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Administrative Office, New Britain New Ireland Mission, Kokopo, 2012. Built after volcanic eruption in Rabaul.  

Photo courtesy of Barry Oliver.

New Britain New Ireland Mission, South Pacific Division

By Barry Oliver

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Barry Oliver, Ph.D., retired in 2015 as president of the South Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists, Sydney, Australia. An Australian by birth Oliver has served the Church as a pastor, evangelist, college teacher, and administrator. In retirement, he is a conjoint associate professor at Avondale College of Higher Education. He has authored over 106 significant publications and 192 magazine articles. He is married to Julie with three adult sons and three grandchildren.

The New Britain New Ireland Mission (NBNI) is the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) administrative entity for a large part of the New Guinea Islands region in Papua New Guinea located in the South West Pacific Ocean.1

The territory of New Britain New Ireland Mission is East New Britain, West New Britain, and New Ireland Provinces of Papua New Guinea.2 It is a part of and responsible to the Papua New Guinea Union Lae, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. The Papua New Guinea Union Mission comprises the Seventh-day Adventist Church entities in the country of Papua New Guinea. There are nine local missions and one local conference in the union. They are the Central Papuan Conference, the Bougainville Mission, the New Britain New Ireland Mission, the Northern and Milne Bay Mission, Morobe Mission, Madang Manus Mission, Sepik Mission, Eastern Highlands Simbu Mission, Western Highlands Mission, and South West Papuan Mission. The administrative office of NBNI is located at Butuwin Street, Kokopo 613, East New Britain, Papua New Guinea. The postal address is P.O. Box 205, Kokopo 613, Papua New Guinea. The postal address of the regional sub-office at Kavieng in the New Ireland Province is P.O. Box 41, Kavieng 631, NIP, Papua New Guinea.3 The postal address of the regional sub-office in Kimbe in the West New Britain Province is P.O Box 41 Kimbe 6, WNBP, Papua New Guinea.

The mission operates under General Conference and South Pacific Division (SPD) operating policies. Those policies state that the officers of NBNI are elected by the Papua New Guinea Union Mission.4 “The mission president elected by the union is a member of the union committee and is the union representative in the conduct of the work in the mission. The president shall, with the local mission committee, supervise and carry forward the work in the local mission.”5 Mission associate officers and departmental personnel are elected at a duly called session of the mission where representatives from all churches in the mission are present.6

In 2018, the NBNI had 109 organized churches and 184 companies. Church membership at the end of 2018 was 14,119. The mission had ninety-nine active employees. Its tithe receipts for 2016 totaled US$1,343,400. Its tithe and offerings per capita were US$ 117.93.7

The Institutions of the New Britain New Ireland Mission

As of 2018, the NBNI supported twenty-two primary schools and one secondary school in the territory of the mission. The total number of students in the primary schools at the last report was 2,201. There were 125 teaching staff in the schools.8 The mission also supported for medical clinics.

The schools were:9

Boliu Primary School, located at Boliu on the island of Mussau, New Ireland Province, had an enrollment of twenty-three with a teaching staff of ten.

Ediwa Community School, located at Ediwa, Mussau, had an enrollment of eighty-nine with a teaching staff of six.

Ganai Community School, located at Ganae on the Gazelle Peninsula, East New Britain, had an enrollment of 118 with a teaching staff of seven.

Harrison Primary School, located at Kimbe, West New Britain, had an enrollment of 286 with a teaching staff of ten.

Isu Primary School, formerly Silovuti School (name was changed in 1982),10 is located at Isu in the Kombe District of West New Britain. The school had an enrollment of ninety-six with a teaching staff of six in 2018.

Kambubu Adventist Secondary School, located at Kokopo on the east coast of the Gazelle Peninsula of East New Britain, had an enrollment 534 and a teaching staff of eighteen in January 2020.11

Kavieng Primary School, located at Kavieng at the northern end of the island of New Ireland, had an enrollment of 251 with a teaching staff of ten.

Kivia Primary School, located at Vitu Island, West New Britain, had an enrollment of 111 with a teaching staff of six.

Konkavul Primary School, located on the island of New Hanover, had an enrolment of eighty-three with a teaching staff of four.

Kumbuba Community School, located at Vitu Islsnd, West New Britain, had an enrollment of forty-two with a teaching staff of two.

