View All Photos

East Indonesia Union Conference Office

Photo courtesy of East Indonesia Union Conference.

East Indonesia Union Conference

By Edison Takasanakeng, and Cornelis Ramschie

×

Edison Takasanakeng, Master of Public Health (Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Philippines; B.A. in theology, Universitas Klabat, Airmadidi, Manado, Indonesia) served at Northern Islands Mission as a church pastor for 11 years, executive secretary for 2 years, and mission president for 8 years. He was associate editor at Indonesia Publishing House for 4 years, and now (2020) serves as NDR-IEL coordinator for East Indonesia Union Conference. He is married to Johana Bawole and lives at Matungkas, Minahasa Utara, Indonesia.

Cornelis Ramschie, Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction (Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Cavite, Philippines; B.Th. and M.P.Th., Universitas Klabat), is the Education director of East Indonesia Union Conference, Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. He served as a church pastor, chaplain, teacher, and executive secretary of Maluku Mission. He is married to Trisne Mona.

First Published: November 3, 2020

The East Indonesia Union Conference was established in 1964 when the Far Eastern Division divided the Indonesia Union Mission into the East Indonesia Union Mission and the West Indonesia Union Mission.

The East Indonesia Union Conference is composed of parts of Central and Eastern Indonesia, which includes two large islands, namely West Papua and Sulawesi, as well as several islands such as the Maluku and North Maluku Islands and Northern Islands. The total land area of the union is 705,658.30 square kilometers (272,456.19 square miles). The area’s total population in 2017 was 26,435,470, which is 10.09 percent of the Indonesian population, consisting of 13,272,708 men and 13,162,762 women.1 In 2018 there were 926 congregations and 235 companies, with a total membership of 124,600.2 In 2018 there were 215 schools, 2 tertiary schools, 1 hospital, 2 medical clinics, 1 language school, and 1 radio station (Radio Angkat Nafiri) in the East Indonesia Union Conference.3

The number of active employees throughout the East Indonesia Union Conference in 2016 was 1,390 people, consisting of 272 holding ministerial credentials, 134 holding ministerial licenses, 634 holding missionary credentials, 283 holding missionary licenses, and 67 other employees, including part-time workers. This number does not include 545 literature evangelists.4

Different religions occupy this territory. The majority of the population follows Islam, but there are also Catholics, Protestant Christianity with its hundreds of sects, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and others.5 Each province covered in this territory has its own unique culture, language, and dialects. In just the West Papua region, there are approximately 271 languages.6

Organizational History

Even though Indonesia has undergone various political crises since independence in the early 1960s, the message of the Seventh-day Adventist Church continued to make progress. In 1963 the membership of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Indonesia Union Mission had reached more than 21,000 people spread across 349 churches,7 and by the end of 1963, the membership had reached 24,535 spread across 365 churches.8 This growth increased the demand for service and ministry. To increase the efficiency of service, the leaders of the Far Eastern Division in November 1963 divided the territory of the Indonesia Union into two unions: the West Indonesia Union Mission based in Jakarta and the East Indonesia Union Mission headquartered in Manado.9

In January 1964, the East Indonesia Union Mission was officially organized, with the region including Celebes (Sulawesi), Maluku Islands, and Sangihe-Talaud Islands,10 with a total membership of 13,043 people in 195 congregations.11 The union was divided into 4 missions: Ambon Mission (Now Maluku Mission, organized 1929), North Celebes Mission (organized 1923, now divided into the Minahasa Conference, Manado and North Maluku Conference, and North Minahasa and Bitung Mission), Sangihe-Talaud Islands Mission (now Northern Islands Mission, organized 1964), and South Celebes Mission (now South Sulawesi Conference, organized 1939). The first union office was at Djalan Kelabat 153, Manado.12

