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Julia and Joseph Steed

Photo courtesy of Michael Steed.

Steed, Joseph Everson (1859–1938) and Julia Mary (Stephens) (1860–1947)

By Michael Vernon Steed

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Michael Vernon Steed, M.Hlth. Sc. (PHC), (University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia), retired in 2018 as Nurse/Counsellor from Hunter New England Addictions and Mental Health, New South Wales, Australia. As a South Australian by birth, Mr Steed has been employed in government and private health sectors around Australia. He also served the church as a nurse, Adventist College teacher and administrator at the Sydney Adventist Hospital, Avondale College Faculty of Nursing and Health, and Mamarapha Adventist Aboriginal College.

Joseph Steed was a pioneer evangelist in South Australia and Samoa. Steed and his wife, Julia, effectively utilized newspapers and literature in sharing the teachings of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Early Years in Norwood

Joseph Everson Steed was born in Norwood, Adelaide, in 1859.1 He was the son of Frederick Richard Steed (1828–1901) and Maria Everson (1833–1882), both emigrants to South Australia. Joseph Steed married Julia Mary Stephens (1860–1947) in 1880.2 Their children were Joseph Thomas Frederick Steed (1881–1950), Edward Horace Stephens Steed (1883–1932), Arthur Norman Steed (1886–1887), Ethel Julia May Steed (1888–1955), Alma Chlorine Steed (1890–1974), Dora Amelia Steed (1893–1984), and Harry Roy Steed (1897–1941).3 His business with his father, called “Steed & Son: House Decorators & Painters,” was located on the Parade, Norwood.4

First Evangelistic Series in South Australia

In 1886 pioneer John Corliss held an evangelistic series in a tent in Stepney, SA.5 Joseph had been persuaded to attend the tent meetings and was impressed by Corliss and his message. Because of the tensions caused by family work commitments, Joseph was not baptized until 1888.6 Then in August 1888, after being baptized by George C. Tenney, Joseph was a delegate to the first Australian Seventh-day Adventist conference session in Melbourne.7 Julia had been baptized by M. C. Israel in 1887.

Early Literature Evangelist and Church Elder

As one of the first literature evangelists in Australia, Joseph canvassed the mining town of Broken Hill in 1889–1890, with notable converts A. W. Semmens and R. H. Constandt later making useful contributions.8 Ordained an elder in Adelaide in 1891/1892 by William Curtis, Joseph carried the responsibilities of an elder without a resident minister for a period of time. He discontinued full-time canvassing. A. G. Daniells came from Melbourne to train church officers in biblical and pastoral care. Joseph considered Daniells his mentor during those years.9 The Steeds moved to Scott’s Creek in the Adelaide Hills, SA, in 1893 for a short time, then Joseph canvassed in the Kadina district in 1894, with positive results.10 He then conducted meetings in Echunga and a successful evangelistic series in Tea Tree Gulley in 1897/1898, resulting in a number of baptisms.11

In 1898 Joseph was appointed as the South Australian state agent for the new Sanitarium Health Food products produced in Melbourne. His wife, Julia (1860-1947)12, had her own fruit and vegetable shop on the Parade, Norwood, where these products were sold in Adelaide for the very first time. 13 In the same year the Adelaide church embarked upon setting up in West Terrace, Adelaide, a Helping Hand Rescue Home for Destitute Women.14 Joseph as secretary on the committee overseeing the running of this institution was appointed to conduct spiritual meetings twice a week for the residents.

Resuming canvassing in 1899, Steed traveled extensively by train and bicycle. With those who showed interest in the teachings of the Church he would keep in touch by letter or visitation.15 In 1900 he plied the Murray River and Lake Alexandrina in a boat with a foot paddle. He named the boat the Herald.16 In 1901 and 1902, Steed canvassed the northern towns of Laura and Willowie, among others. He drew large crowds to his “Lantern Lectures” on Christ. Then in 1903/1904 Steed assisted and trained other canvassers, especially promoting The Desire of Ages in the city of Broken Hill, NSW.