Loaua Community School, located at Loaua on the island of Mussau, the school had an enrollment of eighty-four with a teaching staff of four.

Lomana Community School, located at Lomakunauru on the island of Mussau, had an enrollment of thrity-two with a teaching staff of two.

Lovarang Community School, located at Lovarang on the island of Mussau, had an enrollment of thirty-eight with a teaching staff of four.

Magean Primary School, located at Magean on the island of Mussau, had an enrolment of thirty-four with a teaching staff of one.

Napapar Primary School, located at Napapar on the Gazelle Peninsula of East New Britain, had an enrollment of 167 with a teaching staff of nine.

Nighilani Primary School, located at Nighilani on the island of Bali, West New Britain, the school had an enrollment of 138 with a teaching staff of nine.

Palakau Community School, located at Palkau on the island of Mussau, the school had an enrollment of fifty-five with a teaching staff of two.

Rali Primary School, located at Pomio, East New Britain, had an enrollment of twenty-six with a teaching staff of two.

Rongoe Primary School, located on the island of Emirau, had an enrolment of 119 with a teaching staff of eight.

Rugen Harbour Primary School, located at Put Put on the East coast of the Gazelle Peninsula of east New Britain, had an enrolment of 128 with a teaching staff of eight.

Saio Community School, located at Mussau, had an enrollment of nineteen with a teaching staff of three.

Sonoma Primary School, located at Sonoma Adventist College on the Gazelle Peninsula of east New Britain, had an enrollment of 239 with a teaching staff of ten.

Ulu Primary School, located at Bialla, West New Britain, had an enrollment of twenty-three with a teaching staff of two.

Aidposts and Clinics:

Bereme Aidpost. P.O. Box 413; Kimbe 621; Papua New Guinea.

Hoiya Health Centre. C/o P.O. Box 205; Kokopo 613; Papua New Guinea.

Mu Aidpost. C/o P.O. Box 205; Kokopo 613; Papua New Guinea.

Nighilani Aidpost. P.O. Box 413; Kimbe 621; Papua New Guinea.

Arrival and Early History of the Adventist Church in East New Britain

At 1:00 p.m. on June 4, 1929, the mission vessel Melanesia arrived in Simpson Harbor, Rabaul with the first group of Seventh-day Adventist missionaries to visit New Britain with the intention of establishing a mission. Francis and Eva Allum had visited Rabaul in 1906 when they were on their way to China. Allum, reflecting on his visit, later wrote, “We reached New Britain. It is the most beautiful place I have ever seen...I wonder who will be called to this place to tell this people the truths of the third angel's message.”12

A. G. Stewart, who was aboard the Melanesia in 1929 wrote:

Our ship's company comprised our veteran pioneer missionary, Captain G. F. Jones, who has again been duly appointed by the Australasian Union Conference to pioneer the work in this part of our already widely spread island mission field ; Pastor G. Peacock, the superintendent of the Solomon Islands Mission; Brother H. E. Barham, the ship's engineer; Sister Barham; Oti and Salau, two Solomon Island teachers recently appointed to assist Pastor Jones; Rangoso and his brother Jimuru, our Solomon Island translators; the boat's crew of nine boys ; and the writer, making a complement of eighteen souls.13

The next day Jones, Peacock, and Stewart met with the government administrator to obtain the necessary approval to begin work. They commenced searching for a suitable site on which to locate a mission station. For some days they searched extensively within a twenty-mile radius of Rabaul until in Stewart’s words, “we were providentially led to what we believe to be the best location in the Territory as a place for the headquarters of our mission for the whole of the Territory.”14 They were offered a site at the eastern end of the island of Matupit. Stewart continued, “here we were offered a fine house large enough for two families, in a good state of repair, with good outhouses, on a block of ground comprising nearly an acre, freehold property with no encumbrance.”15

G. F. Jones was the first superintendent of the church in the Mandated Territory of New Guinea with headquarters at Matupit. He was joined by July 1929 by Oti Maekera and Robert Salau, teachers from the Solomon Islands.16 Mrs. Jones joined them on July 11. The Matupit Church was formally organized. The first Adventist congregation in the Territory of New Guinea was organized at Matupit in 1933.