The first leaders and staff of the East Indonesia Union Mission were as follows: President, A. M. Bartlett. Secretary-treasurer and auditor, P. L. Tambunan. Executive Committee: A. M. Bartlett, L. E. Barber, P. G. Emerson, J. B. Laloan, Freddy Macarewa, J. Manembu, J. D. Matusea, Alfrits Pasuhuk, M. Patty, John Raranta, Walter Raranta, P. L. Tambunan. Departmental secretaries: Educational, Y.P.M.V., and National Service Organization, P. G. Emerson; Home Missionary and Sabbath School, J. D. Matusea; Ministerial, A. M. Bartlett; Publishing and Public Relations, Wolter Raranta; Radio-TV and Bible Correspondence School, J. D. Matusea. Ordained ministers in Indonesia Union office: A. M. Bartlett, P. G. Emerson, Freddy Macarewa, and J. D. Matusea.13

God's work in the East Indonesia Union Mission developed rapidly as many souls were baptized and many new territories were entered. That’s why soon after being organized, in January 1965, the Executive Committee of the East Indonesia Union Mission requested the division to approve the establishment of a new mission, Central Sulawesi Mission.14 This new mission was organized, covering the service areas of Buol; Toli-Toli; Donggala; Luwuk, Banggai; and Poso; based in the city of Palu.15

When East Indonesia Union Mission was organized in 1964, the West Irian (now Papua) region was not yet part of this union because of the uncertainty while Irian was struggling with the political situation at that time. Irian had just passed the war over the seizure of government territory between the Indonesian government and the Dutch government. On May 1, 1963, UNTEA (United Nations Temporary Executive Administration) handed over West Irian to Indonesia, provided that a popular vote was held in 1969.16 So until that time, West Irian was still a mission attached to the Far Eastern Division.17 Later, in 1974, West Irian officially became part of the East Indonesia Union Mission.18

The betrayal of the Indonesian Communist party on September 30, 1965, caused great political upheaval in Indonesia. Almost a year later, on March 11, 1966, Sukarno, the president of Indonesia, issued a warrant authorizing General Suharto (of the Indonesian Military) to take all necessary measures to restore national security.19 On this warrant, General Suharto began to purge the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI). This caused a problem for the work of the gospel because many Seventh-day Adventist Church members were accused of being involved in the Communist party, which made it very difficult for them to hold evangelistic meetings.20 But God always has His way to sustain His work. Although on the one hand, the political situation at that time caused many difficulties for church members accused of being involved in the PKI, on the other hand, it gave rise to a new government system called Orde Baru (the new order). This new government recognized that mental development is important in that it underlies physical development. The system, in essence, aims to create a positive national lifestyle that is devoted to God, mentality, and positive character.21 Since then, the church evangelistic movement has developed.

The Far Eastern Division annual meeting held in Davao City, South Philippines, at the end of 1967 determined that 1968 would be a year of evangelism. This initiative united all gospel workers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church throughout Indonesia in the evangelistic ranks. The multipoint plan encompassed personal contact and life witness along with crusades within and outside the church, including in the educational institutions, hospitals, and publishing houses.22 This evangelistic breakthrough added 1,600 new members throughout East Indonesia Union Mission in 1968.23 In 1969, there were 2,204 souls baptized,24 and in 1970, an additional 1,104 souls were baptized. At the end of 1970, there were 18,092 members in the union.25

The increase in the number of church members, especially in the North Celebes Mission, necessitated the mission to be divided into two missions. On September 29, 1970, the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee divided the North Sulawesi Mission into two missions with the territory as follows: Tanawangko, Manado, Dimembe, Minawerot, and Bitung districts, with the surrounding islands and the isolated areas of Gorontalo and Halmahera (North Maluku), compose the North Minahasa Mission. All the area beginning with the Tomohon and Tondano districts to the south as far as the Kotamobagu district compose the South Minahasa Mission.26

The Adventist work also has been immensely impacted by national laws and political intrigues, mostly in the territory where the majority of the population is Islamic. These laws ban building new church buildings. To build a church, the organization must meet difficult requirements, such as providing the names and identity cards of the users of the church building. There must be at least 90 Adventist Church members authorized by local officials in accordance with the regional boundary level. Also, at least 60 non-Adventists in the local community authorized by the village head must support the building of the church. Members are not allowed to hold worship services even in private houses.27

However, the climate toward Seventh-day Adventists and other Christians is changing as more Adventists work in government and parliament from the national level down to district and even subdistrict levels. Some political policies and regulations are bringing about some benefits to the spread of the gospel.

