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Back row (L-R): H. C. Hartman, Carl Edwards, Vernon Becker, Ordell Rees, Jack Blacker; Front row: Albert Milner, Dan Butherus, Lyol Netteburg, Reuben Nightingale, Robert Osmunson, Owen T. Garner (1950s, Minneapolis, Minnesota).

Photo courtesy of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Archives.

Hartman, Harvey Clarence (1900–1960) and Maude Isabell (Carr) (1899–1989)

By Sabrina Riley

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Sabrina Riley was born in Auburn, New York and raised in Dowagiac, Michigan. She received a B.A. in history from Andrews University and an M.A. in information and libraries studies from the University of Michigan. Riley was a member of Andrews University’s library staff from 1998 to 2003, library director and college archivist at Union College from 2003 to 2016, and is presently a freelance researcher, author, and information professional.

 

Harvey Clarence Hartman, an Adventist educator and administrator, taught in numerous academies and served as an administrator at several Adventist academies and colleges. His wife, Maude Isabell Carr, a pianist, taught music at the secondary level at several Adventist academies.

Early Life

Harvey Clarence Hartman was born on March 2, 1900, near Otis, Kansas. The only son of German Americans Charles Hartman and Fannie Westermeyer (1878–1902; 1882–1971), he had one sister, Viola Ida (1902–1985), who was born two months after their father’s death. She married Jacob Emile Frick and served the Adventist Church in Europe and China.1 A member of the Otis, Kansas, Seventh-day Adventist church, Charles Hartman died prematurely after being struck by lightning.2 Subsequently, Harvey Hartman and his sister were raised by their mother and her second husband, Jacob Lewis Mohr (1881–1977). Jacob and Fannie Mohr had five more children, Ethel Agnes (about 1906–unknown) who married Alfred Ochs, Manetta Winifred (1909–1995), who married Lutin Allen Haughey, Edmund Leonard (1911–1989), Willis Leroy (1915–1988), and Merle Howard (1922–1933).3

Education and Marriage

Hartman attended Clinton Theological Seminary in Clinton, Missouri, and Union College in Lincoln, Nebraska, graduating from Union College in 1921 with a Bachelor of Arts degree.4

On August 2, 1922, Hartman married Maude (Maudie) Isabell Carr, a native of Milton, Wisconsin.5 The daughter of Fred M. Carr and Maryetta Palmer, she was born on May 12, 1899, and attended Bethel Academy.6 Her sister Alice married Ray Fowler, who also later became a president of Union College. Maudie Carr attended Union College in 1914, taking the secondary level course, and then studied music at Hutchinson Theological Seminary.7 During the 1930s she took further coursework at Union College and graduated with a degree in education from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in 1939.8 Her teaching career began at Sheyenne River Academy in 1920,9 where it appears she met Harvey Hartman. After their marriage she followed her husband’s career path teaching music at Sheyenne River Academy, Plainview Academy, Enterprise Academy, Oak Park Academy, Union College Academy, and Sunnydale Academy.10 Harvey and Maude Hartman had one daughter, Marceline V. (1925–unknown), who married Calvin Ernest Biggs (1924–1966).11

Career

Upon graduation from Union College, Harvey Hartman taught science and math at Sheyenne River Academy in 1921–1922.12 Following their marriage in August of 1922, the newlyweds moved to Plainview Academy, where they taught from 1922 to 1928,13 with the exception of one year, when they taught at Enterprise Academy.14 In 1928 Harvey Hartman was made principal of Plainview Academy,15 a position he held until he moved to Oak Park Academy in 1934, where he also served as principal. Under Hartman’s leadership, Oak Park Academy’s enrollment more than tripled.16

Hartman was first called to Union College in as business manager in 1935, a position he held until 1945. Recognized for his ability to raise money for the college even in the midst the Great Depression, students nicknamed him “Hard Cash Hartman.” During his tenure as business manager, Union College’s building program boomed. Construction included the first library building, an agricultural building, replacement of the gymnasium, and Jorgensen Hall—a science classroom building. In addition, funds were raised for a new music building eventually named Engel Hall. Along with Neil Rowland, Hartman also established a furniture factory on campus, providing employment for students.17 In 1940 he was ordained by General Conference president J. L. McElhany.18

In 1945 Hartman left Union College to develop a new academy for the Missouri Conference in Centralia. While he supervised the construction of the new academy building, he also recruited students. When Sunnydale opened in the fall of 1946 with Hartman as its first principal, 126 students enrolled.19 In 1947 Hartman moved to Walla Walla College, where he was treasurer and business manager until 1950. Under his stewardship Walla Walla College’s net worth grew significantly.20

Hartman returned to Union College in 1950 as president. His presidency continued to see the growth of college facilities. The College View church added an annex, the Don Love Industrial Building (home of the furniture factory) was enlarged, and the men’s residence hall was replaced with New South Hall (now known as Culver Hall).21

When administration of the Boulder and Porter sanitariums and hospitals was divided in1957, Hartman was called to be administrator and treasurer of the Boulder-Colorado Sanitarium and Hospital. When he arrived, funds were already in place to rebuild and enlarge the institution, a project he supervised.22

Throughout his career Hartman served on many governing boards, including those of Home Study International, Christian Record Braille, Southwestern Junior College, and Union College.

An Untimely Death

In the summer of 1960 Hartman visited his parents’ farm for a few days of vacation. While helping with the farm work, he was fatally injured in a tractor accident. Hartman died on July 11, 1960, in La Crosse, Kansas.23 Following her husband’s death, Maude Hartman continued to live in Boulder, Colorado, where she served as a church organist. She died on March 22, 1989, in Loma Linda, California.24

Contribution

Harvey C. Hartman was an astute and gifted business manager. Wherever he served, campuses flourished, enrollment grew, and facilities were improved and enlarged.

Sources

“Bethel News Notes.” Lake Union Herald, April 22, 1914.

Campbell, M. V. “Welcome to President and Mrs. Harvey C. Hartman.” Central Union Reaper, September 5, 1950.

Carcich, Theodore. “Hartman Accepts Administratorship of Boulder Sanitarium.” Central Union Reaper, May 14, 1957.

“Carr–Hartman marriage.” Educational Messenger, September 1922.

“Charles Hartman obituary.” ARH, July 22, 1902.

“College of Liberal Arts.” Educational Messenger, June 1921.

The Cornhusker. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska, 1939.

Dale, L. C. “Fanny Westermeyer Mohr obituary.” Central Union Reaper, March 28, 1972.

Dick, Everett, George Gibson, and Union College staff. Union College: Light Upon the Hill. Lincoln, Nebraska: Union College, Alumni Association, 2004.

“Fannie Mohr.” Find a Grave. Accessed July 5, 2019. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91249021.

“Former President Hartman Dies in Kansas.” Clock Tower, July 24, 1960.

“Harvey C. Hartman obituary.” ARH, September 29, 1960.

“Maudie Hartman obituary.” Pacific Union Recorder, November 20, 1989.

“Seminary Pencilgrams.” Northern Union Reaper, March 18, 1918.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920–1960.

“Viola Ida Frick obituary.” Mid-America Adventist Outlook, July 5, 1985.

Notes

  1. “Viola Ida Frick obituary,” Mid-America Adventist Outlook, July 5, 1985, 18.

  2. “Charles Hartman obituary,” ARH, July 22, 1902, 23.

  3. “Fannie Mohr,” Find a Grave, accessed July 5, 2019, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/91249021; L. C. Dale, “Fanny Westermeyer Mohr obituary,” Central Union Reaper, March 28, 1972, 11.

  4. “Harvey C. Hartman obituary,” ARH, September 29, 1960, 26; “College of Liberal Arts,” Educational Messenger, June 1921, 7.

  5. “Carr–Hartman marriage,” Educational Messenger, September 1922, 24.

  6. “Bethel News Notes,” Lake Union Herald, April 22, 1914, 8.

  7. “Seminary Pencilgrams,” Northern Union Reaper, March 18, 1918, 5.

  8. “Maudie I. Hartman,” The Cornhusker (Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska, 1939), 72; email from Union College alumni director Kenna Lee Carlson, July 15, 2019.

  9. “Sheyenne River Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 168.

  10. “Union College Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1945), 253; see notes 12–16 for the dates and places of Harvey and Maude Hartman’s employment.

  11. “Former President Hartman Dies in Kansas,” Clock Tower, July 24, 1960, 1.

  12. “Sheyenne River Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 178.

  13. “Plainview Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1923), 200; “Plainview Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1927), 259; “Plainview Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1928), 278.

  14. “Enterprise Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 229.

  15. “Plainview Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1929), 287.

  16. “Oak Park Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1935), 241, 244; M. V. Campbell, “Welcome to President and Mrs. Harvey C. Hartman,” Central Union Reaper, September 5, 1950, 1.

  17. Everett Dick, George Gibson, and Union College staff, Union College: Light Upon the Hill (Lincoln, Nebraska: Union College Alumni Association, 2004), 169.

  18. “Harvey C. Hartman obituary.”

  19. “Sunnydale Academy,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1946), 264; Campbell, “Welcome to President and Mrs. Harvey C. Hartman.”

  20. “Walla Walla College,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1947), 267, 268; Campbell, “Welcome to President and Mrs. Harvey C. Hartman.”

  21. Dick, Gibson, and Union College staff.

  22. Campbell, “Welcome to President and Mrs. Harvey C. Hartman”; Theodore Carcich, “Hartman Accepts Administratorship of Boulder Sanitarium,” Central Union Reaper, May 14, 1957, 1.

  23. “Harvey C. Hartman obituary”; “Former President Hartman Dies in Kansas.”

  24. “Maudie Hartman obituary,” Pacific Union Recorder, November 20, 1989, 31.

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Riley, Sabrina. "Hartman, Harvey Clarence (1900–1960) and Maude Isabell (Carr) (1899–1989)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed June 20, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=79FY.

Riley, Sabrina. "Hartman, Harvey Clarence (1900–1960) and Maude Isabell (Carr) (1899–1989)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access June 20, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=79FY.

Riley, Sabrina (2021, April 28). Hartman, Harvey Clarence (1900–1960) and Maude Isabell (Carr) (1899–1989). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 20, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=79FY.