In 1937 property at Put Put southeast of Rabaul was purchased. It later became the site of Jones Missionary College (now Kambubu Adventist High School). Rugen Harbour Primary School, and the Rugen Harbour port and slipway.17

Land was secured in the Duke of York Islands in 1953. President Roy Harrison reported that “after many weeks of opposition in the Duke of York Islands, our people have at last won the battle for the ownership of the land, and are now able to go ahead without fear of being driven off.”18 Levi commenced the work there.19

Harrison also reported on the commencement of work in the Baining Mountains, inland from the Put Put Training School. He wrote that “work in the Baining mountains is also developing. We recently placed a teacher in a new village and have added over sixty people to our Sabbath school membership. We were made very happy indeed two weeks ago when we baptized nineteen people in these mountains.”20

Arrival and Early History of the Adventist Church in West New Britain

A young minister was placed on the Talasea Peninsula of West New Britain in 1953. President Roy Harrison wrote that “we have now commenced work in the Talasea district and expect to place another worker further west in the very near future.”21 The same year, Sikoivi, from Bougainville, began working on Vitu Island northwest of the Talasea Peninsula.22

In 1954, the first teachers were sent to the Kombe or Kove area, on the north coast of New Britain west of the Talasea Peninsula. Again, Roy Harrison wrote:

At the beginning of last year we had only one mission station in the whole of the north coast region of this large island. In. February [1954], however, an entry was made on the western side of the peninsula at Talasea...about the middle of May calls started coming in from different islands along the coast. We started sending in teachers and found the demand greater than the supply and today, despite great opposition and the persecution of our teachers who have suffered much for the Lord, we have a membership of nearly five hundred in the Sabbath schools there, twelve workers in the area, a new missionary from the Solomon Islands leaving Rabaul this week, and more urgent calls for additional teachers.23

Roy Harrison maked the first visit by an Adventist to Bali or Unea Island, seventy forty miles south west of Vitu Island in 1955.

In 1977, the district office for West New Britain was formally established in the Kimbe provincial and government center for West New Britain with the construction of a new district director’s house and district office.24

Arrival and Early History of the Adventist Church in New Ireland

On April 18, 1931, the Veilomani arrived at Lomakunauru Village on the southern coast of Mussau Island. Gilbert McLaren was captain of the ship.25 There was a remarkable conversion to Adventism among the people of the Saint Matthias Group of Islands–Mussau, Emirau, and Tench (or Nusi as it was then known).26

In 1933, a leasehold over land at Boliu, Mussau, was procured by the Church. A central school, hospital, and district headquarters were to be built on the land.27 Between 1930 and 1935, the work of the church expanded to Kavieng, the government center for New Ireland, as men from Mussau came to town seeking work.28 A literature evangelist by the name of W. F. Reid worked around the Kavieng township in 1935 and then travelled south down the New Ireland coast to Namatanai. This was the first contact by an Adventist with the people of this central New Ireland town.29 However, formal work did not commence there until early in 1950.30 In 1966, a church was organized at Damon, a little up the coast from Namatanai. This church was the first other than Kavieng to be organized on the island of New Ireland.31

Since the organization of NBNI in 1972 with forty-six churches and 4,393 members, the church has grown to 14,119 members in 109 churches and 184 companies, as of 2018.

1972 46 Churches   4393 members32
1980 53 Churches   6519 members33
1990 68 Churches   10061 members34
2000 98 Churches 64 Companies 14528 members35
2010 109 Churches 184 Companies 17376 members36
2018 109 Churches 184 Companies 14119 members37

Organizational History the New Britain and New Ireland Mission: Structure

Until 1929, there was no formal organizational structure in the mission territories of the Australasian Union Conference in New Guinea, which included the territory of New Britain and New Ireland. In 1929, with the arrival of Griffiths Jones at Matupi on the Island of New Britain, an entity simply known as the “Mandated Territory of New Guinea” appeared in the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. The superintendent was G. F. Jones and the address was “SDA Mission, Matupit, Rabaul.38 This entity, as its name implied, included within its territory the whole of the mandated territory of New Guinea, including New Britain and New Ireland. In 1932, the name of the entity was changed to simply “Territory of New Guinea.”39

In 1945, the Papua-New Guinea Mission was formed.40 This mission included all the territory of the former Territory of New Guinea Mission, and the former Papua Mission. (The Papua Mission had been organized in 1928.)41 The Papua-New Guinea Mission headquarters were located in Port Moresby, Papua. The first superintendent was R. A. R. Thrift.42 In 1946, the name of the Papua-New Guinea Mission was changed to the Papua North East New Guinea Mission.43

