Jakarta Local Conference

By Yohanes Verdianto Doloksaribu

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Yohanes Verdianto Doloksaribu is a pastor in the Jakarta Local Conference, Indonesia. He has a B.A. in Theology from Surya Nusantara Adventist College, North Sumatera. He finished his M.A. in Religion from Adventist University of Indonesia; and completed his Doctor of Theology with an Emphasis on Church History from the Cipanas Theological Seminary. He has written several articles that have been published in Indonesia and an international journal. He is married to Kristina Simanjuntak. They have two children.

The Jakarta Local Conference (JLC) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Jakarta, Indonesia. It is part of West Indonesia Union Mission (WIUM) in the Southern Asia-Pacific Division (SSD). The Jakarta Local Conference covers the following territories: the provinces of Banten and Jakarta Raya; the municipalities of Bekasi, Bogor, Depok, and Sukabumi; and the regencies of Bekasi, Bogor, Cianjur, Karawang, Purwakarta, and Sukabumi in the province of West Java.1 The conference headquarters is in Manggarai, South Jakarta, Indonesia.2

Statistics as of June 30, 2020: churches - 176, membership - 29,993, population - 44,589,405.3

The Jakarta Local Conference is the largest conference/mission in terms of number of churches, field workers, and income in the entire West Indonesia Union Mission.

Origin of Adventist Work in the Territory of the Jakarta Local Conference

Pastor Edward Harmon Gates, who was the superintendent of a new Mission Department under the auspices of the Australasian Union Conference, wrote a book entitled In Coral Isles. He explains that no one had ever come directly to preach the Gospel in Batavia until 1902.4 On October 21, 1906, Pastor G. F. Jones wrote: “Batavia is a large and important place. Its need, like other places in the Dutch Indies, are good commonsense workers, who will not unwisely run against the Dutchman’s authority.”5 After that, he convinced the Australian Conference to send missionaries to the Java island, Dutch Indies (now Indonesia).

God’s work in Java Island began when the Australian Conference meeting in 1906 decided to send missionaries to Java. Sister Petra Tunheim, who had just come to Australia, was present at the meeting. She felt very moved to open up God’s work in Java.

On November 1, 1906, the Australian Conference sent several missionaries to Surabaya, Java Island, Indonesia. Some of them included George Teasdale and Sister Petra Tunheim.6 Teasdale came with his family and his sister Helena Teasdale.7 At that time, the Dutch East Indies government had granted permission to work in three cities, namely: Batavia, Surabaya, and Semarang.8

The beginning of God's work at the Jakarta Conference began in 1910 when Pastor R. W. Munson started a printing press that printed reading materials containing the truth in Sukabumi. At that time, he was assisted by Brother Samuel Rantung and Imanuel Siregar. Unfortunately, the government forbade the printing of the truth in Sukabumi, and eventually the Adventist service center was moved to Jakarta. In Jakarta, a plot of land that is slightly elevated had been purchased and two houses were built for mission workers in 1911. The houses are located in Gondangdia Lama, which is now known as Sawo Street, Menteng.9 In Sukabumi, Pastor Munson baptized five people on March 29, 1911. The five souls that were baptized included Mrs. Tan Beng Kwan, Tan Kwie Nio, Tan Tek Liem, Mrs. Heuman, and Samuel Rantung.10

The first baptism in Jakarta was held on Tuesday morning, December 5, 1911. At that time, nine people were baptized, including Liam Tiang Eng and his wife, Tan Ek You and wife, P. Pieterz and his wife, Pieterz’s mother-in-law Tan Tjeng Soey, and Emma Brouwer.11 God’s work in Jakarta was growing day by day, and more and more precious souls were accepting Jesus. Brethren Pieterz and Samuel Rantung worked together in spreading the Gospel. Pieterz was a teacher of the Gospel, and he went out and gave Bible talks while Rantung sold tracts and small books that contained the truth.12

God’s work in Batavia grew when the Malaysia Union Mission was organized in 1912, and it included the Dutch East Indies area (now Indonesia).13Seeing the increasing number of church members, the chairman of the Malaysian union at that time, Pastor G. F. Jones, together with the chairman of the Australian Conference, Pastor F. E. Fulton, organized Java’s first church in the city of Batavia (now Jakarta) with 27 members on June 25, 1913. On the following Sabbath, there was an ordination service for local elders.14 The first organized church was Weltevreden (now Kramat Pulo).15

