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​William C. Sisley, architect and builder of many of Adventism’s earliest institutions, also served as manager of the church’s publishing houses in Battle Creek and London.

Sitoti SDA Mission Rural Health Center is owned by the West Zambia Field of Seventh-day Adventists, and is operated through government grants and donations.

John Miyambu Sitwala was a pastor, church administrator, and mentor to the youth and to young leaders.

​Petra (Tunheim) Skadsheim was a pioneer missionary in Southeast Asia. Ultimately she gave her life in service in the mission field to which she committed her life.

Olaf Alexander Skau, a Norwegian by birth, an American by adoption, chose to be a life-long missionary to Southern Asia Division and was involved in varied responsibilities of the church: teacher, school administrator, departmental director, publishing house manager, and a caring leader of needy children who turned out to be strong workers and leaders of the church.

​Skodsborg Badesanatorium (Skodsborg Sanatorium) is a pioneer Seventh-day Adventist medical institution at Skodsborg, a suburb of Copenhagen, Denmark. It was originally owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and stood as a model and inspiration for other sanitariums and hospitals in Northern Europe. The institution is still being operated as a health resort under the name Kurhotel Skodsborg, but it no longer belongs to Seventh-day Adventists.

Oldřich Sládek was a pastor, president of the Czech-Slovakian Union Conference, and Euro-Africa Division secretary.

The Slovakian Conference was first organized in 1919 as a mission to oversee the Adventist activities in Slovakia.

Adventists became active in Slovakia at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. The first missionaries from Germany and Hungary worked in the then Prešpork (today’s Bratislava), Košice, as well as the Liptov region in central Slovakia. The first Adventist churches were formed in the period of 1911‒1919.

​Carrol S. Small, M.D., taught at the Loma Linda University School of Medicine from 1937 to 1997, except for seven years of mission service in India.

Mary Maud Smart, an Adventist educator, taught in the South Pacific for forty-six years. She was a respected pioneer of Seventh-day Adventist educational philosophy, principles, and practice.

Annie Rebekah Smith was a gifted writer, editor, and artist who devoted her abilities to the early publishing work of what would become the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Kenneth Smith served the country of Thailand for 12 years, including a term as president of the Thailand Mission from late 1972 to mid-1974, and served the church for more than three decades.

Gordon and Maud Smith were pioneer medical missionaries in the South Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. Several years after Maud died, Gordon married Vera Constance Aldred. Together they taught schools and worked with the Maoris in New Zealand.

Herbert and his wife, Thelma, were pioneer missionaries in Central China in the 1920s. Herbert’s ministry was tragically cut short when he was murdered by bandits. Thelma bravely continued her service in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan until her retirement in 1972.

​Read Smith was born in 1875 in Woolwich, London. Available records name only his thirty-five-year-old father, W. J. Smith, who eventually settled in America. Smith’s father was a devout Christian who did not believe in physical punishment for a child. Instead, when Smith did wrong he was taught by his father to pray to God for forgiveness. In his early teenage years, Smith aspired to be a medical missionary and obtained work with a doctor to familiarize himself with the profession. Later, he spent some time in Canada before returning to England and sailing for Australia. He was engaged in a commercial business in Western Australia when he and his Australian wife, Lucy, became Seventh-day Adventists.

​Samuel Parker Smith, known as Parker or S. Parker, was a missionary to the Island of San Luis, Colombia and Panama.

​American missionary in The United States, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan from 1927 until 1984. Smith’s husband Herbert was murdered by bandits in China weeks after arriving at their first mission posting as young newlyweds and young parents. Mrs. Smith remained in Asia as a missionary for most of the next forty-seven years.

​William James Smith was born in Hanworth, Middlesex, England, on May 4, 1867, and christened there on June 9. He migrated to New Zealand and married Eliza Wall in 1888. She also was from England, born in Lewes, Sussex, on July 2, 1857. They became Seventh-day Adventists under the ministry of Eugene Farnsworth in 1896. William, at the time, was a schoolteacher with the New Zealand Education Department. As new church members they attended a small Sabbath School company with Sidney Amyes on the Irwell farmlands, near Christchurch, and became close friends. When the central Christchurch meetinghouse was organized in Barbados Street, both men were among its leading officers.