In 1947, the Bismarck Archipelago Mission was formed. Charles Mitchell was the first president. The territory of this mission had been previously included in the Papua-New Guinea Mission. In 1947, New Britain, New Ireland, Bougainville, Buka, the Saint Matthias Group, the Admiralty Group, and adjacent islands were taken out of the Papua-New Guinea Mission and organized as the Bismarck Archipelago Mission.44 The remaining territory of the Papua-New Guinea Mission was organized as the Papua North East New Guinea Mission under Robert R. Frame, superintendent.

In 1953, with the formation of the Bismark-Solomons Union Mission, the Bismarck Archipelago was divided into four local missions which were organized as the Bougainville Mission under Cyril Pascoe, the Manus Mission under Karese Manovake,

the New Britain Mission under Eric Boehm, and the New Ireland Mission under John Rongapitu.45 The New Britain Mission was located on a compound at Palm Beach, Rabaul, and the Kavieng Mission was located on a compound in Mussau Street, Kavieng.

In 1955, the New Ireland Mission and the Manus Mission were combined and named the North Bismarck Mission. The headquarters of the mission were initially at Boliu, Mussau. Leslie Webster was the president of the combined Mission.46 In 1956, the headquarters of the mission moved to Kavieng.47

In 1957, the administrative office of the New Britain Mission was moved from Palm Beach to Kamarere Street, Rabaul. It was to remain there until the volcanic eruption of 1994.

Another change in the territory of New Britain and New Ireland occurred in 1961 when the Talasea Mission Station was separated from the New Britain Mission and attached to the Bismarck Solomons Union Mission.48 The territory cared for by the Talasea Station was Southwestern New Britain and the adjacent islands. The headquarters were at Silovuti, in the Kombe area of West New Britain. Cyril Pascoe was the district director. The Silovuti School with four teachers was established at that time.49

In 1964, all of the entities in New Britain and New Ireland were renamed and reorganized. The New Britain Mission was reorganized and renamed as the East New Britain Mission.50 Its territory was designated as “the north eastern portion of New Britain and the southeastern portion of New Ireland.”51 The president was Joseph Mave. It had 624 members meeting in nine organized churches. The headquarters were in Kamarere Street, Rabaul.52 Also in 1964, the Talasea Station, previously attached directly to the Bismarck Solomons Union Mission, was organized as the West New Britain Mission.53 Its territory was designated as “southwestern New Britain and adjacent islands.”54 The president was Cyril Pascoe. It had 235 members meeting in six organized churches. The headquarters remained at Silovuti.55 The other major change that occurred in 1964 was the division of the former North Bismarck Mission into the Manus Mission with headquarters at Lorengau, Manus, and the New Ireland Mission with headquarters in Kavieng.56 The territory of the New Ireland Mission was “northern new Ireland and adjacent islands. The president was Roy Harrison. It had 1,758 members meeting in twenty-eight churches. The headquarters were in Kavieng.57

In 1972, the East New Britain, West New Britain, and New Ireland Missions were combined and organized as the New Britain New Ireland Mission. NBNI was one of ten local Missions in the Papua New Guinea Union Mission.58 The membership of the mission was 4,393, meeting in forty-six organized churches.59 The first president was Rex Cobbin and the first secretary-treasurer was Ivan Tutuo.60

When established, the headquarters of the mission, including the Adventist Book Centre were at Kamarere Street, Rabaul, New Britain, Papua New Guinea.61 District offices remained at Kavieng, New Ireland. The district office for West New Britain was moved to Kimbe, the provincial government headquarters. The NBNI headquarters in Rabaul remained there until the eruption of twin volcanoes Tavurvur and Vulcan on September 18, 1994, destroyed most of the city of Rabaul including the mission office, the Rabaul city church, Malaguna church, the Peninsula Adventist Primary School, and homes of mission employees at Phillip Street, Rabaul. In all, some twenty church-owned buildings suffered varying degrees of damage.62 The mission subsequently secured land on Butuwin Road, Kokopo, where a new administrative headquarters was erected and opened in 2006.63

Organizational History the New Britain and New Ireland Mission: Union Affiliations

Until 1949, all of the local conference and mission entities throughout the territory of the Australasian Union Conference, related directly to the union with headquarters in Sydney. At a specially called session of the Australasian Union in August 16, 1948, a major reorganization was approved. Australia and New Zealand were divided between two union conferences known as the Trans-Tasman Union Conference, and the Trans-Commonwealth Union Conference. The mission territories were also divided into two union missions known as the Coral Sea Union Mission and the Central Pacific Union mission.

