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Fulton College graduation class, 1960. Faculty advisor, Noel Mills, seated in the front row.

Photo courtesy of Adventist Heritage Centre, Australia.

Fulton Adventist University College

By Stephen J. Currow

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Stephen Currow, D.Min. (Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California, the United States), is the vice president (academic) at Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, NSW, Australia. Trained as a pastor, he has worked in various ministry positions including pastor, lecturer, and administrator in Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua New Guinea and the United Kingdom. His research interests and publications have been in the areas of congregational life, youth ministry and Adventist mission history. He is married to Narisa and has two adult daughters.

Fulton Adventist University College is located at Sabeto, near the town of Nadi on the west coast of the island of Viti Levu, Fiji. It is administered by the Trans Pacific Union Mission. It currently offers courses of study to degree level in business, education and theology.

The Beginnings of Seventh-day Adventist Education in Fiji

The first Seventh-day Adventists to Fiji arrived on August 3, 1891, on the maiden voyage of the Pitcairn.1 John I. Tay and his wife remained in Fiji. However, he contracted influenza and passed away six months later and was buried in Suva Cemetery.2 Adventist Mission restarted in Fiji in July 1895 when John and Fanny Cole came from Norfolk Island.3 The following year John and Susie Fulton arrived from New Zealand.4 After two years the Coles were replaced by Calvin and Myrtle Parker.5

John Fulton believed that the education of indigenous workers was an important part of mission and the greatest contribution expatriates could make to the mission of the church.6 The initial plan for educating Fijian workers was to have them attend Avondale College in Australia, but this proved too difficult, because of the challenges Fijians faced leaving Fiji and the level of English competency required by Australia for student visas.7 Consequently the first Fijian Church Council in November 1903 decided to develop the Fiji Training Institute. It was an ambitious development for a newly established organization comprising just 150 members in four churches.8

Fulton College has its roots in this training institute,9 commissioned in 1903 by John Fulton, the superintendent of the Fiji Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Through the years there have been a number of changes of name, which reflect various aspects of development. As the land at Suvavou, where the church was established, was considered unsuitable for a training institute,10 the leaders earnestly sought God’s leading in the selection of the land for the location of the school.11 The search led them to a 276-acre property at Buresala on the island of Ovalau. The rich soil of the property was well watered and timbered. It was located 11 miles overland or 16 miles by water from Levuka, the first capital of Fiji.12 The plan also included transferring the church headquarters from Suvavou to Buresala.13 Consequently, in 1905, Fulton’s house from Suvavou was dismantled and shipped to the new site, where it was reassembled and converted into a duplex, one for Fulton, the superintendent of the mission, and one for Carr, the principal of the new Fiji Training Institute.14 In addition, eight native houses were provided, with one for the printing press, one for supplies, and six for students.15 The Fiji Training Institute (1905–1917) opened later in 1905 as an industrial school with ten students.16 The following year, work began on a larger, more permanent school building.17

When the church restructured its organization and established the Central Polynesian Field, the institute changed its name to the Central Polynesian Training Institute (1918–1921).18

With the growth of the church in the Wainibuka Valley,19 there were too many people, many of whom were too young, to go to Buresala. Consequently, a school at Navuso was established in 1922.20 The teacher-training component of the Fiji Training Institute was relocated from Buresala to Navuso.21 As a result, the Central Polynesian Training Institute changed its name to Buresala Training School (1922–1939)22 to distinguish it from Navuso.

With the shortage of trained Adventist teachers, George Masters, in 1928, began a “class for teachers and also one for Bible workers” at the Samabula Indian School on the outskirts of Suva.23 Another teacher training program was commenced at Vatuvonu in 1939.24

In 1937, when the government began to regulate education in Fiji, churches, including the SDA Church, now had to conform to the crown.25 In response to these developments of rising academic standards, the growth of the church on the main island, the difficulty of staffing three training institutions, and the need for infrastructure upgrades, the church decided to consolidate these training institutions into a new institution that would be built on land within thirty miles of Suva, the capital.26

Fulton College and Relocation to Korovou, Tailevu

Buresala ceased to operate at the end of 1939, and the following year a group of students and staff, known as the Gang of 40, under the direction of Arthur Dyason, developed the new property.27 Buresala relocated from Ovalau to Tailevu and merged with Navuso School, and the teaching components of both the Samabula Indian School and Vatuvonu School. The budget for this relocation was £2000 plus the sale of a launch and the land from the existing institutions.28 It is noted that this project took place under the financial constraints of a world at war.

The new institution, which was named after John Fulton, would provide accommodation for 200 students. The courses offered would include pastoral training, teacher training, and technical instruction. There would also be Indian and Fijian primary schools.29 The church intended that this new institution would be the Avondale of the Pacific, enabling Pacific Island students to be trained in the Pacific Islands.30 The official opening of Fulton Missionary School (1941–1948),31 as reported by the new principal, A. G. Stewart, was held on April 28, 1941.32

As the church continued to grow throughout the region, the Central Pacific Union, a new regional administrative structure, was created.33 At this time the church transferred Fulton Missionary School from the control of the Fiji Mission, changed its name to Fulton Missionary College (1949–1970), and commissioned it as the senior educational entity of the new union, providing for the denominational training needs of the region.34 To mark this change of status to a college, Fulton reorganized itself into departments and also held its first graduation in 1949.35

A rebuilding program commenced with a kitchen and dining room (1959).36 To mark the twenty-first anniversary, the plans for the new administration building, library, chapel, and classroom block were unveiled.37 This was completed in 1964 and opened by the governor of Fiji.38

In the 1960s, under the direction of Max Ferguson, Fulton developed a dairy industry. The total lease hold expanded from the initial four hundred acres to almost one thousand six hundred acres. At one time Fulton was the largest shareholder in Rewa Dairy. It was hoped that this industry would enable the college to become self-supporting. However, recruiting the ongoing expertise to manage such an investment and ensuring that the focus of the institution remained on education saw these farms sold one by one.39

In 1971, just after the independence of Fiji, Fulton Missionary College was renamed as Fulton College (1971–2017).40 A new primary/junior secondary school also was built by the first ever Fly ’n’ Build team to come to the Central Pacific Union Mission.41

Beginning in the late 1980s Fulton benefited from many volunteer trips to renovate the infrastructure. John Morris, a layman from Sydney, oversaw these projects for more than a decade,42 including the repairs after the direct hit from Cyclone Kina in 1992.43

In the 1990s, under the leadership of Nemani Tausere—the first Fijian principal and the longest serving principal in one appointment,44 a number of other building projects commenced. These included an expansion of staff and student housing, the building of transit units, and the expansion of the library.

