Adventist Church with Mabel, his first wife, a teacher and midwife, in the Southern Asia Division, and with Iris, his second wife, a midwife, in Watford, England.

​Annie Mary Williams served the Seventh-day Adventist Church in various capacities, including missionary to Fiji and director of the Sabbath School Department in the New South Wales Conference.

​Benjamin Jack Williams was a school and church administrator who with his wife, Ada, served the Seventh-day Adventist church in India and North America.

​Helen Williams was a pioneering minister, Bible worker, teacher, and missionary in South Africa.

​The Willowdene Group of Schools is a Seventh-day Adventist co-educational institution that is owned and operated by Central Jamaica Conference, located at 58 Brunswick Avenue in Spanish Town St. Catherine. The school is recognized by the Government of Jamaica through the Ministry of Education as well as the accrediting body of the Inter-American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

​Gilbert Temple Wilson was a church administrator, including New Zealand Conference president.

William (Bill) Wilson was the longest serving manager of the Church’s Sanitarium Health Food Factory at Cooranbong, occupying that position for almost 30 years. During that time he worked closely with Avondale College and was very involved in community outreach in the Lake Macquarie and Newcastle districts.

Joseph Wintzen, administrator, evangelist, and author, was one of the most important early leaders in the Dutch Seventh-day Adventist Church.

On January 7, 1979, praise to God began flowing from a 210-foot antenna on the campus of Oakwood College: 90.1 FM WOCG officially began broadcasting The Best in Music and the Spoken Word each day for 12 hours. The years leading up to that momentous day in January of 1979 were ones of uncertainty and a true journey of faith for the administration, staff, and faculty of what was then called Oakwood College.