New Britain and New Ireland within the Coral Sea Union Mission. In this reorganization, the Bismarck Archipelago Mission which included the territory of New Britain and New Ireland, became one of the local missions of the Coral Sea Union Mission. The territory of the Coral Sea Union Mission was “Papua, the Mandated Territory of New Guinea, and the British Solomon Islands Protectorate.”64

New Britain and New Ireland as Local Missions within the Bismark-Solomons Union Mission. In 1953, the territory of the Coral Sea Union Mission was divided into the Coral Sea Union Mission and the Bismarck-Solomons Union Mission.65 The New Britain Mission and the New Ireland Mission became part of the Bismarck-Solomons Union Mission. The Bismarck-Solomons Union had its headquarters in Rabaul on the island of New Britain. Its territory was “Admiralty Islands, St. Matthias Group, New Hanover, New Ireland and adjacent islands, New Britain and adjacent islands, Bougainville and adjacent islands, and the British Solomon Islands Protectorate; comprising the Bougainville, Eastern Solomon Islands, Malatia, Manus, New Britain, New Ireland, and Western Solomon Islands Missions.”66 As name changes occurred between 1953 and 1972, the territory of New Britain and New Ireland remained in the Bismarck Solomons Union Mission.

Affiliation with the Papua New Guinea Union Mission. In 1972, there was a major reorganization of the Union Missions in the Australasian Division. As a result, the New Britain New Ireland Mission was reorganized as one of ten local missions in a Papua New Guinea Union Mission (PNGUM).67 The local missions were the Bougainville Mission, established in 1929 and reorganized in 1953; the Central Papuan Mission, established in 1908; the Eastern Highlands Mission, organized in 1953; the Madang Manus Mission, organized in 1949 and reorganized in 1953, 1972; the Morobe Mission, organized in 1953; the New Britain New Ireland Mission, organized in 1953 and reorganized in 1961, 1972; the North East Papuan Mission, organized in 1953 and reorganized in 1972; the Papuan Gulf Mission, organized in 1954 and reorganized in 1960; the Sepik Mission, organized in 1953; and the Western Highlands Mission, organized in 1953.68

The missions that had existed up until the reorganization in 1972, but which were absorbed into other missions on reorganization were: Madang Mission, Manus Mission, New Ireland Mission, East New Britain Mission, West New Britain Mission, Milne Bay Mission, and North Papuan Mission.69

In 2000, another major reorganization of the unions in the South Pacific Division occurred at the South Pacific Division session.70 Five unions were reduced two four by rearranging boundaries. However, this change did not alter the territory of the Papua New Guinea Union.

Progress and Challenges in the Mission

The mission statement of the New Britain New Ireland Mission is to make disciples (Matthew 28:18-20), and witness in the context of the three angels’ messages (Revelation 14:6-12) through the empowerment of the Holy Spirit.”71

Fulfilling the Mission of the New Britain New Ireland Mission

The NBNI mission is fulfilling its mission by implementing its strategic plan, equipping and the church membership with skills for witnessing, and discipleship, involvement and providing service to the community, and empowering the church membership with skills to sustain their livelihood.72

The NBNI Mission faces a number of challenges. Geographically, its island communities are separated by water. The islands themselves lack roads and reliable means of transportation. Human resources present a further challenge. There is a need to effectively train the pastoral work force, and to nurture spiritual vitality and disciple-making. Strong cultural traditions and the clash of belief systems compromise membership retention, particularly among younger members and unbaptized youth. Low socio-economic sustainability complicates the mission’s ability to maintain and upgrade an aging infrastructure. Further challenges include illiteracy and the collection, recording, and storage of data and records.73

Superintendents and Presidents of the Missions in the Territory of New Britain and New Ireland Since 1929

Mandated Territory of New Guinea (1929-1932): Griffiths F. Jones (1929-1930); Gilbert Mclaren (1930-1932);

Territory of New Guinea (1932-1945): Gilbert Mclaren (1932-1935); Gerald Peacock (1936-1938); Malcolm E. Abbot (1939-1942); Vacant (1942-1945).