Reorganizing the Union

Since it was organized in 1964, the East Indonesia Union Mission has developed very well. Thousands of people have been baptized each year as new churches are formed and new territories are entered. Membership growth, financial capacity, and spiritual maturity of members have improved.

From 1987 to 1997, the membership of the church increased by almost 30,000 (from 52,973 in 1987 to 80,711 in 1997).28 In addition to this rapid growth in the number of church members, at the same time, the financial capacity of the East Indonesia Union Mission also grew. Starting in 1994, the East Indonesia Union Mission began a comprehensive financial stabilization program in the East Indonesia Mission. The goal was that by 1999, all missions and institutions in the union would reach 100 percent working capital and have no debt.29 As a result, the financial indicator of East Indonesia Union Mission on October 31, 1999, showed working capital of 80.91 percent, liquidity of 76.96 percent, and self-support of 133 percent.30

Based on various developments in the East Indonesia Union Mission, the Southern Asia-Pacific Division (SSD) in December 1997 reorganized this union from a union mission to a union conference. The General Conference Session on June 29, 2000, voted (1) “to recognize and record conference status for the East Indonesia Union Mission, effective December 1, 1997,” and (2) “to accept the East Indonesia Union Conference (SSD) into the world sisterhood of unions of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.”31

Before the union received conference status, three missions changed status from mission to conference: on January 14–17, 1994, the South Sulawesi Mission became South Sulawesi Conference, headquartered in Ujung Pandang City (now Makassar);32 on February 20–21, 1995, the North Minahasa Mission became North Minahasa and North Maluku Conference,33 and on September 1, 1995, the South Minahasa Mission became the South Minahasa Conference.34

Organizing New Missions

Because of the wider spread of the gospel and the increased need for service, the union leadership reorganized several existing missions and conferences into new areas.

In 2003, the East Indonesia Union Executive Committee35 voted to divide South Minahasa Conference into the South Minahasa Conference and the Bolaang Mongondow Gorontalo Field, effective on January 1, 2004. That new field covers the present-day East Bolmong Regency, North Bolmong Regency, South Bolmong Regency, Kotamobagu Municipal, the whole Gorontalo Province, and Modoinding Subdistrict of South Minahasa Regency.36 Based on the SSD committee action of November 6, 2015, this new field upgraded to mission status on February 19–20, 2016.37

On July 13, 2011, the Executive Committee of the East Indonesia Union organized Luwu Tana Toraja as an attached field (district), effective as of September 2011.38 The headquarters was located at Jalan Tandipau No. 45 Palopo, South Sulawesi, Indonesia.39 In 2014, the Southern Asia-Pacific Division approved the change in the status of Luwu Tana Toraja District to a mission40 and agreed to organize Luwu Tana Toraja District into a mission effective in 2015.41

In the 2011 union year-end meeting, the East Indonesia Union Conference made a recommendation to the SSD Committee to approve the establishment of the West Papua Mission.42 The SSD approved this recommendation and established this new mission on December 12, 2012.

On August 18, 2012, the North Minahasa Bitung District was formed in preparation for the new mission separate from the Manado and North Minahasa Conference.43 After assessing the North Minahasa Bitung Field as fulfilling the requirements, the Southern Asia Pacific Division, on November 7, 2016, approved the revised report and application of North Minahasa Bitung Field to become a mission as well as the answers to the East Indonesia Union’s major recommendations. Further, SSD authorized the East Indonesia Union Conference to organize this field into a new mission as soon as it was practical.44 Based on this, the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee voted to organize the North Minahasa and Bitung Mission apart from the Manado and North Minahasa Conference on February 14–16, 2017.45

