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Showing 161 – 180 of 2966

​Ignacio Alvarado, a pioneering Hispanic Adventist in South Texas, built the first Adventist church in the Río Grande Valley, sparking the growth of Adventism among Spanish-speakers throughout the state.

George Washington Amadon contributed to the success of the Review and Herald publishing office during its earliest decades as a typesetter, foreman, administrator, editor, and author.

​Grace Edith Amadon was a musician, teacher, illustrator, and writer. She served in North America and South Africa.

Martha Dorner Byington was the first Adventist home school teacher and a founder of the Dorcas Society (later renamed Community Service Centers).

The Amazonas-Roraima Conference (Associação Amazonas Roraima or AAmaR) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission (União Noroeste Brasileira or UNoB).

​Amazonia Adventist College (Faculdade Adventista da Amazônia, or FAAMA) is a school for elementary, high school, and college education that offers day and boarding school. It belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil.

Karl Frederick Ambs, not to be confused with his uncle, Karl Friedrich Ambs (1884–1967), was an educator, business manager, missionary to Africa, and an assistant treasurer of the General Conference.

American Samoa is located in the south-central Pacific Ocean approximately 1,600 miles (2,600 kilometers) northeast of New Zealand and 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) southwest of Hawaii.

​William and Effa Ammundsen were missionaries to the Philippines. William was a pastor, educator, church administrator and college president, while Effa dedicated her ministry to young people.

Pastor John Amoah served in church administration in Ghana from 1965 to 1975 as president during the time that the Ghana Mission became the Ghana Conference.

Víctor Enrique Ampuero Matta was a pastor, educator, educational manager, mentor of Adventist youth, editor, writer, lecturer, and leading scholar in South American Adventism.

The Amur Mission was a Siberian church unit that comprised the easternmost Oblasts of Siberia from 1914 to 1925.

The Amyes Memorial Hospital was opened in 1939 at Kukudu on the Island of Kolombangara, Western Solomon Islands. Today it functions at the Kukudu Adventist Clinic.

​Sidney Amyes was a New Zealand national who strongly supported the Seventh-day Adventist Church with his means and influence in its early days in South New Zealand.

The Anambra-Imo Conference in the Eastern Nigeria Union Mission of the West-Central Africa Division existed from 2003 through 2014, at which point it was divided into Imo Conference and the Anambra Administrative Unit.

​Andaman and Nicobar Region is a part of the Southern Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It was organized in 1989. Its headquarters is in South Andaman, Andaman Islands, India.

Albert William Anderson was an Australian pastor, editor, writer, and administrator who served the Church in the Australasian Division.

Alfonso N. Anderson, with his wife Mayte Landis Anderson, devoted more than thirty years to pioneering mission work in Japan and in the Philippines, where they survived three years in the harsh conditions of World War II internment camps.

​Erik Alfred Anderson was a pioneering evangelist, pastor, administrator, and Bible teacher in Sweden.

Carl D. Anderson was a distinguished scholar and advocate of Seventh-day Adventist education who served as the head of the History Department at Oakwood College from 1969 to 1975.