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​The Pastor Manoel Soares Academy (Instituto Educacional Pastor Manoel Soares or IEMS) offers early childhood, primary, and secondary education in a boarding and day school system. It is located in the mission field of the South Brazil Union Conference (União Sul-Brasileira or USB) and, although it is not part of the Seventh-day Adventist Church worldwide education network, it seeks to offer integral education in accordance with the values of Adventist education. The academy is located in Braganey, the state of Paraná, Brazil.

Pathfinder was the name given to two floating clinics that operated sequentially on the Sepik River, Papua New Guinea, beginning in 1965.

Born in Cooranbong, NSW, Arthur was the youngest child of Bertha Emma (née Pocock), who as a girl had known Ellen White in Cooranbong, and William Nelson Patrick.

​James Elisha Patterson was the first black Seventh-day Adventist to go out from the United States as a foreign missionary.

​Paul Yin Hee Phang was a pastor and administrator in Singapore and Malaysia.

​Elisha Paul was an Adventist pastor, evangelist, and administrator in Myanmar.

Montana Paul was a teacher, pastor, principal, mission president, and union department director.

​Pe Yee was an Adventist pastor, administrator, and writer in Myanmar for more than thirty years.

​Gerald and Winifred Peacock were career missionaries in the South Pacific Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, serving in a variety of roles in Papua, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and the New Hebrides (Vanuatu today). Gerald Peacock was later the leader of the developing work of the Church in the northern part of the state of Queensland, Australia. Their final assignment was four years together developing the Aboriginal work at the Mona Mona Mission in North Queensland.

​Sarah Peck was an educational pioneer and curriculum author, and a literary assistant to Ellen G. White.

Emanuel W. Pedersen lived on four continents and in six different countries while serving at all levels of the Adventist Church organization from colporteur, teacher, and pastor in his homeland to general field secretary at the General Conference. In his lifetime of more than 100 years, he saw his Church grow from fewer than 100,000 members to more than 13 million.

​A devoted church leader, Pein Kyi was an important figure of second-generation Adventists in Myanmar.

​Rolando Enrique Peinado Hernández was an Adventist mathematician and educator from Colombia.

Penfigo Adventist Hospital (Hospital Adventista do Penfigo or HAP) is a medical missionary institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil and is part of the Adventist Health International Network.

​Ronald Ernest Pengilley gave forty-six years of service to the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific Division. He is best remembered as the manager of the Signs Publishing Company in Victoria for almost eighteen years (1962–1980).

​Antônio Leôncio da Penha was a literature evangelist and pioneer Adventist in Bahia, Brazil.

Peninsular Malaysia is the western part of Malaysia, located between Thailand in the North and Singapore in the South with a total land area of 130,590 square kilometers.

Jacob Bernard (also spelled Jakob Bernhard) Penner was an Adventist pastor, evangelist, teacher, and editor from Russia.

​Richard Penniman’s paradoxical career combined Seventh-day Adventist evangelism with international renown as rock 'n' roll pioneer Little Richard.

The Penny-a-Day Plan was a system introduced in the Australasian Union Conference in 1911 to encourage members to support the distribution of church publications.