In early 2000 Fulton, the Education Department of the Trans Pacific Union,45 and the Fiji Mission developed a memorandum of understanding with the Fiji Ministry of Education. This MoU included opportunities for Fulton’s education students to be sponsored by Public Service Commission scholarships, as well as the possibility of paying salaries for lecturers. The signing of this MoU was derailed because of the military coup of 2006.46 However, some Fulton Education students received Public Service Commission scholarships.

Fiji Higher Education Commission

In October 2008 the Fiji Higher Education Promulgation47 was gazetted, establishing the Fiji Higher Education Commission [FHEC]. Its mission was “to ensure that higher education institutions pursue an indispensable level of quality, excellence, and relevance in higher education that is globally competitive and internationally recognized.”48 The FHEC was also to work in conjunction with the Fiji Qualifications Council to provide a national qualifications framework to ensure international recognition for accredited Fijian qualifications. In the light of the Higher Education Regulations, gazetted in November 2009, the FHEC established a two-stage process to accredit institutions: recognition and registration. The accreditation of programs could only occur after the institution had been registered. FHEC recognized Fulton College in December 2010 and registered Fulton as a university college in November 2012 for a five-year period.49

Relocation to Sabeto (2014– )

In the late 1990s the landowners from Nakalawaca village started to express dissatisfaction with the lease arrangements. They felt that the college was prospering and that they were not receiving adequate compensation for their land. Three specific complaints were lodged with the Native Land Trust Board (NLTB), and a notice of breach of lease was issued in May 2001.50 As the thirty-year lease was soon to expire, this breach of lease was resolved by commencing negotiations to renew the lease.51The lease renewal followed the appropriate process. However, once the seventy-five-year lease had been agreed between the NLTB and the church, and the landowners’ share of the premium deposited in their account, they issued an injunction against registering the title and commencing almost a decade of legal challenges.52 Early in 2008, while awaiting an appeal hearing, the landowners, in contempt of court, issued the church an eviction notice.53 At this point the church decided to relocate to a new site.54

In 2010 a 99-year lease on a 123-acre site at Sabeto, close to Nadi Airport, was signed.55 Construction commenced in 2011, and the new institution opened for classes in 2014.56 In 2018, after the FHEC renewed Fulton’s institutional registration, Fulton was renamed Fulton Adventist University College (2018– ).57

Academic Programs and Recognition

Adventist education in Fiji commenced with a combination of programs for both adults and children. In the urban areas some of these adult programs, such as those commenced by Mrs. Meyers for the Indians in Samabula, were conducted in the evening.58 As time progressed, two distinct streams of education emerged—training programs and schools.59 At times in its history in Fiji, Adventist education has been leading educational trends. At other times it has been a follower of these trends.60

Although the overall emphasis of the academic programs at Fulton College and its composite institutions was on training programs, school facilities were also incorporated into the consolidated institution at Korovou, Tailevu, in 1941.61 This school served a significant function in the development of educational standards, especially the evolving entry levels for the training programs. Thus over time, the training programs evolved from the generic training of an industrial school through postsecondary specialisms to an internationally recognized higher education qualification. This section will highlight some of the academic developments, beginning with the school system and concluding with an overview of higher education.

Schools

Mrs. Meyers, with her evangelistic work among the Indians in Samabula, was the first Adventists to offer school-type education.62 In 1922 this school, under the leadership of George Masters, was the first school in Fiji to offer the Preliminary Cambridge Examination to non-Europeans.63 As the church grew in the Wainibuka Valley, a school was established at Naqia in 192064 and a boarding school at Navuso in 1922.65 With this school the teacher training program from Buresala was transferred to Navuso, providing a useful synergy between the teacher training in the classroom and the experience in the school.66 In 1933 Vatuvonu School opened at Buca Bay in Vanua Levu.67

By the late 1930s the government began to focus on education in schools. Until this point in time, the vast majority of education had been initiated and supported by church organizations. The ensuing regulations required churches, including the Adventist Church, to focus was on the qualifications of teachers.68

As educational levels continued to rise, Fulton offered opportunities for students to sit for international exams, such as the Cambridge Junior, or the national exams, such as the Fiji Junior Certificate. In 1958 Fulton introduced the Cambridge Overseas Senior School Certificate.69 In 1968 Fulton was registered as a secondary school to offer form 3 to form 4.70 Consequently, in 1969 Fulton introduced form 6 and the New Zealand University Entrance (NZUE) Examination.71

Following government trends, Fulton reorganized its school structures in 1976 and introduced a junior secondary level.72 Structurally, the senior secondary component remained a part of the college. As educational opportunities increased across the Pacific, the need for a boarding junior secondary school diminished, resulting in Fulton closing this component in 1989.73 This resolved some of the challenges of having boarding students from such a wide age disparity in the same residence halls.