Union Headquarters

Since it was organized in 1964, the East Indonesia Union has been headquartered in the city of Manado but has moved its office location within the city several times. The union office officially opened September 10, 1964,46 at the temporary office location on Jl. Komo no 72.47 A permanent office building was built on Jl. Walanda Maramis no. 38 (now Jl. B. W. Lapian no. 38); that building now houses the Manado English Conversation School. After a few years on Jl. B. W. Lapian no 38, the union leaders decided to build a new office on Jl. February 14th, Teling, Manado. Construction of the building began in 1993, and it was inaugurated on August 31, 1995,48 by P. D. Chun, president of the Southern Asia-Pacific Division at that time.49 After occupying the office for several years, in 2003 the East Indonesia Union Executive Committee voted to convert the building into the Manado Adventist Hospital. That is why on May 23, 2005,50 the union executive committee voted to move the address of the union office from Jl. February 14th to a temporary address at Jl. Martadinata no. 16, Manado, and this new office was inaugurated on August 2, 2005.51 This building was previously a union employee housing complex. In the year 2008, Tonce Tenoch, a church member who was a successful businessman, agreed to sell the land and building of his place of business to the union for a very low price at that time, and on September 10, 2008,52 the East Indonesia Union Executive Committee voted to buy that land and building, located at Jl. Sarapung no. 31 Manado, to become a permanent office. This is still the union office location in 2020. But as God’s work develops and it becomes necessary to adjust to the progress of the development of the city of Manado, it is possible that in the future, the East Indonesia Union Conference will look for another place that is larger and has better prospects.

Establishment of Union Institutions

Mount Klabat College (now Klabat University)53

The tensions and fortunes of politics and history played important roles in the founding and development of Mount Klabat College. Even before the creation of the East Indonesia Union Mission in 1964 in the eastern part of what had been the Indonesia Union Mission, ideas and plans for a school of higher learning were being discussed. Upon the appointment of A. M. Bartlett as president of the new union in 1964, more definite plans were laid.54 The Executive Committee of this new union then voted to open East Indonesia Union College in September 1965.55 E. W. Higgins Jr. was called from the Palau Islands to serve as the college president, arriving in January 1965.

Adventist English Conversation School56

Ten years after the East Indonesia Union was effectively established, the Executive Committee of the East Indonesia Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church held a meeting and voted to establish Adventist English Conversation School for the East Indonesia Union.57 Dale J. Bidwell, the union treasurer, was appointed to be the director, and the first English class began on March 1, 1974, in the conference room of union office located at Jl. Walanda Maramis, No. 38, Tikala, Manado.58 Later, the government changed the name of the street to B. W. Lapian St. No. 38, Tikala, Manado.59 The first teacher, Janet Weighall, from Loma Linda University, California, United States of America, was a foreign student missionary.60 In order to have proper classrooms and an office for the successful English school, the Union Executive Committee voted on February 12, 1974, to recommend the construction of a building at the union office compound.61

Rumah Sakit Advent Manado (Manado Adventist Hospital)62

The idea of establishing an Adventist hospital in the city of Manado emerged in the early 1970s. Anthon Waworoendeng, president of the Eastern Indonesian Mission, realized that there was a need for the Seventh-day Adventist Church to provide medical care for the people in this area. This dream was made possible by the acquisition of a 27,000-square-meter (6.7-acre) piece of land from Tek Eng Tan.63 Thus, the plan was set in motion,64 but it was many years before the Manado Adventist Hospital opened its doors.

The union leadership in 2003 took an important step toward realizing the plan by handing over the union office building to be used as an Adventist Hospital. Then, the Union Executive Committee voted to convert the building into the Manado Adventist Hospital.65

The hospital officially opened on December 3, 2007, and received the first patients two days later. The opening of the hospital was a culmination of meticulous planning and groundwork of 34 years. In 2020, Manado Adventist Hospital was providing service to more than 700,000 patients,66 and that number has continued to grow.

