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Joseph Bates was a mariner, social reformer, pamphleteer, and evangelist who co-founded the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

​Bates Memorial High School, named in honor of Adventist pioneer Joseph Bates, is a coeducational day school on the senior high school level, operated at Sangre Grande, Trinidad, West Indies.

Joseph Baker, an ordained Methodist minister who joined the Millerite movement around 1843, was for a few years prominent in the early development of Sabbatarian Adventism.

Joseph Birchard Frisbie, one of the earliest Seventh-day Adventist ministers, served the church for twenty-nine years.

Colonel Ezra L. H. Chamberlain played a variety of influential supporting roles in the emergence of Sabbatarian Adventism.

A restorationist or primitivist movement that emerged independently in several sections of North America about 1800. It is considered as the first truly indigenous American religious movement. The focus was a quest for apostolic purity.

Merritt Eaton Cornell was a tent evangelist, leading debater, and author of five doctrinal books.

Eli Curtis was a Millerite who initially sympathized with Bridegroom Adventists including James and Ellen White but who later became a spiritualist.

William C. Davis was a Presbyterian minister in the southern United States whose expositions on biblical prophecy and early opposition to slavery made him a precursor to both the abolitionist and Second Advent movements that arose in America during the 1830s. In a work published in 1811, Davis became the first American author to contend that the 2300-day prophecy of Daniel 8:14 would be fulfilled in the 1840s.

John Warren Bacheller, Jr. and his wife, Arvilla Marilda (born Lane), were early Sabbatarian Adventists and active in the formation of the denomination. Warren worked as a printer for James White in Rochester and later became a lifelong employee of the Review and Herald Publishing House.

Cyrus Kingsbury Farnsworth was a farmer from Washington, New Hampshire, who became an early and stalwart Sabbatarian Adventist.

William Farnsworth was a farmer from Washington, New Hampshire who was an early Sabbatarian Adventist.

Will Keith Kellogg (known as W. K. Kellogg) was a businessman, entrepreneur, and co-inventor of flaked breakfast cereals. His invention and marketing of cornflakes led to the founding of the Kellogg Company (which does business as Kellogg’s) in 1906.

​Elizabeth Haines was an early Adventist at whose house on Danforth Street, in Portland, Maine, Ellen White received her first vision as well as several others.

​From the era of its pioneers to the present, the standard position of the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been that the annual ceremonial sabbaths of ancient Israel pointed to the Messiah and terminated when Jesus Christ was crucified, whereas the requirement to loyally observe the seventh-day Sabbath retains its validity as an integral part of the Ten Commandments.

​Leonard Wood Hastings was a farmer and Millerite believer who became a stalwart Sabbatarian and, later, Seventh-day Adventist. He was a close friend and supporter of Joseph Bates and James and Ellen White. His wife Elvira was a close friend of Ellen White.

​David Hewitt, the first Sabbatarian Adventist convert in Battle Creek, Michigan, became a prominent figure in the early development of Seventh-day Adventism in that city.

Stockbridge Howland was a layman who organized Sabbath conferences and provided hospitality for traveling preachers during the formative years of the Sabbath-keeping Adventist movement in Maine.

​After initial organization as a denomination in 1863, the Seventh-day Adventist Church underwent a period of organizational reform between 1901 and 1903 which resulted in a modified Church structure.

Daniel R. Palmer was a prosperous shopkeeper noted for generous support of the Adventist movement.

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