At almost the same time, brethren I. H. Evans and Detamore sailed from Hong Kong on December 11, 1912, and reached Singapore on Sunday, December 15, 1912, about noon. After visiting some land that had been devoted to a school site, they returned to Singapore on Tuesday evening. The next afternoon, they left Singapore for Batavia (now Jakarta) on a small boat.16 Their work in Batavia was prospering. Fourteen people had recently been baptized at Batavia, and others had begun keeping the Sabbath.17

Petra Tunheim, who had just arrived from Surabaya to assist and finally replace Pastor R. W. Munson's ministry in Jakarta18 at the beginning of 1912,19 saw that Jakarta was said to be the most wicked city in Java. The immorality was terrible; one would scarcely think it so bad until one had lived here. She found that almost half of the men and women lived together without being married. She then encouraged as many of these unmarried couples to get married, showing them from the Bible that God requires a higher standard of morality. With the help of Elder Detamore, the evangelism work grew faster in Jakarta and also the surrounding area.20 Finally, in 1913 West Java was organized as a local mission with headquarters at Salemba, Jakarta. Petra Tunheim was appointed superintendent of the new local mission field, where she served from 191321 until 1915.22 When she worked in Batavia, she followed her customary method of evangelism by distributing literature, and once again had some success. Every Saturday she would hold a Sabbath School in the morning for the Dutch and another in the afternoon for the Malays, Javanese, and Chinese.23

The work of evangelism in Jakarta grew rapidly under the superintendence of Sister Petra Tunheim24 and her successor, Pastor I. C. Schmidt. Pastor Schmidt and his wife arrived at Batavia on September 15, 1915, to carry on the work of Petra Tunheim.25 His work in Batavia was conducted from 1915-1922, where then he served in Singapore. From 1915 to 1922, Schmidt served in Batavia as the director of West Java Mission.26 In December 1923, the first West Java Conference was held in Jakarta with a delegation of five churches representing 250 church members. The five churches were: Weltevreden (now Kramat Pulo), Meester Cornelis (now Jatinegara), Gondangdia Lama (now Menteng), Sukabumi and Bandung.27

This conference aimed to develop a strategy for implementing the church’s mission to the world, especially in West Java, including Batavia, which was the capital of the Dutch East Indies at that time.28 The results of this conference made God’s work expand more rapidly in Batavia, and the leadership of God’s work shifted from missionaries from abroad to native Indonesians. This transition occurred in 1945 when Pastor M. Kountul was appointed as the president of West Java Mission.29 From then until now, God’s work has progressed and has penetrated into three provinces, namely Banten, Jakarta Special Region, and parts of West Java.

The Organizational History of the Conference

In 1913, The West Java Mission was organized as a local mission with its headquarters in Salemba, Jakarta. The territories were composed of the following provinces: Banten, Jakarta Special Region, and parts of West Java.30 After 60 years, the West Indonesia Union Mission, which included West Java Mission, made a significant change in the organization of the SDA Church in Java. The WIUM pondered the division of the region at the WIUM conference at the end of November 1972, where the division of territory was effective in early 1973. To welcome the recommendations of the Union conference, the West Java regional conference was held on January 9-13, 1973.31

For the purpose of improving service and work efficiency, the West Java Region was divided into two: West Java, which was based in Bogor, and Central Java, which was based in Bandung. At that time, the elected chairman of West Java was Pastor C. G. Manurung. The West Java Region included the Jakarta province and its surroundings up to latitude 1071/2, from Cianjur to Serang, Banten.32 The West Java headquarters was at 39 Siliwangi Street, Bogor, Java, Indonesia.33

The following people became the presidents of West Java Mission before it was divided into two regions in 1973:34 Petra Tunheim (1913-1914); I. C. Schmidt (1915-1923); J. S. Yates (1924-1926); H. Eelsing (1927-1930); P. Drinhaus (1931-1935); H. Zimmermann (1936-1941); K. Tilstra (1942-1945); M. Kountul (1945-1947); D. S. Kime (1948-1950); E. H. Vijsma (1951); Theo D. Manullang (1952-1960); A. L. Lesiasel (1961-1963); S. F. Sitompul (1964-1966); H. E. Mangkei (1967-1968); A. L. Lesiasel (1969-1972).

