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Showing 3661 – 3680 of 4044

Adventist teachings were probably introduced to Trinidad and Tobago through literature sent from Southampton, England, around 1879 through the efforts of John Loughborough. As early as 1880 or 1881 a group of Sabbath keepers led by James P. Braithwaite met in Tobago. By the early 1880s, Adventist literature was sent to Trinidad and Tobago by the International Tract and Missionary Society (ITMS) in the United States.

George Byron Tripp was an American Seventh-day Adventist pioneer missionary who served as the first superintendent of Solusi Mission in Zimbabwe.

​Previously part of Mizo Conference, Tripura Region is a part of the Northeast India Union Section in the Southern Asia Division. It was organized in 2019 with headquarters in Agartala, West Tripura. It covers the state of Tripura in northeast India.

Owen Troy, Sr., was an influential minister and educator noted for innovation in linking evangelism with social service programs, music, and broadcasting.

Dr. Archibald W. Truman was a faculty member at the College of Medical Evangelists (later Loma Linda University School of Medicine) for the first decade of the school’s history (1909-1919), and subsequently served as a physician and medical director at sanitariums in the United States, Canada, and China, and as General Conference medical secretary for 14 years.

​Ernest Max Trummer was a missionary and administrator in South and Central America.

Tuaine Solomona was a native Cook Islander and missionary who helped Septimus Carr and other Seventh-day Adventist missionaries to Papua.

​The Cook Islands Maori or Rarotongan-language magazine, Tua tua –mou [Truth], commenced publication in 1907 and ceased around 1947.

Arthur Randolph Tucker was a leading missionary educator and administrator. He was the sixth principal and first president of Caribbean Union College (now the University of the Southern Caribbean), serving between 1944 and 1950 in Trinidad. Arthur and his wife Florence, who was a teacher, served in the United States, Japan, Korea, and Trinidad.

​Charles and Eulalia Tucker were missionaries at Aore in the New Hebrides and at Batuna in the Solomon Islands in the years leading up to World War II.

​J. L. Tucker was an Adventist pastor and founder of the Quiet Hour, an international evangelistic broadcast ministry.

​Juanito Tulio’s leadership was instrumental in conducting evangelism campaigns, building numerous churches, and developing denominational workers in the Philippines.

Alan Keith Tulloch was very highly regarded Adventist surgeon at the Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital (now Sydney Adventist Hospital).

​Tun Maung I was an Adventist administrator, teacher, and minister from Myanmar.

​Tun Sein was a pioneer teacher and administrator in Burma (now Myanmar).

Tunisia, officially the Republic of Tunisia, is the northernmost country in Africa. The history of the Adventist church in Tunisia began in 1928 when it was organized as part of the Mission and Services in Trans-Mediterranean Countries.

The Turkestan Mission was a church unit in Central Asia that operated from 1909 to 1925, when it became the Central Asian Conference.

Seventh-day Adventist work began in Turkey when a Greek shoemaker, Theodore Anthony, returned from America in February 1889 as a self-supporting missionary. Having immigrated only two years earlier at the age of 49, he accepted the Adventist message during evangelistic meetings near his home. Selling his business and all his belongings, Anthony’s only ambition was to share his newfound faith among friends and family in his native country.