From 1905 to 1907 Joseph Steed worked with T. H. Craddock, G. Hubbard, and R. Hare in a number of evangelistic series conducted in provincial towns in South Australia, including Petersburg, Jamestown, Burra, Naracoorte, Hamley Bridge, and Balaklava.17 Even though there was much prejudice, and heating in the venues left much to be desired, a number of people were baptized as a result.

Appointed to the German Samoa Mission

In 1907 the Australasian Union Conference Council reopened the Samoan field, with Joseph Steed as its first appointed evangelist. The Steed family that included children Dora and Harry first set out for Buresala, Fiji, to become acquainted with methods used in island work.18

Calvin H. Parker, superintendent of the Fijian mission field, was appointed to accompany the Steeds, and all arrived in Apia, Samoa, in late December 1907.19 Parker and Steed held meetings among the few European Adventists living in Apia, Samoa. Parker organized the first Seventh-day Adventist church in Samoa in 1908 with a membership of five with Joseph Steed in charge of this small company.20 Simple health treatments and hydrotherapy kept Julia and Dora busy at the Sanitarium Hospital.21

In August 1908 the Steeds attended the Fijian Council meeting with other island delegates to hear John Fulton, from the Australasian Union Conference, announce the forming of a Central Polynesian Mission.22 Head administrator would be Calvin Parker, with Joseph Steed and William Palmer as his assistants.23 The headquarters would be at Buresala, Ovalau, Fiji, with Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga making up this new administrative body.24

The Steeds remained located in Samoa. However, Steed struggled with Polynesian culture and customs.25 In 1909 Sybil Read, a Bible worker, who had previous experience in Samoa, arrived to assist him.26 Around this time Malama Vaiola Kerisome, a part Samoan and Niuean islander, was accepted into the Steed family and became known as Vai Steed.27 She proved to be a valuable worker in Samoa and later at Avondale College, assisting in the translation of Samoan and Niue literature for the islands. She would later go back as a teacher missionary to her people in Niue.28

A disturbing change in events occurred when a Savaii island chief, Lauaki Mamoe, and his warriors decided to challenge the German administration. This led to German warships being dispatched to Samoa and the potential uprising was averted.29 On board the Leipzig was a petty officer, Gustav Backhaus, who with other sailors attended Steed’s meetings at the sanitarium. Backhaus and four other sailors responded positively to the subjects presented. He desired to go back to Germany and finish his time in the navy and then join Steed in Samoa. Steed advised him to attend the Adventist school in Germany and then return to Samoa.30

Backhaus was baptized in Germany and decided to go to South Australia. He had developed a romantic acquaintance with Steed’s daughter, Dora, while in Samoa, and the two were married in Adelaide.31 Gustav Backhaus joined Daniel Wall in the Barossa Valley mission that resulted in forming a new German-speaking church at Nuriootpa.32

Toward the end of 1909 Steed became sick with bronchial asthma and was ordered by the doctor to leave Samoa. In November he spent a few days at the Sydney Sanitarium before going on to engage in mission work in South Australia.33 His wife, children, and Via Kerisome, who was to attend the Avondale School for Christian Workers, followed later in December 1909.34

Evangelism in South Australia and Victoria

On arrival in South Australia Steed engaged in pastoral work and evangelism. He worked with A. H. Rogers conducting a tent effort at Beverley during the first few months of 1910. Following, another tent was erected at Kilkenny, and a series of meetings conducted.35 During this time he continued to be involved in translation for the work in Samoa.36 In January 1911 the Steed family were transferred to Victoria. He conducted successful evangelistic series in Brunswick, the mining town of Costerfield, and St. Kilda.37 At the Victorian-Tasmanian Conference camp in St. Kilda in 1912, Joseph Steed was ordained to the ministry.38 In 1913 the Steeds relocated to the Murray-Goulburn Valley. He pitched tents and conducted evangelistic series in Nathalia, Kerang, and Swan Hill in 1914. 39 In each place Steed found that the newspapers provided honest and detailed accounts of his topics.40 Town clergy challenged Steed, but his tactful reasoning impressed many people, and eight people were baptized.