Papua-New Guinea Mission (1945): Roy A. R. Thrift (1945).

North East New Guinea Mission (1946): Robert R. Frame (1946).

Bismarck Archipelago Mission (1947-1953): Charles E. Mitchell (1947-1948); Thomas F. Judd (1948-1953).

New Britain Mission (1953-1964): Eric A Boehm (1953); Roy A. Harrison (1954-1957); Cyril Pascoe (1957-1960); Joseph Mave (1961-1964).

New Ireland Mission (1953-1955): John Rongapitu (1953-1955).

North Bismarck Mission (1955-1964): Leslie A. J. Webster (1955-1960); Wallace Ferguson (1960-1962); K Manovaki (1962-1964).

Talasea Mission Station (1961-1964): Cyril Pascoe (1961-1964).

East New Britain Mission (1964-1972): Joseph Mave (1964-1966); Gapi Ravu (1967-1972).

New Ireland Mission (1964-1972): K. Manovaki (1964-1965); Roy A. Harrison (1965-1970); John Kosmeier (1971-1972).

West New Britain Mission (1964-1972): Cyril Pascoe (1964-1969); Sidney A. Stocken (1969-1970); Elisha Gorapava (1971-1972).

New Britain New Ireland Mission (1972-): Rex E. Cobbin (1973-1974); Robert E. Granger (1976-1977); Frank J. Dyson (1978-1979); Barry D. Oliver (1980-1984); George C. Porter (1985-1990); Wilson Stephen (1991-1995); Samson R. Genun (1996-1998); Nathan Mano (1999); Wilfred Liligeto (2000); Leo Jambby (2001-2005); Blasius Managos (2006-2010); Makoa Daroa (2011-2015); Peter Yambe (2016-2018); Danny Philip (2019-)

Sources

“ADM 10.05, Principles of Denominational Organization.” In South Pacific Division Working Policy. Wahroonga, New South Wales: South Pacific Division, 2018.

Adair, R. H. “Put Put Harbour, Where Is It? What Is It?” Australasian Record, November 2, 1936.

Allum, F. A. “En Route to Honan, China.” Union Conference Record, July 23, 1906.

Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists. Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1972-2019. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR.

Atkins, Nancy. “An Eventful Trip to Rabaul.” Australasian Record, December 6, 1937.

Boehm, Ken A. “Industrial Giant Takes Over Silovuti School.” Australasian Record, May 3, 1982.

“Damage Report from Rabaul.” Record, November 5, 1994.

Dever, J. J. “New Britain District Meeting, May 5-8, 1953.” Australasian Record, June 29, 1953.

Dever, J. J. “The Bismarck Archipelago Enters New Hanover.” Australasian Record, July 17, 1950.

Good News from the Territory of New Guinea.” Adventist Record, November 9, 1931.

Harrison, Lorna. “A Light in New Ireland.” Australasian Record, August 8, 1966.

Harrison, R. N. “Report from New Britain.” Australasian Record, May 11, 1953.

Harrison, Roy N. “Further advances in a New Mission Field.” Australasian Record, October 4, 1954.

Imona, Raymond. “To the Adventist Family Around the World the People of Mussau Say ‘Thank You.’” Australasian Record, July 20, 1981.

Kingston, Kent. “New Office to Rise from under Ash.” Record, December 13, 2003.

Maekera, Oti. “Letter from Oti.” Australasian Record, October 26, 1929.

Manners, Bruce. “Session Votes for Restructure.” Record, November 25, 2000.

“Mission work in Papua New Guinea.” Australasian Record, November 7, 1977.

Mitchell, A. R. “We Are Glad We Came to the Mission Field.” Australasian Record, July 22, 1963.

Oliver, Barry D. “Mussau–Emirau–Tench Jubilee.” Australasian Record, July 20, 1981.

“Only thirty days at home in one year . . .” Australasian Record, January 8, 1962.

“Rabaul Volcanoes.” Record, October 8, 1994.

Reid, W. F. “Canvassing in New Ireland.” Australasian Record, December 16, 1935.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Various years. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks.

“Sonoma Helps Volcanoes’ Victims.” Record, November 12, 1994.

Steed, H. “A School in the Making.” Australasian Record, March 22, 1937.