Radio Angkat Nafiri

The idea of establishing Radio Angkat Nafiri began in 2008 when the executive secretary of the East Indonesia Union Conference, Samuel Yotam Bindosano, visited the Quiet Hour in the U.S.A. Upon his return from the Quiet Hour, he discussed this idea with his fellow union officers. In 2009, the director of Adventist World Radio (AWR) visited Manado to hold an evangelistic crusade. This idea was discussed with him and received his advice and support. Proposals were submitted to AWR for assistance and guidance in establishing a radio station.67 After some time struggling, finally, in 2011, the East Indonesia Union Executive Committee voted to form an Adventist radio founding team, which consisted of Stephen Salainti, Micler Lakat, Novry Kaumpungan, and Warouw Polii.68 This team was assigned to take the steps needed so that the Adventist radio station could be established in Manado. As a result, PT Radio Naik Nafiri (RAN FM) was formally created through a deed of establishment no. 04, dated September 23, 2011, signed by notary Natalia M. Rumagit S.H., M. Si.M. Kn.69 Since then, Manado Adventist Radio began broadcasting on 90.6 FM from the village of Warembungan, Pineleng, 11.4 kilometers (7 miles) from the East Indonesia Union Office.

Leadership

Presidents: Alvin Marbert Bartlett (1964–1970); Anthon Waworoendeng (1971–1975); Jonah S. Maramis (1976–1980); Barnabas Malingkas (1981–1983); Alex Rantung (1984–1996); Reinhold Kesaulya (1997–2002); Bobby J. Sepang (2003–2007); Noldy Sakul (2008–2015); Samuel Yotam Bindosano (2016–)

Executive Secretaries: P. L. Tambunan (1964–1968); Wolter Raranta (1969–1975); J. D. A. Matusea (1976–1983); J. S. Maramis (1984–1990); Bobby Sepang (1991); Reinhold Kesaulya (1992–1996); Noldy Sakul (1997–2005); S. Y. Bindosano (2005–2015); H. Sibilang (2016–)

Treasurers: P. L. Tambunan (1964–1970); Dale A. Bidwell (1970–1974); James A. Greene (1975–1979); C. G. Oliver (1980–1984); Moldy R. Mambu (1985–2001); Herry Sumanti (2002–2015); Ventje B. Raranta (2016–)

Sources

Biro Pusat Statistik (BPS). Statistical Year Book of Indonesia 2018.

East Indonesia Union Conference. Year-End Report of the Union President, 2018. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Editorial staff, Kebenaran Oleh Iman, 1989.

Fathoni, Rifai Shodiq. “Pembebasan Irian Barat (1945–1963 M).” Wawasan Sejarah, October 13, 2017. http://wawasansejarah.com/pembebasan-irian-barat/.

First Business Meeting, Fifth-seventh General Conference Session, June 29, 2000. Action 110-00G East Indonesia Union Conference—New Union Conference, 00-1006. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCSM/2000/GCSM20000629.pdf.

Gibson, Jesse O. 106th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists. Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1968.

———. 107th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists. Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1969.

———. 108th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists. Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1970.

Joint Regulation of the Minister of Religion and Minister of Internal Affairs No. 9, year 2006. Distributed by the Religious Department of the Government of the Republic of Indonesia to all religious denomination leaders in Indonesia. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

“Jumlah Penganut Agama di Indonesia Tiap Provinsi.” TumoutouNews. https://tumoutounews.com/2017/11/08/jumlah-penganut-agama-di-indonesia-tiap-provinsi/.

Mambu, Moldy R. Treasury Report, East Indonesia Union Year-end Meeting, 1994. Documents Archive of East Indonesia Union Conference, no. S3 – F1-07.

———. Treasury Report, East Indonesia Union Year-End Meeting, 1997. Documents Archive of East Indonesia Union Conference, no. S3 – F1-10.

McChesney, Andrew. “In Indonesia, Doctors Leave Hospital to Lead Evangelistic Series.” Seventh-day Adventist Church News. https://www.adventistmission.org/%E2%80%8Bin-indonesia-doctors-leave-hospital-to-lead-evangelistic-series.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2003. November 28, 2003. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2011. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2012. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2014. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee. 2015.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2016. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee. July 13, 2011. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee. East Indonesia Union Conference archives. Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

Minutes of the Southern Asia Pacific Division 2014 action no. 2014-611. Quoted in East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee Minutes.