Return to Samoa

The Steeds returned to Samoa in 1914.41 A church was built and dedicated at Lalovaea by John Cole in November 1915, and the first baptisms were conducted in the Visigano River.42 A further baptism by Steed occurred with a high chief two months later. His name was changed from Mana, meaning “power,” to Faimalo, meaning “making a kingdom,” after his conversion.43 In 1916 the Central Polynesia Mission, comprising Fiji, Samoa, and Niue, became the Central Polynesian Conference. Joseph Steed was appointed as vice president, and a new school building with a new teacher were approved.44

By 1918 church membership in Samoa was thirty, with twenty of the members being Samoans.45 During that year Steed baptized Mrs. Margaretta Reye and her sons.46 Husband Ernst Reye, who had been influenced by German higher criticism and modernism, found Steed’s discussion of archaeology persuasive, and was eventually won over by the missionaries’ consistent lives.47

Ministry in Fiji

With missionary work expanding rapidly in Fiji, and a need for more workers, by early June 1920 the Steeds were transferred to work among the European population in Suva.48 In Fiji Steed found a place to conduct evangelistic meetings in a cinema. He encountered a group calling themselves “rationalists,” who claimed that the Bible was not inspired, and directed questions to Steed of an evolutionary and geological nature. Their letters appeared in the local paper, giving Steed an opportunity to discuss many points of belief.49

Steed also engaged in circulating literature, visiting people and doing ship mission work among the trading vessels visiting Suva Harbor.50 He also found time to assist with the building of the new mission school at Navuso with Gordon Branster.51

Meanwhile, back in Samoa, some replacement missionaries, including William Litster, a teacher at Vailoa, returned to Australia in early 1921, because of poor health.52 With many challenges for the work in Samoa, the Steeds returned in mid-1921, noticing changes with some new faces, others missing altogether.53

There was much work to occupy Steed. He found he could not deal with everything alone, so he made an appeal for a suitable tradesman who could fill that role in the work of the church in Samoa. The response was disappointing.54 Steed had his hands full with Bible studies, but, together with church members, conducted a successful Appeal for Missions campaign. He met with, and had the respect of significant leading Samoan officials such as heads of government, the chief judge, the commissioner of police, and the American and Chinese consuls.55

On October 15 Steed was thrilled after much effort with the baptism of five individuals and with others showing interest.56 However, after years of service the Steeds with mixed emotions left Samoa, arriving in Australia on December 10, 1921, with Thomas and Edith Howse taking up the work in Samoa once again.57

Ministry Back in Australia

In 1922 the Steeds located in Tumut, NSW, again pitching a tent and conducting an evangelistic series. The meetings attracted detailed coverage in the local newspapers. Prejudice by local clergy kept many people from attending, but meetings in two small villages at Lacmalac and Brungle had good attendances.58

In 1923, appointed to the North New Zealand Conference, Steed was the pastor of Ponsonby church. There he engaged in pastoral and evangelistic work around Auckland. Steed’s personal approach was appreciated by many, particularly young people. He was able to converse with a large cross section of the community and records indicate that he conducted a number of weddings and funerals.59 In 1925 Steed visited and encouraged members in Wellington and Petone. He attended the camp meeting at Dannevirke in 1926, where he participated in a number of baptisms.