In 1992 Fulton introduced form 7. Over the next decade, form 7 became the entry level for the degree programs. Again, as local options for secondary education throughout the Pacific increased, the demand for the boarding senior high school at Fulton decreased, resulting in its closure at the end of 2002.74

After this time Fulton focused on higher education. However, the primary school (classes 1-8) and the Early Childhood Education Centre continued to operate on the Fulton campus until the relocation to Sabeto at the end of 2013, with half the students coming from within the Fulton community.75

Higher Education

In the beginning Buresala, like most other industrial schools, offered training in religious education and a range of practical life skills. However, Buresala was unique adding the important component of health to its curriculum.76 A book for the training of ministers was printed in the Fijian language. This book provides an indication of the initial curriculum, which included Bible prophecy, studies of the books of the Bible, arithmetic, geography, and physiology.77 In 1914 the curriculum was expanded with the addition of drawing and singing. The cocurricular industrial work was considered to be very practical, with “entire work periods . . . devoted to gardening, fencing, carpentry, boat building, repairing, etc.”78 In 1917 the curriculum was reported to include such regular school subjects as reading, writing, arithmetic, English, geography, physiology, the life of Christ, and biblical prophecies.79

With the consolidation of the institutions, teacher training students were sitting the government teaching examinations.80

In 1948 separate ministerial, teacher training, and building courses were introduced.81 In 1952 the entry level for the training courses was raised from form 3 to form 4.82 The first business studies students graduated in 1954.83 In 1959 the entry level to training programs rose to form 5.84 The business programs diversified adding accounting and secretarial studies. By the end of the 1950s students had opportunities to sit for exams with the Royal Society of Arts, Pitman House, the Incorporated Phonographic Society of Australia,85 and later the Commercial Education Society of Australia.86

In terms of other practical programs, a Building Construction Certificate was offered between 1952–1963 and 1983–1988.87 In the 1970s Fulton experimented with programs in agriculture, industrial arts, home economics and mechanics. However, these programs lasted at most a couple of years, as they were not considered viable.88

Government Recognition

Following on from the commencement of the government regulating school education, in the 1960s the government’s focus turned to higher education. The University of the South Pacific, a regional university owned by a number of Pacific island countries, commenced operations in Suva in 1968. The following year, Fulton was registered as a secondary teacher training institution and also as a commercial school. In 1970 form 6 became the entry level to the diploma programs.89

The church in the South Pacific explored a number of options to respond to these developments in higher education. Initially the plan was to upgrade Fulton, and in 1979 three-year diplomas in education, both primary and secondary, and theology were introduced. 90 Subsequently, Pacific Adventist College, with the authority of an Act of Parliament of Papua New Guinea to offer certificates, diplomas, and degrees, opened in Papua New Guinea in 1984.91 Fulton’s diploma programs, including staff and students, were transferred to Pacific Adventist College, leaving Fulton to offer only certificate-level programs in business, primary education, and theology.92 This significant change created a crisis of identity for Fulton.

Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools and Colleges [AAA]

In preparation for the first accreditation visit from AAA in 1987, Fulton engaged in a self-study review. This process contributed to strategies in which Fulton responded to the higher education context, including seeking outside accreditation to complement the internal denominational processes.93 Fulton’s initial term of AAA accreditation was until the end of 199094 and marked the start of rebuilding Fulton’s new identity.

South Pacific Association of Theological Schools [SPATS]

The first outside accreditation came in 1989 from SPATS, based in Suva. Fulton’s Theology Department sought membership and accreditation from SPATS. The SPATS visit to Fulton confirmed that the three-year theology program offered by Fulton met their requirements for the Diploma of Theology, and SPATS accredited this program for a period of five years.95 With this regional recognition, graduates from the Fulton diploma would be eligible to enter the prestigious Bachelor of Divinity offered by the Pacific Theological College in Suva.96

Pacific Adventist University

The SPATS accreditation added to Fulton’s self-identity. As a result, Fulton was able to negotiate similar recognition for its theology program from Pacific Adventist College and the South Pacific Division Tertiary Education Board in November 1989. With this recognition, Fulton graduates were able to enter directly into the degree component of Pacific Adventist College’s Bachelor of Arts (Theology) program. This agreement also became the catalyst for starting a major revision of the denomination’s theological curriculum across the Pacific. The new curriculum designed a common core, which would be taught in a similar sequence, and contain only a limited range of institutionally focused electives to allow for contextual differences. The revised diploma curriculum was formally adopted in March 1991 and the degree curriculum in March 1992.97 Later, in 2005, Fulton commenced offering the Bachelor of Arts in Theology, awarded by Pacific Adventist University.98

In 1991 a proposal to recognize Fulton’s newly revised three-year Diploma of Primary Education was approved by the South Pacific Division Tertiary Education Board. This new program also attracted three years of credit toward Pacific Adventist College’s Bachelor of Education (Primary) degree. Enrollment in this program attracted significant numbers of students from within Fiji. In 1999 the church designated this program to be the primary education degree-teaching program for the South Pacific Islands and awarded as a Pacific Adventist University degree.99

In May 2005 the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific established a Commission on Tertiary Education in the Pacific. This commission was in response to a number of trends in Adventist higher education throughout the Pacific.100 Although the commission recommended an integrated system under the umbrella of Pacific Adventist University, the final arrangement reflected an affiliation of institutions that focused on three key principles: the transferability of credits between institutions; quality assurance for the institutions; and developing synergies in resourcing.101

In September 2008 the Fulton College board voted to approve the signing of the Institutional Affiliation Agreement between Pacific Adventist University and Fulton College, commencing January 1, 2009.102 In addition to the institutional affiliation, separate memorandums of understanding were developed for each program—education, theology, and business.103 Although the institutional affiliation was for a five-year period, the program MoUs were for an initial three-year period.