Stewart, A. G. “A Marvelous Transformation in the St. Matthias Group, Territory of New Guinea.” Australasian Record, July 4, 1932.

Stewart, A. G. “All the Islanders Adventists, Mussau Island, St Matthias Group, Territory of New Guinea.” Australasian Record, September 1, 1932.

Stewart, A. G. “En Route to New Guinea.” Australasian Record, April 17, 1933.

Stewart, A. G. “Opening a New Mission Field in the Territory of New Guinea.” Australasian Record, July 8, 1929.

Stewart, A. G. “The General Meeting in the Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, July 22, 1929,

Notes

  1. Unless otherwise credited, the information in this article comes from the personal knowledge and experience of the author as a former president of the New Britain New Ireland Mission (1980-1984), general secretary of the South Pacific Division (1997-2007), and president of the South Pacific Division (2007-2015). The author acknowledges the assistance of Pastor Lua Bobore, secretary of the New Britain New Ireland Mission, Pauline Yorio, administrative secretary of the Papua New Guinea Union Mission, and Sarah Guguna, departmental assistant in the New Britain New Ireland Mission, in the collection of information for this article.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “New Britain New Ireland Mission,” page 278, accessed January 26, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB2018.pdf.

  3. Ibid.

  4. “ADM 10.05, Principles of Denominational Organization,” in South Pacific Division Working Policy (Wahroonga, New South Wales: South Pacific Division, 2018).

  5. Ibid.

  6. Ibid.

  7. 2019 Annual Statistical Report: 155th Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2017 (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist, 2019), accessed January 21, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2019.pdf.

  8. All data is derived from the “2018 Annual Statistical Report of the South Pacific Division Education Department to the General Conference,” unpublished report held in the files of the Education Director, South Pacific Division of the General Conference, Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia.

  9. Unless otherwise noted, all statistics are from 2018.

  10. Ken A. Boehm, “Industrial Giant Takes Over Silovuti School,” Australasian Record, May 3, 1982, 8.

  11. Elizabeth Dunstan, Education Departmental Assistant, South Pacific Division, email to author, January 28, 2020.

  12. F. A. Allum, “En Route to Honan, China,” Union Conference Record, July 23, 1906, 3.

  13. A. G. Stewart, “Opening a New Mission Field in the Territory of New Guinea,” Australasian Record, July 8, 1929, 3

  14. Ibid,

  15. Ibid.

  16. A. G. Stewart, “The General Meeting in the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, July 22, 1929, 3; Oti Maekera, “Letter from Oti,” Australasian Record, October 26, 1929, 4.

  17. R. H. Adair, “Put Put Harbour, Where Is It? What Is It?” Australasian Record, November 2, 1936, 8; H. Steed, “A School in the Making,” Australasian Record, March 22, 1937, 8; See Kambubu Adventist High School, Papua New Guinea.

  18. R. N. Harrison, “Report from New Britain,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1953, 7.

  19. J. J. Dever, “New Britain District Meeting, May 5-8, 1953,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1953, 6.

  20. R. N. Harrison, “Report from New Britain,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1953, 7.

  21. Ibid.

  22. J. J. Dever, “New Britain District Meeting, May 5-8, 1953,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1953, 6.

  23. Roy N. Harrison, “Further advances in a New Mission Field,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1954, 10.

  24. “Mission work in Papua New Guinea,” Australasian Record, November 7, 1977, 2.

  25. “Good News from the Territory of New Guinea,” Adventist Record, November 9, 1931, 2; A. G. Stewart, “A Marvellous Transformation in the St Matthias group, Territory of New Guinea,” Australasian Record, July 4, 1932, 7; A. G Stewart, “All the Islanders Adventists, Mussau Island, St. Matthias Group, Territory of New Guinea,” Australasian Record, September 1, 1932, 831-832; See Mussau Emirau and Tench, South Pacific Division.

  26. Ibid, Barry D. Oliver, “Mussau–Emirau–Tench Jubilee,” Australasian Record, July 20, 1981, 8-9; Raymond Imona, “To the Adventist Family Around the World the People of Mussau Say ‘Thank You,’” Australasian Record, July 20, 1981, 9.