In 1926 the Steeds were transferred to Adelaide for pastoral and evangelistic work. He conducted an evangelistic series the city of Adelaide. Using his prophetic charts, he delivered lectures in the Advent Hall. Ruby Stratford, a Bible worker and preacher, brought a number of people to the lectures. Then in 1928 the Steeds spent a few months in Broken Hill again conducting a series of meetings for the public.60

The Steeds were next appointed to the New South Wales town of Maitland. Steed ministered to prisoners in the East Maitland jail, and raised money for the hospital. A camp meeting was conducted on the Singleton showgrounds in 1929, with Steed as a speaker. Thirteen people were baptized. During this time with the industrial unrest because of the lockout and the depression, Steed visited the mining families of Pelaw Main and Kurri Kurri. A number of people attended his public meetings. Three were baptized, and others had Bible studies.61

A conference camp meeting was held at Pelaw Main in October 1930. Many miners and their families attended regularly.62 Robert Hare attributed the attendance to Joseph Steed’s tireless work in the district. At the end of the camp and session Steed was asked to continue his much-appreciated pastoral labor in Kurri Kurri. Nineteen newly baptized people had been welcomed into Church fellowship as members.63

The Final Years

By September 1931 the Steeds had retired and were residing in Dee Why, NSW. 64 Still active, in early 1932 Joseph organized a Sabbath School which met in a Hall at Balgowlah.65 But by 1933 the Sabbath School had reorganized and was meeting in the United Friendly Societies Hall, Manly.

Joseph Everson Steed died in 1938,66 and Julia Mary Steed died on June 12, 1947, at The Entrance, NSW.67 A. G. Stewart wrote about Julia: “In her passing one of the early links with the pioneer days of the advent message in Australia has been broken.”68 Both Joseph and Julia Steed are buried at Avondale Adventist Cemetery, Cooranbong.69

Legacy

The Steeds were pioneers in the Australasian Union Conference in evangelism, personal pastoral ministry. They effectively utilized newspapers and literature in sharing the teachings of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Joseph wrote many articles for Church and secular papers. Popular themes included Christ as man, sin offering, and mediator. Three generations of Steeds followed him in ministry for the Church: Harry Steed, Ernest Steed, Robert Steed,70 and Lincoln Steed.71

Sources

“A Lantern Lecture.” The Laura Standard, December 6, 1901.

Adelaide Church minutes, 1886–1890. South Australian Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church Archives, Adelaide, SA.

Adelaide Church minutes, 1892–1904, South Australian Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church Archives, Adelaide, SA.

“After spending a few days at the Sydney Sanitarium . . .” Union Conference Record, November 22, 1909)

“After spending a number of years in Samoa . . .” Union Conference Record, June 13, 1910.

“An Appreciative Letter.” Australasian Record, February 20, 1911.

Ancestry.com.Australia, Birth Index, 1788–1922 [database online], Provo, Utah, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Joseph Everson Steed, vol. 15, p. 248.

Ancestry.com.Australia, Death Index, 1788–1922 [database online]. Provo, Utah, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Joseph Everson Steed, no. 3386.

Ancestry.com.England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837–1915. Provo, Utah, USA: Julia [Maria] Mary Stephens, Oct 28, 1860. FHL film number 1130493. Ref. ID: 101/8. Pp. 259, 260.

Ancestry.com.NSW Registry of Births, Deaths, & Marriages. Death Registration no. 12585/1947. WYONG. Julia Mary Steed. Father: Thomas Frederick Stephens.

“Baptismal Service.” Singleton Argus, January 6, 1930.

Brandstater, R. “North New South Wales—Kurri Kurri Mission Baptism.” Australasian Record, June 8, 1931.

“Brush Hands Wanted.” The South Australian Advertiser, March 25, 1886.

Bullas, A. “Swan Hill.” Australasian Record, July 20, 1914.

Burgess, A. C. A. C. Burgess to Elder Pierson, December 6, 1973. South Pacific Division Heritage Centre. Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Biographical Folder 2149.

Burke, R. E. “Melbourne.” Australasian Record, May 22, 1911.

Butz, Edwin S. “South Australia.” Union Conference Record, June 11, 1906.

Caramel Cereal Granola and Nut Butter, advertisement. The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 17, 1898.