In 2014 these arrangements were superseded by the creation of the Adventist Tertiary Network (South Pacific), which includes Avondale College of Higher Education (Australia), Pacific Adventist University (PNG), Fulton College (Fiji), Sonoma Adventist College (PNG), Atoifi School of Nursing (Solomon Islands), and Mamarapha College (Australia).104

Other Developments

When the decision was taken to discontinue form 7, a foundation studies program was introduced to fill the gap and provide some students with another opportunity to enter tertiary study. In 2007 Fulton entered into an agreement with the University of the South Pacific to offer the USP foundation studies program on the Fulton campus, commencing second semester 2007.105 This arrangement was short-lived, as the costs of the program were double the figure expected.

Business was the last discipline to offer diplomas. Commencing in 1995, the Diploma of Accounting and Management was offered. Over time this was repackaged into three strands: accounting and management; business computing; and information technology. In 2005 Fulton College entered a franchise arrangement with the then Fiji Institute of Technology for the delivery of a subject within the business program.106 Subsequently additional subjects were added to this arrangement, with approximately one third of the Fulton College business program being franchised units. This arrangement concluded in 2011. In 2013 Fulton commenced offering its own three-strand Bachelor of Business [Accounting and Management], [Information Systems] and [Marketing].107

In response to the government’s policy review commencing in 2005 to increase the provision for early childhood education,108 Fulton introduced a Certificate of Early Childhood Education in 2009.109 It should be noted that as early as 1970 it was planned to introduce an infant teacher program.110 In 2012 this was upgraded to a Diploma in Education [ECE] and in 2015 a Bachelor of Education [ECE].111

Fiji Higher Education Commission

In the light of the new Fiji Qualifications Framework (FQF), Fulton realigned its curriculum and submitted applications to the FHEC for accreditation of all of Fulton’s on-campus programs. In April 2015 the Fiji Higher Education Commission accredited all of Fulton’s diplomas (level 6) as well as the Certificate in Foundation Studies (level 4).112 Later that year Fulton was the first institution to have a degree program, Bachelor of Education [Primary] (level 7) approved under the new FQF.113 Fulton’s postgraduate diplomas (level 8) and degrees (level 7) in education and theology were also approved by the FHEC.114 The theology awards were also accredited by SPATS.115

The Contribution of Fulton

In 1908 Septimus Carr, the first principal of the Fiji Training Institute, and Peni Tavodi, a student from the Fiji Training Institute, went as pioneer missionaries to Bisiatabu, Papua.116 Since that time, and following their example, many other graduates and students have served as missionaries throughout the western regions of the South Pacific.

Since the first official graduation from Fulton Missionary College in 1949, more than three thousand seven hundred students, of which almost half have been teachers, have graduated to serve the church and communities throughout the South Pacific. Some have assumed significant responsibilities in both the church and the government. Many have also progressed to postgraduate qualifications at a range of institutions.117

Principals of Fulton 118

Fiji Training Institute Buresala, Ovalau (1905–1917)

1905–1907 Septimus W. Carr (1878-1972)
1908–1910 Andrew G. Stewart (1881-1975)
1911–1912 George E. Marriott (1876-1958)
1913–1914 Harold C. White (1888-1928)
1915–1919 Harry R. Martin (1874-1937)


Central Polynesian Training Institute (1918–1921)

1920–1921 Septimus W. Carr (1878-1972)


Buresala Training School (1922–1939)

1922–1924           Cyril S. Palmer (1893-1977)
1925–1928 Gordon Branster  (1896-1987)
1929–1930 Septimus W. Carr (1878-1972)
1931–1932 Cyril S. Palmer (1893-1977)
1933–1934 Harry R. Steed (1897-1941)
1935–1937 Leonard V. Wilkinson (1906-1997)
1938 Royce W. Lane (1894-?)
1939 Arthur P. Dyason (1908-1988)
1940 Under the direction of Arthur Dyason,
Buresala relocated from Ovalau to
Tailevu and merged with Navuso School,
the teacher training components of
Samabula Indian  School and Vatuvonu School.


Fulton Missionary School Korovou, Tailevu (1941–1948)

1941 Andrew G. Stewart (1881-1975)
1942–1948 Arthur P. Dyason (1908-1988)


Fulton Missionary College (1949–1970)

1949–1955  Leslie S. Wood (1912-2005)
1956–1958 Alfred W. (Pop) Martin (1899-1988)
1959–1964 Arthur P. Dyason (1908-1988)
1965–1971 John Cernik (1915-1999)


Fulton College (1971–2018)

1972–1973         M. P. (Bert) Cozens 
1974–1977 Allen E. Sonter
1978–1979 Alex S. Currie
1980–1983 John L. Wilson (1930-2013)
1984–1985 John G. Hammond
1986–1989 Allan G. Hedges
1990–1991 James S. Mea’ole (1949-2012)
1992–2000 Nemani W. Tausere
2001 Beverley J. Norman
2002–2005 Murray W. Chapman
2006–2007 Anthony L. Hay
2008–2010 Joseph Pitakia 
2011–2014 Stephen J. Currow
Fulton relocated from Tailevu to Sabeto in 2014.


Fulton Adventist University College, Sabeto (2014– )

2014-2016 Stephen J. Currow                     
2017- Glynn Galo

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———. “Report of the Fiji Mission Field.” Australasian Record, October 1, 1906.

———. “The Winds and Waves Obey His Voice.” Australasian Record, June 15, 1905.

Prendeville, Kerry. Kerry Prendeville to Colin Winch, August 3, 1989.

Ramswarup, Gautum. “Dining Room.” Fulton Review 3, no. 1 (July 1960).

Roenfelt, E. E. “The Island Mission Field.” Australian Union Conference Bulletin, September 10, 1940.

Rogers, H. E. Yearbook of Seventh-day Adventist Denomination: The Official Directories, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917.

Rogers, Viola M. “South Sea Mission Work.” Australian Record, July 29, 1935.