After West Java was divided into two regions in 1973, namely West Java and Central Java, under the leadership of Pastor C. G. Manurung, God's work in Jakarta continued growing. The churches rose and united. Souls were brought to Christ through baptism, and the number of members increased year by year. In that year, a church school was opened by the Jatinegara Church on March 1, 1973.35

On January 26-28, 1976, the West Java conference meeting was held at the Adventist Building, Jakarta. The theme was “Keep Forward With God.” In line with the conference, it was hoped that church members would be more active in involving themselves in evangelism. It was proven that evangelism was progressing, and God’s work was growing in Jakarta.36 Due to the work efficiency and service of the congregations, the West Java Mission office was moved from Bogor to 47 Salemba Raya Street, Central Jakarta, in 1977. Then the office moved to 129 Tebet Barat Dalam Street, South Jakarta, on February 1, 1986.37

With evangelism increasingly active, the number of congregations in the West Java conference report in early 1989 noted that there were 53 congregations and a membership of 8,874.38 In 1981, a regional and service adjustment was held in West Java Mission, which determined the West Java Mission in the Jakarta Mission was covering the areas of Jakarta, Bogor, Sukabumi, Cianjur, Purwakarta, and Banten. After the Jakarta Mission was formed, a church member’s house located at 129 Tebet Barat Dalam Raya Street, South Jakarta, was purchased, and it became the Jakarta Mission office on February 1, 1986.39

The following people became the presidents of West Java Mission before it became Jakarta Mission:40 C. G. Manurung (1973-1977); A. Rantung (1978-1980).

After the Jakarta Mission was formed in 1981, the elected president was Pastor A. Hendriks, who was later replaced by Pastor Kaleb Onsoe in 1987. Pastor Onsoe served as president of the Jakarta Mission until 1990. In 1991, the Jakarta Mission leadership was replaced by Pastor Marudin Siagian. Under the leadership of Pastor Siagian, the Jakarta Mission became the Jakarta Conference. After receiving recommendations on the evaluation results made by the Union and the Division, the upgrade of the status of the Jakarta Mission to the Jakarta Local Conference (JLC) was set on November 17, 1993. Then Pastor Marudin was re-elected to be the president of the Jakarta Conference until 1999. When Pastor Siagian became president of the JLC, in 1998 the organization bought an office building on 48 Dr. Saharjo Street, South Jakarta, to replace the old office building.41

The following people served as the presidents of Jakarta Mission before it became Jakarta Local Conference (JLC):42 Alex Hendriks (1981-1987); Kaleb Onsoe (1988-1990); Marudin Siagian (1991-1993).

God's work at JLC continued progressing day by day, and finally the whole territory of JLC was divided into 18 areas for a faster response to the needs of the membership and efficient, systematic, and effective management and supervision. Within these 18 regions, 178 churches in JLC were joined. During the 108 years (1913-2021) of God's work in Jakarta, 178 churches have been established along with 32 Sabbath School branches and new fields;43 and the church membership is 22,857.44

God’s work through health services is also growing at JLC. On January 24, 2002, when Pastor R. S. Situmeang became president of JLC, JLC opened a clinic called the Jakarta Adventist Clinic. This clinic is located in the old JLC office at Tebet Barat Dalam Raya Street, South Jakarta. Dr. Tagor O. Tambunan, Dr. Johnly L. Tambunan were the first doctors to serve at the Jakarta Adventist Clinic, and Dr. Yansen Siburian served as a dentist at the clinic.45 Besides the health services through the clinic, JLC also has Chinese Ministry Center or CMC, which was established on June 9, 2003, in Jakarta. CMC is a self-supporting ministry in the organization of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and run by lay members with a vision: Bringing the Three Angel's messages to the Chinese community. Along the way, in addition to the Chinese community outreach, most of whom live in urban areas, CMC also ministers to Chinese in major cities in Indonesia. The ministry started in Jakarta, but is now also available in Surabaya, Semarang, Solo, Bandung, Bali, Medan, Jambi, Pontianak, Makassar and Manado. Their missions include: (1) Bible Studies; (2) Health Ministry, through health seminars, a lifestyle center, an organic farm, and a healthy bakery; (3) Media Ministry, via YouTube, Instagram, etc.; (4) CMC Centers of Influence are now present in 18 locations in Indonesia.46