Carswell, W. R. “South New South Wales—God’s Spirit Working in Manly.” Australasian Record, July 17, 1933.

Constandt, R. H. “Personal Acquaintance Brings Implicit Trust.” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935.

Coombe, L. C., and R. H. Abbott. “Dora Amelia Backhouse obituary.” Australasian Record, September 29, 1984.

Craddock, T. H. “Petersburg, South Australia.” Union Conference Record, August 1, 1905.

Craddock, T. H., and J. E. Steed. “South Australia.” Union Conference Record, March 5, 1905.

Daniells, A. G. “Adelaide.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1, 1892.

Foster, P. G. “North New South Wales—News Notes.” Australasian Record, June 9, 1930.

———. “North New Zealand Conference.” Australasian Record, March 1, 1926.

Gage, K., and B. Rand. “What Human Nature Did Jesus Take? Unfallen. Fallen.” Ministry, June 1985.

Gillespie, J. “Victorian–Tasmanian Camp Meeting.” Australasian Record, March 18, 1912.

Hay, David. “Joys and Sorrows.” In Samoa 100+ Years: The South Pacific and Beyond. Ed. David Hay. Newcastle, NSW: W H O Presentations Services, 2005.

Hare, Reuben E. “North New South Wales Camp Meeting.” Australasian Record, November 17, 1930.

———.. “South New South Wales—Dee Why,” Australasian Record, March 21, 1932.

“Helping Hand Mission,” The [Adelaide] Advertiser, December 28, 1898.

Howse, E. B. “Samoa.” Union Conference Record, October 24, 1910.

Howse, T. “On Furlough from Samoa.” Australasian Record, February 28, 1916.

Hubbard, G. “South Australia.” Union Conference Record, March 4, 1907.

———.. “South Australia.” Union Conference Record, July 1, 1907.

“In addition to his evangelistic work . . .” Australasian Record, October 18, 1920.

Israel, M. C. “Ballarat and Adelaide.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 1887.

Johanson, J. “Canvassing in the Central Conference.” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1899)

Kent, J. K. “Middle Park, Melbourne.” Australasian Record, January 29, 1912.

Kent, T. R. “Tumut, N.S.W.” Australasian Record, March 19, 1923.

“Maitland Hospital—Secretary’s Report.” Maitland Weekly Mercury, January 19, 1929.

“News Letters—Willowie February 11.” Petersburg Times and Northern Advertiser, February 21, 1902.

“North American Division.” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Accessed June 26, 2019. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/entity?EntityID=14197&highlight=Lincoln|Steed.

Olsen, O. A. “Report of the Australian Union Conference.” ARH, July 1, 1909.

“On his recent visit to Samoa . . .” Australasian Record, April 4, 1921.

“Our Canvassers—South Australia.” Union Conference Record, November 1, 1900.

“Our Canvassers—South Australia.” Union Conference Record, May 1, 1901.

“Our readers will be rejoiced to know . . .” Australasian Record, July 7, 1914.

“Our readers will remember . . .” Australasian Record, November 13, 1911.

Parker, C. H. “Central Polynesian Conference.” Australasian Record, November 27, 1916.

———. “Central Polynesian Conference.” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918.

———. “Our Mission Field: Samoa.” Union Conference Record, February 17, 1908.

———. “Progress in the Central Polynesian Conference.” Australasian Record, May 16, 1921.

———. “Samoa.” ARH, April 16, 1908.

———. “The Fijian Council.” Union Conference Record, July 20, 1908.

Parker, C. H., and A. G. Stewart. “The Fijian Council.” Union Conference Record, August 3, 1908.

Parker, C. H., and J. E. Steed. “Our Mission Field, Samoa: Arrival at Samoa.” Union Conference Record, February 17, 1908.

“Pastor J. E. Steed and wife . . .” Australasian Record, December 26, 1921.

“Pastor Robert Hare and Brother Steed . . .” Union Conference Record, December 17, 1906.