Rudge, E. B. “Our Island Fields.” Australasian Record, January 6, 1941.

———. “The Fiji Mission.” Australasian Record, October 16, 1922.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1904–1972.

Siga, Amelia. “Approval of Accreditation Provider Programs.” Amelia Siga to the principal, Fulton College. April 28, 2015.

Singh, Kenneth. “Mastereji: An Indian Teacher’s Service in Fiji SDA Mission.” Journal of Pacific Adventist History 5, no. 1 (June 2005).

Sommerfeld, C. E. “First Graduation at Fulton.” Australasian Record, April 10, 1950.

Sonter, A. "We Remember the ’70s: The Expanding Years." Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

Sonter, Allen. “Fulton College in the ’70s.” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

“South Pacific Division.” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, Seventh-day Adventist Commentary Reference Series. Hagerstown, Maryland: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996.

“Special Request for Central Training College.” Fiji Committee Meeting No. 7, March 10, 1940.

Stakelroth, Jarrod. “Fulton College Opens New Campus.” Record, March 1, 2014.

Steley, Dennis. Unfinished: The Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the South Pacific Excluding Papua New Guinea, 1886–1986. Unpublished dissertation, University of Auckland, 1990.

Stewart, A. G. “Central Polynesian Mission.” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914.

———. “Fulton Missionary School.” Australasian Record, July 7, 1941.

———. “Good News From Fulton Missionary College.” Australasian Record, June 16, 1941.

“Summary of the Commission Proceedings.” South Pacific Division Commission on Tertiary Training in the Pacific, November 2007.

Tausere, Nemani W. “Reporting the Effects of Cyclone Kina on Fulton College.” The Fultonian—Special Edition, January 14, 1993.

“The address of J. E. Fulton . . .” Union Conference Recorder, June 15, 1905.

“The Stories of Our Missions for 1909: As Told by Our Missionaries in All Lands—Fiji Mission.” Review and Herald 87, no. 24 (June 16, 1910).

“This Is It: Faith Sees Fulton in the Not Far Distant Future.” Fulton Review 3, no. 1 (July 1960).

Townend, Brian. “Interview With A. P. Dyason.” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

———. “Life in the ’50s.” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

“Trans Pacific Union Mission.” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Hagerstown, Maryland: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2002.

“Tuvalu.” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, Seventh-day Adventist Commentary Reference Series. Hagerstown, Maryland: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996.

Vuloaloa, Seme T. “Sabbath, August 5: Fiji.” Mission Quarterly, July 1, 1950.

Watson, C. H. “Appointment of A. G. Stewart to Fiji.” Australasian Record, January 27, 1941.

Wilkinson, L. V. “New School in Buca Bay, Fiji.” Australasian Record, September 4, 1933.

Wilkinson, Ray. “We Remember the ’60s: The Exciting Years.” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

Wilkinson, Ray, and Kuresa Taga’i. “The Adventist System.” In Ron Crocombe and Malama Meleisea, eds. Pacific Universities: Achievements, Problems, and Prospects. Suva, Fiji: Institute of Pacific Studies, 1988.

Notes

  1. E. H. Gates, “From the Pitcairn—Fiji, September 6, 1891,” ARH 68, No. 44 (November 10, 1891): 694.

  2. “From a Fiji letter . . . ,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, February 15, 1892, 64.

  3. Viola M. Rogers, “South Sea Mission Work,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935, 6.

  4. Milton Hook, Lotu Savasava (Wahroonga, NSW: Education Department South Pacific Division), 3, 4; Seme T. Vuloaloa, “Sabbath, August 5: Fiji,” Mission Quarterly, July 1, 1950, 11.

  5. Hook, 5, 6.

  6. John Fulton, “School Exercises in Fiji,” The Missionary Magazine, November 1898, 414.

  7. Floyd Greenleaf, In Passion for the World: A History of Seventh-day Adventist Education (Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2005), 165.

  8. E. H. Gates, “Council Meeting in Fiji,” ARH 81, No. 9 (March 3, 1904): 14, 15; “Council Meeting in Fiji,” Union Conference Recorder, May 15, 1904, 2, 3.

  9. According to the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook for this period, Fulton College has been known as: Fiji Training Institute (1904–1916); Central Polynesian Training Institute (1917–1921); Buresala Training Institute (1922–1940); Fulton Training Institute (1941–1945), Fulton Missionary School (1946–1949); Fulton Missionary College (1950–1971); Fulton College (1972– ). It should be noted that although the Yearbook names the institution as the Fulton Training School (1941–1945), articles published in the Australasian Record about the opening of the new campus at Korovou refer to the institution as the Fulton Missionary School. The Yearbook also reverts from Fulton Missionary College to Fulton Missionary School for the period 1954–1958.

  10. See “Fiji Training School,” Union Conference Recorder, May 1, 1905, 4, 5. The six reasons given at the meeting in February 1905 were:

    1. Suvavou is too close to the town and its evils.

    2. The ten acres of land were insufficient to support a large number of students.

    3. Suvavou is not central to the islands.

    4. Suvavou lacks streams of water.

    5. The climate is very moist at Suvavou, making it almost impossible for our workers to keep in health.

    6. Wood for fuel is scarce and very highly priced at Suvavou.

  11. C. H. Parker, “Council Meeting in Fiji,” Union Conference Recorder, January 15, 1905, 6.

  12. S. W. Carr, “Buresala, Our Fijian School,” Union Conference Recorder, October 7, 1907, 7; C. H. Parker, “The Winds and the Waves Obey His Voice,” Union Conference Recorder, June 15, 1905, 3.

  13. “The address of J. E. Fulton . . . ,” Union Conference Recorder, June 15, 1905, 7. The mission headquarters under A. G. Stewart returned to Suvavou in June 1911. See E. H. Gates, “Experiences in Fiji,” Australasian Record, July 10, 1911, 4.