  27. A. G. Stewart, “En Route to New Guinea,” Australasian Record, April 17, 1933, 8.

  28. Nancy Atkins, “An Eventful Trip to Rabaul,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1937, 3.

  29. W. F. Reid, “Canvassing in New Ireland,” Australasian Record, December 16, 1935, 5.

  30. J. J. Dever, “The Bismarck Archipelago Enters New Hanover,” Australasian Record, July 17, 1950, 5.

  31. Lorna Harrison, “A Light in New Ireland,” Australasian Record, August 8, 1966, 2.

  32. 110th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists 1972 (Washington, DC: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist, 1972), accessed January 26, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1972.pdf.

  33. 118th Annual Statistical Report, 1980” (Washington, DC: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1980), accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1980.pdf.

  34. 128th Annual Statistical Report-1990” (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2019), accessed January 22, 2020, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1990.pdf.

  35. 138th Annual Statistical Report-2000” (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2000), accessed January 22, 2020, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2000.pdf.

  36. 148th Annual Statistical Report-2010” (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2010), accessed January 22, 2020, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2010.pdf.

  37. 2019 Annual Statistical Report: 155th Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2017, (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2019), accessed January 21, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2019.pdf.

  38. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Mandated Territory of New Guinea,” page 129, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1930.pdf

  39. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Territory of New Guinea,” page 73, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1933.pdf

  40. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Australasian Union Conference,” page 77, accessed January 19, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1946.pdf

  41. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Papua Mission,” page 130, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1930.pdf

  42. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Australasian Union Conference,” page 77, accessed January 19, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1946.pdf

  43. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Australasian Union Conference,” page 75, accessed January 19, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1948.pdf

  44. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Australasian Union Conference,” page 75, accessed January 19, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1948.pdf

  45. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bismarck Solomons Union Mission,” page 83, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1954.pdf

  46. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bismarck Solomons Union Mission,” page 68, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1956.pdf

  47. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Bismarck Mission,” page 70, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1957.pdf

  48. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Talasea Station,” page 75, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1962.pdf

  49. Ibid; “Only thirty days at home in one year . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 8, 1962, 8.

  50. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “East New Britain Mission,” page 86, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1965.pdf

  51. Ibid.

  52. Ibid.

  53. A. R. Mitchell, “We Are Glad We Came to the Mission Field,” Australasian Record, July 22, 1963, 6.

  54. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “West New Britain Mission,” page 87, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1965.pdf

  55. Ibid.

  56. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Manus Mission,” page 86, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1965.pdf; Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “New Ireland Mission,” page 87, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1965.pdf

  57. Ibid.

  58. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Papua New Guinea Union Mission,” page 109, accessed January 19, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1973,74.pdf

  59. 110th Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists 1972, (Washington, DC: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1972), accessed January 26, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1972.pdf.

  60. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Australasian Union Conference,” page 75, accessed January 19, 220, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1948.pdf

  61. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bougainville Mission,” page 293, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1995.pdf

  62. “Rabaul Volcanoes,” Record, October 8, 1994, 4; “Damage Report from Rabaul,” Record, November 5, 1994, 1; “Sonoma Helps Volcanoes’ Victims,” Record, November 12, 1994, 10.

  63. Kent Kingston, “New Office to Rise from under Ash,” Record, December 13, 2003, 2.

  64. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Coral Sea Union Mission,” page 78, accessed January 20, 2020 http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1950.pdf

  65. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bismarck Solomons Union Mission,” page 83, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1954.pdf

  66. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bismarck Solomons Union Mission,” page 83, accessed January 20, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1954.pdf

  67. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Papua New Guinea Union Mission,” page 87, accessed January 22, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1965.pdf

  68. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Papua New Guinea Union Mission,” page 109, accessed January 19, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1973,74.pdf

  69. Ibid.

  70. Bruce Manners, “Session Votes for Restructure,” Record, November 25, 2000, 8-9.

  71. Pauline Yorio, Administrative Assistant, PNGUM, email to author, July 16, 2019.

  72. Ibid.

  73. Ibid.

×

Oliver, Barry. "New Britain New Ireland Mission, South Pacific Division." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 15, 2020. Accessed October 21, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=B80Z.

Oliver, Barry. "New Britain New Ireland Mission, South Pacific Division." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 15, 2020. Date of access October 21, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=B80Z.

Oliver, Barry (2020, October 15). New Britain New Ireland Mission, South Pacific Division. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved October 21, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=B80Z.