“Pastor Steed and wife left Samoa early in June for Fiji . . .” Australasian Record, July 12, 1920.

“Pastor Steed, writing from Samoa . . .” Australasian Record, June 13, 1921.

Reye, R. “Ernst Reye.” Australasian Record, September 25, 1933.

Rogers, A. H. “Adelaide.” Union Conference Record, June 6, 1910.

———. “South Australia.” Union Conference Record, April 11, 1910.

Sibley, D. “Bowes, Clara Louisa.” Australasian Record, August 31, 1942.

“Sister Steed and family . . .” Union Conference Record, January 10, 1910.

Steed, Ernest H. J. “Pioneer Steed Carried Advent Message to New Areas.” Australasian Record, June 13, 1955.

“Steed, Frederick Richard.” Accessed April 25, 2018. https://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/10421/20041200/www.firstfamilies2001.net.au/search.html

Steed, Joseph. “Appeal for Missions in Western Samoa.” Australasian Record, September 15, 1921.

———. “Our Mission Field—Samoa.” Union Conference Record, May 24, 1909.

Steed, Joseph E. “Bread Cast upon the Waters.” Australasian Record, August 8, 1911.

———. “Kerang, Victoria.” Australasian Record, June 4, 1914.

———. “Pastor J. E. Steed Writes from Bennett Street, Dee Why, N.S.W.” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935.

———. “Samoa.” ARH, October 21, 1909.

———. “Samoa.” ARH, February 24, 1916.

———. “Samoa.” Australasian Record, November 8, 1915.

———. “The Influenza in Samoa.” Australasian Record, May 26, 1919.

———. “The Work in Samoa.” Australasian Record, June 13, 1921.

———. “The Work in Samoa.” Australasian Record, February 20, 1922.

———. “Work for Europeans in Fiji.” Australasian Record, December 27, 1920.

Steed, Joseph E., and Julia M. Steed. “Back to Samoa.” Australasian Record, January 18, 1915.

———. “Pastoral Work in Auckland.” Australasian Record, September 1, 1924.

Stewart, A. G. “Julia Mary Steed obituary.” Australasian Record, July 14, 1947.

Stratford, S. V. “Their Daily Living Corresponded with Their Faith.” Australasian Record, July 11, 1955.

Tenney, G. C. “Australian Conference Proceedings.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 1888.

“The Fijian mail . . .” Union Conference Record, December 30, 1907.

Todd, J. “South Australia, News Notes—Adelaide.” Australasian Record, June 25, 1928.

Turner, W. G. “A Record Camp.” Australasian Record, November 17, 1930.

Were, Eric W. “The Forerunners.” In Of Pioneers and Progress: Seventh-Day Adventists in South Australia, 1886—1986. Edited South Australian Conference Committee. Adelaide, SA: Gillingham Printers Pty., Ltd., 1986.

White, A. H. “Joseph E. Steed obituary.” Australasian Record, March 14, 1938.

Woods, J. H. “Melbourne, Victoria.” Australasian Record, March 25, 1912.

Notes

  1. Ancestry.com.Australia, Birth Index, 1788-1922 [database online] (Provo, Utah, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010), Joseph Everson Steed vol. 15, p. 248; Ancestry.com.Australia, Death Index, 1788–1922 [database online] (Provo, Utah, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010), Joseph Everson Steed, no. 3386.

  2. Ancestry.com.England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837–1915 (Provo, Utah, USA: Julia [Maria] Mary Stephens, October 28, 1860), FHL film number 1130493, Ref. ID 101/8, pp. 259, 260; Ancestry.com, NSW Registry of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, Death, Registration no. 12585/1947 (WYONG, Julia Mary Steed; Father, Thomas Frederick Stephens).

  3. Ibid.

  4. “Brush Hands Wanted,” The South Australian Advertiser, March 25, 1886, 1.