In the field of education, JLC is very active in opening educational institutions to prepare workers who will serve in the Adventist Church. The first Adventist school at JLC was the Sukabumi Adventist School in 1937.47 During World War II, this school was closed and later reopened in 1954; then the name of the school since 1974 has been the Perguruan Advent Sukabumi (PASMI).48 The Kramat Pulo Adventist School was inaugurated in 192049 before Indonesia’s independence in 1945, and in 1949, Thelma M. Manullang began teaching at this school, and then became the director of the school.50 Menteng Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1965.51 Salemba Adventist Academy was inaugurated in May 31, 1967.52

Taman Sari Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1969. However, because of the development of requirements of education that could not be met such as the unavailability of yard facilities and other educational activities facilities as well as the consideration that there were several other Adventist schools, such as in Kramat Pulo, Salemba, Menteng, and Bendungan Hilir, the decision was taken to transfer all the students to Kramat Pulo Adventist Academy. Finally starting in June 1990, the activities of the Tamansari Adventist Elementary School ended.53 54 Bendungan Hilir Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1965.55 Jatinegara Adventist Academy was established in 1973. Rawamangun Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1973.56 Tanjung Priok Adventist Academy began in 1982. Bogor Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1982. Bekasi Adventist Academy was established in 1982. Remidi Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1978 (now Tanjung Barat Adventist Academy). Anggrek Adventist Academy was created in 1984. Ciracas Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1989. Dharma Putra Adventist Academy was established in 1994. Serang Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1998. Makarios Adventist Academy was established in 1998. Legenda Adventist Academy was inaugurated in 1999. Taruna Adventist Academy was established in 2010.57

In addition to services in education and health, JLC also has a program called Shelter House. It is a kind of shelter for people who have problems, are hopeless or hurt, and also for people who are marginalized. There they are prayed for, trained, and taught psychologically and spiritually. Currently, JLC has two shelter houses located in Cipayung, East Jakarta, and Tanah Abang, Central Jakarta.58

Future Outlook

JLC is growing in all aspects of its ministry. To expand the work of God in JLC, several projects have been established. First, Church Planting Program (CPP). CPP is a program to contact the unreached area in JLC.59 In 2021, CPP reached at least five regencies that had not been reached before: Jampang, Pelabuhan Ratu, Muara Gembong, Kepulauan Seribu, and Baduy. In the following years, it is hoped that new regencies can be reached. JLC also has program to reach our Moslem cousins. At least, JLC has two projects to reach them: Adventist Moslem Relationship (AMR) and Moslem Background Believers (MBB).

AMR is a program intended to establish friendships with Moslems. One of the activities carried out by JLC through AMR is training for the community in the field of education and community empowerment. So far, JLC has 30 AMR teachers with Moslem backgrounds. MBB is a program to accommodate associations or communities of church members with Moslem backgrounds. As we know, Indonesia is the biggest Moslem country in the world. Currently, JLC only has one MBB, and it is planned that in the next five years, there will be 10 new MBBs formed.60

JLC also focuses on empowering members through “Total Member Involvement.” It aims to activate church members to evangelize through care groups and personal evangelism. A guidebook for care groups has been published to help church members when they are evangelized through care groups.61 Along with the progress of God's work at JLC, there is great hope that in the future JLC can become two Conferences / Missions.62

Presidents

Marudin Siagian (1994-1999); R. S. Situmeang (2000-2002); Lendra Situmorang (2003-2005); Mastur Sitompul (2006-2008); Lendra Situmorang (2009-2011); W. L. Limbong (2012-Maret 2014); Rindu Hutapea (April 2014-2015); A. H. Marbun (2016-2020); Hormat Hasibuan (2021- ).63

Sources

Diredja, M. E. “The Early Advent Movement.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1956.

Direja, M. E. “Kenang-kenangan Permulaan Pekerjaan Advent di Jawa.” Warta Gereja Advent, June 1974.

Gates, E. H. In Coral Isles. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1923.

Jones, G. F. “Java and Sumatra.” Union Conference Record, October 21, 1906.

Munson, R. W. “A Review of Our Work in West Java.” Australasian Record, February 26, 1912.

Nainggolan, Rajoaman. “Indonesia Union College: A Historical Study of a Seventh-day Adventist Institution,” Ed.D. Dissertation, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, 1984.

Porter, R. C. “The Malasian Field.” Asiatic Division Mission News 3, April 1, 1914.