Neufeld, Don. F. Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1976.

Notosusanto, Nugroho. Sejarah Nasional Indonesia 3. Departemen Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, 1992.

Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research. 2018 Annual Statistical Report: 154th Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2016 and 2017.

Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research. 2019 Annual Statistical Report: Advance Release of Membership Statistics by Division for 2018.

PT Radio Angkat Nafiri, Data dan Informasi, Akta Pendirian, September 23, 2011. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Rosmanuddin, Safriandi A. “Berapa Jumlah Bahasa Daerah di Indonesia.” October 30, 2017. http://portalsatu.com.

Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. 2nd rev. ed. Hagerstown, Md.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press, 2016.

Southeast Asia Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists, action no. 2016-108, quoted in the Southern Asia-Pacific Division decision letter sent to East Indonesia Union Conference. East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

Statistical Secretary. 101st Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists. Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1963.

Statistical Secretary. 102nd Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists. Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1964.

Syafiie, Inu Kencana. Ekologi Pemerntahan Indonesia. Penerbit Pustaka Reka Cipta, 2019.

Tambunan, Emil H. Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia: Perintisan dan Pengembangannya. Jakarta: Pusat Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 1999.

Tambunan Emil H. et al. Gereja Masehi Adventi Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia: Sejarah Perintisan dan Pengembangannya. Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 1997.

“Union Missions Directory.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1964, 12.

Union Record: Transaction made on October 2, 1973, letter no. 02/X/K5/1973.

Notes

  1. Biro Pusat Statistik (BPS), Statistical Year Book of Indonesia 2018, CV. Dharmaputra, 9.

  2. Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research, 2019 Annual Statistical Report: Advance Release of Membership Statistics by Division for 2018, 15.

  3. East Indonesia Union Conference, Year End Report of the Union President, 2018, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  4. Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research, 2018 Annual Statistical Report: 154th Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2016 and 2017, 69.

  5. “Jumlah Penganut Agama di Indonesia Tiap Provinsi,” TumoutouNews, https://tumoutounews.com/2017/11/08/jumlah-penganut-agama-di-indonesia-tiap-provinsi/.

  6. Safriandi A. Rosmanuddin, Berapa Jumlah Bahasa Daerah di Indonesia, October 30, 2017, http://portalsatu.com.

  7. Emil H. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia: Perintisan dan Pengembangannya (Jakarta: Pusat Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 1999), 187.

  8. Statistical Secretary, 101st Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1963), 16.

  9. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 188.

  10. Don R. Neufeld, ed., Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, vol. 10 of the Commentary Reference Series (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1976), s.v. “Far Eastern Division.”

  11. Statistical Secretary, 102nd Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1964), 16.

  12. “Union Missions Directory,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1964, 12; “East Indonesia Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1964), 115.

  13. “East Indonesia Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1964), 115.

  14. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, action no. 64-60, 1964, East Indonesia Union Mission archives.

  15. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 368.

  16. Rifai Shodiq Fathoni, “Pembebasan Irian Barat (1945–1963 M),” Wawasan Sejarah, October 13, 2017, http://wawasansejarah.com/pembebasan-irian-barat/.

  17. “West Irian Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1966), 140–141.

  18. “East Indonesia Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1974), 158.

  19. Inu Kencana Syafiie, Ekologi Pemerntahan Indonesia (Penerbit Pustaka Reka Cipta, 2019), 273.

  20. A. Sasambe, interview by Edison Takasanakeng, Talaud, July 12, 2007.

  21. Nugroho Notosusanto, Sejarah Nasional Indonesia 3 (Departemen Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, 1992), 228.

  22. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 194.

  23. Jesse O. Gibson, 106th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1968), 10.

  24. Jesse O. Gibson, 107th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1969), 10.

  25. Jesse O. Gibson, 108th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1970), 10.

  26. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, 1970, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  27. Joint Regulation of the Minister of Religion and Minister of Internal Affairs No. 9, year 2006, as distributed by the Religious Department of the Government of the Republic of Indonesia to all religious denomination leaders in Indonesia, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  28. http://www.adventiststatistics.org/view_Summary.asp?FieldInstID=261792.