  5. M. C. Israel, “Ballarat and Adelaide,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 1887, 128.

  6. Adelaide Church minutes 1886 —1890, South Australian Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church Archives, Adelaide, SA.

  7. G. C. Tenney, “Australian Conference Proceedings,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 1888, 156.

  8. R. H. Constandt, “Personal Acquaintance Brings Implicit Trust,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935, 21.

  9. Joseph E. Steed, “Pastor J. E. Steed Writes from Bennett Street, Dee Why, N.S.W,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935, 21.

  10. A. C. Burgess, A. C. Burgess to Elder Pierson, December 6, 1973, South Pacific Division Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia (Biographical Folder 2149).

  11. S. V. Stratford, “Their Daily Living Corresponded with Their Faith,” Australasian Record, July 11, 1955, 2.

  12. A. G. Stewart, “Steed, Julia Mary,” obituary citation, Australasian Record, July 14, 1947, 7.

  13. Caramel Cereal Granola and Nut Butter advertisement, The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 17, 1898, 335.

  14. “Helping Hand Mission,” The [Adelaide] Advertiser, December 28, 1898, 7.

  15. Ernest H. J. Steed, “Pioneer Steed Carried Advent Message to New Areas,” Australasian Record, June 13, 1955, 2; J. Johanson, “Canvassing in the Central Conference,” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1899, 11.

  16. “Our Canvassers—South Australia,” Union Conference Record, November 1, 1900, 8.

  17. T. H. Craddock, “Petersburg, South Australia,” Union Conference Record, August 1, 1905, 3, 4.

  18. “The Fijian mail . . . ,” Union Conference Record, December 30, 1907, 7.

  19. C. H. Parker and J. E. Steed, “Our Mission Field, Samoa: Arrival at Samoa,” Union Conference Record, February 17, 1908, 3, 4.

  20. C. H. Parker, “Samoa,” ARH, April 16, 1908, 14.

  21. Steed, “Pioneer Steed Carried Advent Message to New Areas.”

  22. C. H. Parker, “The Fijian Council,” Union Conference Record, July 20, 1908, 3, 4.

  23. C. H. Parker and A. G. Stewart, “The Fijian Council,” Union Conference Record, August 3, 1908, 2, 3.

  24. O. A. Olsen, “Report of the Australian Union Conference,” ARH, July 1, 1909, 9, 10.

  25. Joseph Steed, “Our Mission Field—Samoa,” Union Conference Record, May 24, 1909, 2, 3.

  26. “After spending a number of years in Samoa . . . ,” Union Conference Record, June 13, 1910, 8.

  27. “An Appreciative Letter,” Australasian Record, February 20, 1911, 3.

  28. “Our readers will be rejoiced to know . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 7, 1914, 8.

  29. Joseph E. Steed, “Samoa,” ARH, October 21, 1909, 12.

  30. Joseph E. Steed, “Bread Cast Upon the Waters,” Australasian Record, August 8, 1911, 3.

  31. “Our readers will remember . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 13, 1911, 8.

  32. L. C. Coombe and R. H. Abbott, “Dora Amelia Backhouse obituary,” Australasian Record, September 29, 1984, 14.

  33. “After spending a few days at the Sydney Sanitarium . . . ,” Union Conference Record, November 22, 1909, 8.

  34. “Sister Steed and family . . . ,” Union Conference Record, January 10, 1910, 8.