Report from Pastor Johanis R. Wenas, executive secretary of JLC, September 13, 2021.

Report from Omer Simbolon, education director of JLC, September 14, 2021.

Sarumpaet, R. I. “Stoppress.” Warta Gereja Advent. January 1973.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Tambunan, E. H. Eben-Haezer: Seabad Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di DKI Jakarta & Sekitarnya (Jakarta: GMAHK DKI Jakarta & Sekigtarnya, 2012).

Tambunan, E. H. Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia: Perintisan dan Perkembangannya (Bandung: Indonesia Publishing House, 1999).

“The East Indies,” News Letter for the Asiatic Division,1, letter IX (Feb. 1, 1913): 1. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19130201-V01-09.pdf.

Tunheim, Petra. “Experiences in Batavia, Java,” The Youth’s Instructor, October 14, 1913.

Tunheim, P[etra]. “Java, East Indies.” ARH, April 4, 1912.

Tunheim, Petra. “The Sadness of Parting.” Australasian Record, February 19, 1912.

Notes

  1. “Jakarta Conference,” SDA Yearbook (2021), https://www.adventistyearbook.org/entity?EntityID=13132&highlight=jakarta|conference.

  2. “Hubungi Kami,” https://www.adventistjakarta.org/hubungi-kami.

  3. “Jakarta Conference,” SDA Yearbook 2020. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/entity?EntityID=13132&highlight=jakarta|conference.

  4. E. H. Gates, In Coral Isles (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1923), 237.

  5. G. F. Jones, “Java and Sumatra,” Union Conference Record 10, no. 21 (October 21, 1906): 4. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl%3A336527/%3Fview_only%3Dtrue.

  6. M. E. Direja, “Kenang-kenangan Permulaan Pekerjaan Advent di Jawa,” Warta Gereja Advent, June 1974, 23.

  7. D. Graham Stacey, “Teasdale, George (1868-1967),” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=2865&highlight=east|java.

  8. “The East Indies,” News Letter for the Asiatic Division 1, letter IX (Feb. 1, 1913): 1. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19130201-V01-09.pdf.

  9. Direja, “Kenang-kenangan Permulaan Pekerjaan Advent di Jawa,” 24.

  10. D. Batoebara, “Tambahan Pengerdja-pengerdja,” Warta Geredja, June 1961, 92.

  11. R. W. Munson, “A Review of Our Work in West Java,” Australasian Record 16, no. 9 (February 26, 1912): 4. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/AAR/AAR19120226-V16-09.pdf.

  12. Petra Tunheim, “The Sadness of Parting,” Australasian Record, February 19, 1912, 4.

  13. E. H. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer: Seabad Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di DKI Jakarta & Sekitarnya (Jakarta: GMAHK DKI Jakarta & Sekigtarnya, 2012), 91.

  14. “The East Indies,” News Letter for the Asiatic Division 1, letter V (Oct. 1, 1918): 1. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19121001-V01-05.pdf.

  15. Direja, “Kenang-kenangan Permulaan Pekerjaan Advent di Jawa,” 25.

  16. “The East Indies,” News Letter for the Asiatic Division 1, letter IX (Feb. 1, 1913): 1. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19130201-V01-09.pdf.

  17. “The East Indies,” News Letter of the Asiatic Division 3, letter IV (July 1, 1913): 2. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19130701-V02-04.pdf.

  18. M. E. Diredja, “The Early Advent Movement,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1956, 8.

  19. Milton Hook, “Skadsheim, Petra (Tunheim) (1871-1923),” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAWT&highlight=tunheim.

  20. Petra Tunheim, “Experiences in Batavia, Java,” The Youth’s Instructor, October 14, 1913, 6-7.

  21. “West Java Mission,” SDA Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1914), 130.

  22. M. E. Direja, “Kenang-kenangan Permulaan Pekabaran Advent di Indonesia,” Warta Gereja Advent (November 1973): 13. See also Rajoaman Nainggolan, “Indonesia Union College: A Historical Study of a Seventh-day Adventist Institution,” Ed.D. Dissertation, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, 1984, 36.

  23. P[etra] Tunheim, “Java, East Indies,” ARH. April 4, 1912, 13-14.

  24. R. C. Porter, “The Malaysian Field,” Asiatic Division Mission News 3, no. 1 (April 1, 1914): 1.

  25. Kweqlys F. C. Satori, and Ingrid I. M. Tornalejo, “Schmidt, Isaac Chester (1887-1978),” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HASI&highlight=schmidt.