  29. Moldy R. Mambu, Treasury Report, East Indonesia Union Year-End Meeting, 1994, Documents Archive of East Indonesia Union Conference, no. S3 – F1-07.

  30. Moldy R. Mambu, Treasury Report, East Indonesia Union Year-End Meeting, 1997, Documents Archive of East Indonesia Union Conference, no. S3 – F1-10.

  31. First Business Meeting, Fifth-seventh General Conference Session, June 29, 2000, action 110-00G East Indonesia Union Conference—New Union Conference, 00-1006, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCSM/2000/GCSM20000629.pdf.

  32. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 207.

  33. Ibid., 208.

  34. Ibid.

  35. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Executive Committee 2003, November 28, 2003, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  36. Ibid.

  37. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee, action no. 2015-121.

  38. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2011, action no. 2011-098, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  39. “Luwu Tana Toraja Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press, 2016), 412.

  40. Minutes of the Southern Asia Pacific Division 2014, action no. 2014-611, quoted in East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee Minutes, action no. 214-103.

  41. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2014, action no. 2014–103, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  42. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2011, action no. 2011-075, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  43. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Executive Committee 2012, action no. 2012-078, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  44. Southeast Asia Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists action no. 2016-108, quoted in the Southern Asia-Pacific Division decision letter sent to East Indonesia Union Conference, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  45. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee 2016, action no. 2016-132, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  46. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, January 6, 1964, action no. 64-31, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  47. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, July 22, 1964, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  48. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, August 2, 1995, action no. 1995-027, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  49. Emil H. Tambunan et al., Gereja Masehi Adventi Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia: Sejarah Perintisan dan Pengembangannya (Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 1997), 200.

  50. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference, Executive Committee, May 23, 2005, action no. 2005-040, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  51. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, May 23, 2005, action no. 2005-063, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  52. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee, September 10, 2018, action no. 2008-116, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  53. See also Universitas Klabat.

  54. SDA Encyclopedia, Second Revised Edition 1996.pdf

  55. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission, Executive Committee, action no. 64-83, 1964, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  56. See also article on Adventist English Conversation School.

  57. Editorial staff, Kebenaran Oleh Iman, 1989.

  58. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 485.

  59. Tambunan et al., Sejarah Perintisan dan Pengembangannya, 210.

  60. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia, 485.

  61. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Mission Executive Committee, AECS Committee, no. 74-033, East Indonesia Union Conference Archives.

  62. See also the article on Manado Adventist Hospital.

  63. See Union Record: Transaction made on October 2, 1973, letter no. 02/X/K5/1973.

  64. Dr. Antou, former president of Manado Adventist Hospital, interview by Yohanes Paruntu, April 19, 2018.

  65. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee, March 12, 2003, action nos. 2003-037 and 2003-038, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  66. Andrew McChesney, “In Indonesia, Doctors Leave Hospital to Lead Evangelistic Series,” Seventh-day Adventist Church News, https://www.adventistmission.org/%E2%80%8Bin-indonesia-doctors-leave-hospital-to-lead-evangelistic-series.

  67. Samuel Yotam Bindosano, president of the East Indonesia Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventist, interview by the author, January 21, 2020.

  68. Minutes of the East Indonesia Union Conference Executive Committee, July 13, 2011, action no. 2011-73, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

  69. PT Radio Angkat Nafiri, Data dan Informasi, Akta Pendirian, September 23, 2011, cover page, East Indonesia Union Conference archives.

×

Takasanakeng, Edison, Cornelis Ramschie. "East Indonesia Union Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 03, 2020. Accessed April 08, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7APV.

Takasanakeng, Edison, Cornelis Ramschie. "East Indonesia Union Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 03, 2020. Date of access April 08, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7APV.

Takasanakeng, Edison, Cornelis Ramschie (2020, November 03). East Indonesia Union Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved April 08, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7APV.