  35. A. H. Rogers, “Adelaide,” Union Conference Record, June 6, 1910, 2, 3.

  36. E. B. Howse, “Samoa,” Union Conference Record, October 24, 1910, 23, 24.

  37. J. H. Woods, “Melbourne, Victoria,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1912, 5.

  38. J. Gillespie, “Victorian—Tasmanian Camp Meeting,” Australasian Record, March 18, 1912, 4, 5.

  39. A. H. Rogers, “South Australia,” Union Conference Record, April 11, 1910,  5.

  40. Joseph E. Steed, “Kerang, Victoria,” Australasian Record, June 4, 1914, 5.

  41. Joseph E. Steed and Julia M. Steed, “Back to Samoa,” Australasian Record, January 18, 1915, 3.

  42. Joseph E. Steed, “Samoa,” Australasian Record, November 8, 1915, 3.

  43. Joseph E. Steed, “Samoa,” ARH, February 24, 1916, 10, 11.

  44. C. H. Parker, “Central Polynesian Conference,” Australasian Record, November 27, 1916, 3.

  45. C. H. Parker, “Central Polynesian Conference,” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918, 49–51.

  46. David Hay, “Joys and Sorrows,” in Samoa 100+ Years: The South Pacific and Beyond, ed. David Hay (Newcastle, NSW: W H O Presentation Services, 2005), 136.

  47. Joseph E. Steed, “The Influenza in Samoa,” Australasian Record23, no. 12 (May 26, 1919): 3.

  48. “Pastor Steed and wife left Samoa early in June for Fiji . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 12, 1920, 8.

  49. Joseph E. Steed, “Work for Europeans in Fiji,” Australasian Record, December 27, 1920, 3.

  50. “In addition to his evangelistic work . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 18, 1920, 6.

  51. C. H. Parker, “Progress in the Central Polynesian Conference,” Australasian Record, May 16, 1921, 3, 4.

  52. “On his recent visit to Samoa . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 4, 1921, 7.

  53. Joseph E. Steed, “The Work in Samoa,” Australasian Record, June 13, 1921, 3.

  54. “Pastor Steed, writing from Samoa . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 13, 1921, 8.

  55. Joseph Steed, “Appeal for Missions in Western Samoa,” Australasian Record, September 15, 1921, 4, 5.

  56. Joseph E. Steed, “The Work in Samoa,” Australasian Record, February 20, 1922, 3.

  57. “Pastor J. E. Steed and wife . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 26, 1921,  8.

  58. T. R. Kent, “Tumut, N.S.W.,” Australasian Record, March 19, 1923, 6, 8.

  59. Joseph E. Steed and Julia M. Steed, “Pastoral Work in Auckland,” Australasian Record, September 1, 1924, 6.

  60. J. Todd, “South Australia, News Notes—Adelaide,” Australasian Record, June 25, 1928, 6.

  61. P. G. Foster, “North New South Wales—News Notes,” Australasian Record, June 9, 1930, 4.

  62. W. G. Turner, “A Record Camp,” Australasian Record, November 17, 1930, 5.

  63. R. Brandstater, “North New South Wales—Kurri Kurri Mission Baptism,” Australasian Record, June 8, 1931, 4.

  64. Reuben E. Hare, “South New South Wales—Dee Why,” Australasian Record, March 21, 1932, 4.

  65. Hay, ed., 189, 190.

  66. A. H. White, “Joseph E. Steed obituary,” Australasian Record, March 14, 1938, 7.

  67. Stewart, 7.

  68. Ibid.

  69. Ibid.

  70. Eric W. Were, “The Forerunners,” in Of Pioneers and Progress: Seventh-Day Adventists in South Australia, 1886–1986, ed. South Australian Conference Committee (Adelaide, SA: Gillingham Printers Pty., Ltd., 1986), 34.

  71. “North American Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, accessed June 26, 2019, https://www.adventistyearbook.org/entity?EntityID=14197&highlight=Lincoln|Steed.

×

Steed, Michael Vernon. "Steed, Joseph Everson (1859–1938) and Julia Mary (Stephens) (1860–1947)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 15, 2020. Accessed October 21, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=C85M.

Steed, Michael Vernon. "Steed, Joseph Everson (1859–1938) and Julia Mary (Stephens) (1860–1947)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 15, 2020. Date of access October 21, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=C85M.

Steed, Michael Vernon (2020, October 15). Steed, Joseph Everson (1859–1938) and Julia Mary (Stephens) (1860–1947). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved October 21, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=C85M.