  14. Parker, “The Winds and the Waves Obey His Voice,” 3.

  15. C. H. Parker, “Report of the Fiji Mission Field,” Union Conference Recorder, October 1, 1906, 33.

  16. Alexander Shand Currie, “Strategies for Seventh-day Adventist Theological Education in the South Pacific Islands” (unpublished EdD dissertation, Andrews University 1977), 98.

  17. C. H. Parker, “Fiji,” Union Conference Recorder, April 30, 1906, 3, 4; see Buresala Training School Fiji.

  18. Because of the organization of the Central Polynesian Conference in 1916, the Fiji Training Institute became known as the Central Polynesian Training Institute. See H. E. Rogers, Yearbook of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination: The Official Directories, 1917 (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917), 145, 181.

  19. This expansion was a consequence of the missionary work of Pauliasi Bunoa in 1918 among those influenced by two “messianic” Fijians Apolosi R. Nawai of the Viti Company and Sailosi Nagusalevu of the “Number 8” cargo cult, who also worshipped on Sabbath (Saturday). See Ernest J. Krause, “The Great Awakening in Fiji During World War I,” in Arthur J. Ferch, Symposium on Adventist History in the South Pacific: 1885–1918 (Wahroonga, NSW: South Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists, 1986), 174–188.

  20. E. B. Rudge, “The Fiji Mission,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1922, 41.

  21. R. W. Lane, “Closing Exercises at Wainibuka School, Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 28, 1935, 2.

  22. C. H. Parker, “Our Training Centres in Fiji—Part 2,” Missionary Leader, June 1928, 7, 8. See also H. R. Martin, “Educational Work in Fiji,” Australasian Record, March 14, 1927, 3.

  23. G. M. Masters, “The Indian School, Fiji,” Australasian Record, February 13, 1928, 3.

  24. Miss J. Mitchell was appointed in 1939 to direct the teacher training program at Vatuvonu. Australasian Union Conference Executive Committee minutes, September 14, 1939, as cited by Daphne Halliday, “Training Primary Teachers at Fulton College, 1941–1959,” Journal of Pacific Adventist History 3, no. 2 (December 2003): 29.

  25. C. H. Watson, “Appointment of A. G. Stewart to Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 27, 1941, 8.

  26. E. B. Rudge, “Our Island Fields,” Australasian Record, January 6, 1941, 3.

  27. Brian Townend, “Interview With A. P. Dyason, 1988,” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

  28. “Special Request for Central Training College,” Fiji Committee Meeting no. 7, March 10, 1940.

  29. A. G. Stewart, “Fulton Missionary School,” Australasian Record, July 7, 1941, 5.

  30. Henry E. McMahon, “Fulton Missionary School, the Avondale of the Pacific,” Australasian Record, December 9, 1946, 3.

  31. E. E. Roenfelt, “The Island Mission Field,” Australian Union Conference Bulletin, September 10, 1940, 11.

  32. A. G. Stewart, “Good News From Fulton Missionary College,” Australasian Record, June 16, 1941, 3.

  33. It comprised the Pacific island nations of Fiji, Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Gilbert and Ellice Islands (now Kiribati and Tuvalu), New Caledonia, New Hebrides (now Vanuatu), Nauru, Niue, Pitcairn, Samoa, and Tonga. See David Hay and Eric Howse, “Decentralisation in the Australasian Division: Establishing the Central Pacific Union Mission in Suva, Fiji, 1948 and Onwards,” Journal of Pacific Adventist History 3, no. 2 (December 2003): 19–28. In 1972 the Central Pacific Union was reorganized to include Fiji, Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Niue, Pitcairn, Samoa, and Tonga. In 1985 Tuvalu was also returned to the Central Pacific Union. See “South Pacific Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, Seventh-day Adventist Commentary Reference Series (Hagerstown, Maryland: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996), 11:654; “Tuvalu,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 11:803.

  34. “Minutes,” Central Pacific Union Mission, December 12, 1948 (Wahroonga), 2, record the action to make Fulton a union institution from January 1, 1949, and “Minutes,” Central Pacific Union Mission, February 21, 1949, 14, record the action to change the name from Fulton Missionary School to Fulton Missionary College. See Hay and Howse, 21.

  35. C. E. Sommerfeld, “First Graduation at Fulton,” Australasian Record, April 10, 1950, 4, 5.

  36. Gautum Ramswarup, “Dining Room,” Fulton Review 3, no. 1 (July 1960): 20, 21.

  37. “This Is It: Faith Sees Fulton in the Not Far Distant Future,” Fulton Review 3 no. 1 (July 1960).

  38. The new building was designed by Gordon J. Larsen and Associates Architects, Suva, in April 1962 and built by Bidesi and Sons at a cost of $60,000. See Ray Wilkinson, “We Remember the ‘60s: The Exciting Years,” Makosoi 50th Anniversary, 1991; R. A. Millsom, “Fulton Lifts Its Head,” Australasian Record, July 20, 1964, 8, 9.

  39. Stephen J. Currow, “Fulton Leases Around Korovou,” in Stephen J. Currow and L. Bruce Potter, The Fulton Story (Sabeto, Fiji: Fulton Academic Press, 2015), 117–119.

  40. “Name ‘Fulton College’ 71/46,” Central Pacific Union Mission Executive Committee minutes, January 10, 1971, 14.

  41. L. A. Lansdown, “Operation Fly ’n’ Build,” Australasian Record, April 26, 1971, 8, 9, 14.

  42. Currow and Potter, 56.

  43. Nemani W. Tausere, “Reporting the Effects of Cyclone Kina on Fulton College,” The Fultonian—Special Edition, January 14, 1993.