  26. Satori and Tornalejo, “Schmidt, Isaac Chester (1887-1978).” See also Diredja, “The Early Advent Movement,” 8.

  27. Direja, “Kenang-kenangan Permulaan Pekerjaan Advent di Jawa,” 25.

  28. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 101.

  29. SDA Yearbook 1952. 107.

  30. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/entity?EntityID=13132&highlight=jakarta|conference.

  31. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 153.

  32. R. I. Sarumpaet, “Stoppress,” Warta Gereja Advent (January 1973): 7.

  33. Don. F. Neufeld, (ed.), “Indonesia,” in Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, rev. ed. (Washington, DC: 1976), 640.

  34. All data are retrieved from the SDA Yearbook 1913-1972.

  35. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 157, 159.

  36. Ibid., 166.

  37. E. H. Tambunan, Gereja Masehi Advent Hari Ketujuh di Indonesia: Perintisan dan Perkembangannya (Bandung: Indonesia Publishing House, 1999), 300.

  38. J. Sitorus, “Rapat Tahunan DKI Jakarta,” Warta Gereja Advent (April 1989): 3.

  39. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 196.

  40. All data are retrieved from the SDA Yearbook 1973-1980.

  41. Interview with Pastor Marudin Siagian, on September 13, 2021, at JLC office, South Jakarta.

  42. All data are retrieved from the SDA Yearbook 1981-1993.

  43. Interview with Pastor Ketler Sagala, SS & PM Director of JLC, on September 12, 2021, by phone.

  44. Report from Pastor Johanis R. Wenas, executive secretary of JLC, September 13, 2021.

  45. Notary Deed of Establishment of Jakarta Adventist Clinic Foundation, No. 3, January 24, 2002.

  46. Interview with Eddy Nurhan, Director of CMC, on September 15, 2021, by phone and WhatsApp.

  47. E. H. Tambunan, Seabad Pendidikan Advent di Indonesia (Bandung: Indonesia Publishing House): 60-61.

  48. Letter from the Head of the Regional Office of the Ministry of Education and Culture of West Java Province, November 22, 1982, No. 1342/I.02.4/R.1982.

  49. Report from Omer Simbolon, education director of JLC, September 14, 2021.

  50. Interview with Thelma M. Manullang on September 12, 2021, by phone and WhatsApp (through her son).

  51. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 226.

  52. Report from Omer Simbolon, education director of JLC, September 14, 2021.

  53. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 227.

  54. Interview with James Djumadi, one of the students who graduated from Taman Sari Adventist Academy in 1977 (now he was an elder of Taman Sari church), on September 12, 2021, by phone and WhatsApp.

  55. Report from Omer Simbolon, education director of JLC, September 14, 2021.

  56. Tambunan, Eben-Haezer, 227.

  57. Report from Omer Simbolon, education director of JLC, September 14, 2021.

  58. Interview with Pastor Melvin Malau, AM, AMR and Church Planting Director of JLC, on September 15 and 17, 2021, at JLC Office, South Jakarta.

  59. Interview with Pastor Hormat Hasibuan, JLC president, on September 14, 2021, at JLC office, South Jakarta.

  60. Interview with Pastor Melvin Malau, September 15 and 17, 2021.

  61. Yohanes Verdianto Doloksaribu, et al. Modul Kelompok Peduli (Jakarta: Departemen Sekolah Sabat dan Pelayanan Perorangan Konferens DKI Jakarta dan Sekitarnya, 2007).

  62. Interview with Pastor Hormat Hasibuan, September 14, 2021.

  63. All data are retrieved from the SDA Yearbook 1994-2020 and interviews with some of the presidents (i.e. Marudin Siagian, Lendra Situmorang, W. L. Limbong, Rindu Hutapea, A. H. Marbun, and Hormat Hasibuan).

×

Doloksaribu, Yohanes Verdianto. "Jakarta Local Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 27, 2021. Accessed January 27, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAQC.

Doloksaribu, Yohanes Verdianto. "Jakarta Local Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 27, 2021. Date of access January 27, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAQC.

Doloksaribu, Yohanes Verdianto (2021, October 27). Jakarta Local Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved January 27, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAQC.