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Don L. Aalborg served as a pastor-evangelist and in conference administration as a youth director, educational superintendent, executive secretary and president, during 37 years of ministry, 23 of them in the Georgia-Cumberland Conference.

​George Abbott, physician and author, was the first dean of what became the School of Medicine at Loma Linda University and served for more than three decades in the roles of medical director and surgeon at leading Adventist sanitariums. Dr. Cora Richards Abbott, an obstetrician, engaged in medical ministry in tandem with her husband.

William E. Abernathy served the church for 36 years primarily in the roles of institutional management and financial administration.

​Clinton Achenbach was an American missionary who served during the early phases of Adventist work in the Spanish-speaking lands of Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Cuba and the Dominican Republic.

Dorothy Evans Ackerman taught voice lessons and directed choirs at several Adventist schools (especially Southern Missionary College, now Southern Adventist University).

Anderson Grant Adams was the 15th treasurer of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

​In 1904 delegates in the East Michigan Conference (EMC) voted to open what would become Adelphian Academy. At the time there were only five senior academies in the United States, and none of them were in Michigan. These were South Lancaster Academy, Mount Vernon Academy, Keene Academy, Southern Industrial School, and Oakwood Industrial School. There were twelve “intermediate” schools, which is how Adelphian began – as a ten grade school. Among these twelve intermediate schools was Cedar Lake Industrial Academy (1899), and Battle Creek Industrial School (1904).

Advent Christian Church was a group of former Millerite believers who organized themselves as the Advent Christian Association in 1860.

The "Advent Herald," initially entitled "Signs of the Times," was the first periodical of the Millerite movement and the most enduring of those initiated in the early 1840s.

​The first and only issue of the "Advent Mirror," published January 1845 in Boston, Massachusetts, proved to be a milestone in the development of Seventh-day Adventist teachings concerning the pre-advent judgment and final ministry of Christ in the heavenly sanctuary.

AdventHealth Shawnee Mission, previously known as Shawnee Mission Health and Shawnee Mission Medical Center, is a 504-bed hospital in Merriam, Kansas, that serves the Kansas City community with faith-based, whole-person care and a wide range of medical services.

AdventHealth University is a Seventh-day Adventist institution specializing in healthcare education in a faith-affirming environment. The physical facilities of AHU were established in 1992, and are still located, on the peninsula which separates Lake Winyah from Lake Estelle in Orlando, Florida next to Florida Hospital’s Orlando campus.

"Adventist Heritage" was a periodical that sought “to nourish an interest in Adventist history.” It catered both to scholars and general readers, covering both Seventh-day Adventist history and the broader field of Adventism.

The Adventist-Evangelical Conferences of 1955-1956 initiated by Protestant polemicist Walter R. Martin constituted a watershed development in the history of interfaith relationships between Adventists and evangelical Christians.

Wilfred Jonathan Airey was a renowned Adventist educator and an active participant in public institutions for higher education.

George Hillry Akers was a lifelong educator and administrator for the Seventh-day Adventist educational system.

Albany conference of Millerite Adventist leaders was held in Albany, New York, from April 29 to May 1, 1845.

Alberta Sanitarium was a health institution, later called the Bethel Sanitarium, operated by the Alberta Conference and the Western Canadian Union Conference between 1903 and 1925 at Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

​Edwin was a professor at Washington Missionary College (1915-1920). Later he became a prominent lawyer and law professor, serving for most of his career at Northwestern University. Barbara was a musician and professor of harmony and music history.

Humberto Noble Alexander was a Cuban Seventh-day Adventist evangelist, political prisoner, and survivor of a 22-year imprisonment in Cuba between 1962 and 1984.