  44. Tausere served as principal of Fulton College for nine years (1992–2000). See Currow and Potter, 56.

  45. In 2000 the Central Pacific Union was renamed Trans Pacific Union and reconfigured to include the island nations of American Samoa, Fiji, Isle of Pine, Kiribati, Loyalty Islands, Nauru, Niue, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. See “Trans Pacific Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, Maryland: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2002), 310.

  46. Memorandum of Understanding Between Fulton Teachers College, Trans Pacific Union Mission, and the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports, Republic of the Fiji Islands, December 4, 2006. This MoU with the Ministry of Education was scheduled to be signed on December 9, 2006. However, as the fourth military coup unfolded on Friday, December 6, 2006, the document was not signed.

  47. “Higher Education Promulgation 2008 [no. 24 of 2008], “Fiji Islands Government Gazette Supplement, Legal Notice 90, November 27, 2009, 621–678.

  48. Fiji Higher Education Commission, [accessed January 22, 2012]. http://www.fhec.gov.fj/about/vision-a-mission.

  49. “This is to certify that Fulton College is registered with the Fiji Higher Education Commission as a university college for the period from 7/11/2012 to 7/11/2017 as required by the Fiji Higher Education Promulgation 2008.” See “Certificate of Registration,” Fiji Higher Education Commission, Registration Number of the Institution 0004/11, Certificate RG 0016, November 11, 2012.

  50. Sera Lee, advisor, research project for general manager, to the principal, Fulton College, May 22, 2001.

  51. Niko Nawaikula, board secretary/manager, legal services, N. L. Nawainika [sic] No. 1, Namalata, Tailevu, Niko Nawaikula to Tevita Fa, August 7, 2001.

  52. Currow and Potter, 127–131, 136–138.

  53. Ratu Neumi Leqataqa, Jonasa Turagarua, and Evineri Misikana, Notice of Eviction, Notice to Australasian Conference Association Limited trading as Fulton College Sawanika, Tailevu, n.d. See also “Landowners Issue Eviction Notice to Fulton College,” Fiji Times, January 1, 2008, [accessed August 9, 2013]. http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=77712.

  54. “Minute 66.26–Fulton College Relocation Committee and Subcommittees,” TPU Officers’ minutes, February 12, 2008. Voted a Relocation Committee with the following five subcommittees: Site Location Subcommittee, Land Development Subcommittee, Building Subcommittee, Program & Resource Subcommittee and Contingency Plans Subcommittee.

  55. Lease, NLTB no. 6/10/11246: For Religious, Educational, and Charitable Purpose, November 8, 2010.

  56. Jarrod Stakelroth, “Fulton College Opens New Campus,” Record, March 1, 2014, 9.

  57. “This is to certify that Fulton Adventist University College is registered with the Fiji Higher Education Commission as a university college for the period from 21/11/2018 to 21/11/2023 as required by the Fiji Higher Education Promulgation 2008.” See “Certificate of Registration,” Fiji Higher Education Commission, Registration Number of the Institution 0004/11, Certificate RG 0066, November 21, 2018.

  58. E. Meyers, “Our Indian Mission, Fiji,” Australasian Record, 2 June 1913, 4.

  59. E. B. Rudge, “The Fiji Mission,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1922, 41.

  60. Dennis Steley, Unfinished: The Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the South Pacific Excluding Papua New Guinea, 1886–1986 (unpublished dissertation, University of Auckland, 1990): 490.

  61. Stewart, “Fulton Missionary School.”

  62. E. Meyers, 4.

  63. Kenneth Singh, “Master-ji: An Indian Teacher’s Service in the Fiji SDA Mission,” Journal of Pacific Adventist History 5, no. 1 (June 2005): 28–30.

  64. C. H. Parker, “Progress in Fiji,” Australasian Record, July 12, 1920, 3, 4.

  65. Rudge, “The Fiji Mission.”

  66. Lane, 2.

  67. L. V. Wilkinson, “New School at Buca Bay, Fiji,” Australasian Record, September 4, 1933, 2, 3.

  68. Watson, 8.

  69. “Form Five,” Fulton Review 1959, May 1959, 19. See also Brian Townend, “Life in the ’50s,” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

  70. “Certificate of Registration of a School, no. 2531,” Education Department, Colony of Fiji, July 31, 1968.

  71. W. J. Driscoll, “Education in Modern Fiji,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1970, 8.

  72. S. Otsuka, Cultural Influences on Academic Performance in Fiji: A Case Study in the Nadronga/Navosa Province (unpublished EdD dissertation, University of Sydney, 2006), 28, [accessed January 25, 2012]. http://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/ bitstream/2123/1416/2/ 02whole.pdf.

  73. Usaia Baravi, “Fulton College in the ’80s,” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991.

  74. Currow and Potter, 56.

  75. Ibid.

  76. Alexander S. Currie, “In the Wake of Pitcairn: Establishing Adventism in the South Pacific Islands,” Spectrum, 1988, 57–62.

  77. F. K. Bera, president of Fiji Mission, to A. S. Currie, August 23, 1976, as cited in Currie, “Strategies.”

  78. A. G. Stewart, “Central Polynesian Mission,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914, 41.

  79. H. R. Martin, “Buresala, Fiji,” Australasian Record, March 26, 1917, 3.

  80. Stewart, “Fulton Missionary School.”

  81. Steley, 477; Stephen J. Currow, “Fulton’s History in the Context of Pacific Higher Education,” in Currow and Potter, 101.

  82. Currow, “Fulton’s History in Context,” in Currow and Potter, 102.

  83. Stephen J. Currow, “Sixty-five Years of Graduates: 1949–2014,” in Currow and Potter, 113.

  84. Currow, “Fulton’s History in Context,” in Currow and Potter, 102.

  85. “Congratulations,” Fulton Review 1959, May 1959, 24, 25.

  86. “Examination Results, 1960,” Fulton Review, 21st Anniversary, November 1960, 64.

  87. “Advice comes from Suva . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 11, 1963, 16; Currow, “Sixty-five Years of Graduates,” in Currow and Potter, 115.

  88. Allen Sonter, “Fulton College in the 1970s,” Makosoi 50th Anniversary Special Souvenir Edition, 1991; “Minute 75/64,” Domestic Arts Course Curriculum, Central Pacific Union Mission Executive Committee, May 22, 1975; and “Minute 75/147,” Industrial Arts Course Curriculum, Central Pacific Union Mission Executive Committee Meeting, August 20, 1975.

  89. Currow, “Fulton’s History in Context,” in Currow and Potter, 103.

  90. Ibid.

  91. Ray Wilkinson and Kuresa Taga’i, “The Adventist System,” in Ron Crocombe and Malama Meleisea, eds.; Pacific Universities: Achievements, Problems, and Prospects (Suva, Fuji: Institute of Pacific Studies, 1988), 233.

  92. Baravi, “Fulton College in the 80s.”

  93. Ibid.

  94. “BR 88:05 Minute,” Board of Regents, June 1, 1988. Voted: To grant initial accreditation to Fulton College (C-4/S-1) for 3½ years to December 31, 1990, subject to terms and conditions stated on report (two items). John Wesley-Taylor V, email to Stephen Currow, January 6, 2012,

  95. After a preliminary meeting on July 21, 1989, the SPATS visitation team, Jacques Nicole and Kerry Prendeville, visited the college September 7 and 8, 1989. The recommendation of the team was approved by the Accreditation Committee of SPATS on October 30, 1989, and, the college was given a five-year term from November 1989. See correspondence to Colin Winch, chair of Fulton board, from Kerry Prendeville, secretary of the visitation committee (August 3, 1989) and correspondence to Allan Hedges, principal of Fulton College, from Larry Hannan, president of SPATS (November 20, 1989).

  96. Correspondence to S. J. Currow, chair of theology, Fulton College, from Jacques Nicole, acting principal of Pacific Theological College, August 9, 1989.

  97. Stephen J. Currow, “History of Seventh-day Adventist Theological Education in the Pacific: 1989–1992” (unpublished paper).

  98. Currow and Potter, 36.

  99. Ibid.

  100. “Summary of the Commission Proceedings,” South Pacific Division Commission on Tertiary Training in the Pacific, November 2007.

  101. “Affiliation Stakeholders Meeting Minutes,” Pacific Adventist University, August 29, 2010.

  102. “Minute 28/08,” Fulton College Board meeting, September 22, 2008.

  103. The Bachelor of Education (Primary) with a nested Diploma of Education was finalized in September 2008, Bachelor of Arts (Theology) with a nested Diploma of Theology in March 2009 and the Diploma in Business in August 2009. See Stephen J. Currow, “PAU Affiliation TPU Analysis” (unpublished document, personal files of author, May 20, 2012).

  104. The initial meeting was held in Sydney on February 19, 2014. Linden Chuang, “New Era for Higher Education,” Record, March 15, 2014, 3.

  105. “Minute 9/07,” Fulton College Board meeting, March 13, 2007.

  106. The franchise agreement was signed by Fulton on February 24, 2005, and ratified by Fuji Institute of Technology on March 1, 2005. Agenda, Fulton College Board, March 20, 2005.

  107. Currow, “Sixty-five Years of Graduates,” in Currow and Potter, 113, 114.

  108. Education for All: Mid-Decade Assessment Report: Fiji 2008, Government of Fiji: Ministry of Education, National Heritage, Culture, and Arts.

  109. See “Minute 32/08,” Fulton College Board meeting, September 22, 2008.

  110. “Five-Year Plan for Expansion of CPUM Secondary and College Educational Programme,” Central Pacific Union Mission Executive Committee meeting, January 12, 1969.

  111. Currow, “Sixty-five Years of Graduates,” in Currow and Potter, 114.

  112. Amelia Siga, “Approval of Accreditation Provider Programs,” to the principal, Fulton College, April 28, 2015.

  113. “This is to certify that the programme Bachelor of Education (Honors) Primary offered by the Fulton University College has been accredited at level 8 of the Fiji Qualifications Framework by the Fiji Higher Education Commission in accordance with the Higher Education (Qualifications) Regulations 2010 for a period of five (5) years. Date of approval October 14, 2015. Date of Expiry October 13, 2020.” See “Certificate of Accreditation,” Fiji Higher Education Commission, Accreditation Number 0009/15, August 12, 2016.

  114. “This is to certify that the programme Bachelor of Theology (Honors) offered by the Fulton University College has been accredited at level 8 of the Fiji Qualifications Framework by the Fiji Higher Education Commission in accordance with the Higher Education (Qualifications) Regulations 2010 for a period of five (5) years. Date of approval June 30, 2016. Date of Expiry June 29, 2021.” See “Certificate of Accreditation,” Fiji Higher Education Commission, Accreditation Number 0001/16, July 5, 2016.

  115. “The Council of the South Pacific Association of Theological Schools hereby grants Fulton College accreditation of degree programs in Bachelor’s Theology Honors from 2014 to 2019. See “Accreditation Certificate,” South Pacific Association of Theological Schools, October 29, 2015.

  116. Currie, “Strategies.”

  117. For a list and analysis of graduating cohorts since 1949, see “Sixty-five Years of Graduates,” in Currow and Potter, 113–115.

  118. Updated from Currow, “Fulton’s History in Context,” in Currow and Potter, 99-107.

×

Currow, Stephen J. "Fulton Adventist University College." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 01, 2020. Accessed August 03, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=47WC.

Currow, Stephen J. "Fulton Adventist University College." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 01, 2020. Date of access August 03, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=47WC.

Currow, Stephen J. (2020, June 01). Fulton Adventist University College. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved August 03, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=47WC.