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Showing 3141 – 3160 of 3555

​Opened in Melbourne, Australia, in 1892, the Australasian Bible School was the forerunner of the Australasian Missionary College, which opened in Cooranbong, NSW, in 1897.

​The Gleaner, reporting primarily on the sales of literature evangelists, was circulated for only three years, from January 1895 to June 1896, and in its printed form from July 1896 (volume 1, number 1) to December 1897 (volume 2, number 6,).

The Christian Educator was a monthly periodical devoted to the philosophy and methods of education in Seventh-day Adventist homes, elementary schools, academies and colleges. It was produced under the aegis of the General Conference Education Department and printed at the Review and Herald Publishing Company, Battle Creek, Michigan.

The Czech Media Center is one of the media centers in the Inter-European Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It serves the country of Czech Republic and Czech-speaking peoples wherever they may be located in the world.

Ancestral veneration in Tanzania cuts cross World Religions: Christianity, Islam and African Traditional Religion. Church programs on nurture and retention seek to teach new members how to abstain from forms of ancestral veneration present in their communities.

The Helping Hand Mission (1898-1907) in Melbourne was a charitable enterprise that benefited the poor and needy as a result of efforts by the Seventh-day Adventist church members.

The Bakonzo are part of the Bantu people who are found in East, Central and Southern Africa. They predominantly live around and on the slopes of Mount Rwenzori in western Uganda; and they are the same people with the Banande of Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in North Kivu Province. They are one in culture: Language, food, customs and social behavior. They are referred to differently in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo due to the colonialists who ruled Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the second half of the 19th century and in the first half of the 20th century. Uganda was colonized by the British while the Democratic Republic of Congo was colonized by the Belgians. The collective name for both the Bakonzo and Banande is Abayira and their language is Oluyira. Therefore, Bakonzo, Banande, and Abayira refer to the same people.

Practiced by more than 7 million people, indigenous religion burial services differ greatly among the tribes of Tanzania; however, in all tribes the dead are alive in a way that they hear, see, and are able to cause pain, suffering, or happiness to the bereaved. Faithful Adventists continue facing problems from the community because they reject the indigenous beliefs.

The Kuria live in Tarime district of northern Tanzania. Like other African tribes they have particular cultural practices, which include circumcision for males and genital mutilation for females. Circumcision is removal of the foreskin of the male sexual organ and the partial or complete removal of the clitoris or labia for females. This practice is done as an initiation rite into adulthood. Any youth who did not undergo this rite was despised and called murisya, if male, or mosagane, if female. Children of uncircumcised mothers were considered a curse and would be killed or sent away from the land while the mother herself was to be expelled from the area because she was regarded as a curse and could rarely be married.

​The International Adventist Musicians Association (IAMA) served for more than three decades (1984-2019) as a forum for news, ideas, and discussion, and as a resource for information about music and musicians in the Seventh-day Adventist church.

The International Religious Liberty Association was instituted in 1893 by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Since then it has been an institution for advocating and promoting religious liberty all over the world.

​In 1930 the Home Missions Department of the Australasian Division issued the first four numbers of a new paper titled The Interpreter of the Times.

The Journal of Adventist Education® (JAE) is a professional, peer-reviewed educational journal published in English primarily for teachers and other educational personnel in the Seventh-day Adventist school system worldwide.

The King’s Heralds, a male quartet initially associated with the Voice of Prophecy radio program for over thirty-five years, has been a popular part of Adventist musical identity since 1937.

​This article presents an account of the influence and witness of some remarkable martyred and persecuted European Adventists during the political and religious epochs of the Ottoman Empire, Soviet Communism, and German Fascism.

​The Ministry of Healing, published in 1905, is considered Ellen White’s most comprehensive work on health and healthful living. The book is also a representation of the Seventh-day Adventist philosophy of health.

The Missionary Leader began as a sixteen-page monthly periodical (later reduced to eight pages) published from 1914 to 1951. It provided resources for local church elders, home mission secretaries, Sabbath School superintendents, and local young people’s leaders.

Building on different interpretative traditions, there have been two major views among Seventh-day Adventists on the number of the beast (the number 666) in Revelation 13:17, 18. While there are valid reasons to interpret it as the papal title Vicarius Filii Dei, as several Seventh-day Adventist writers have done over the years, others have viewed it as a triple six indicative of a Satanic trinity.

The Outlook was an occasional periodical of the First World War-era focusing on topical religious issues.

​After initial organization as a denomination in 1863, the Seventh-day Adventist Church underwent a period of organizational reform between 1901 and 1903 which resulted in a modified Church structure.