Mountain View College Academy

Photo courtesy of Mountain View College Archive.

Mountain View College Academy

By Ma. Venus F. Borja, and Benedicto R. Borja

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Ma. Venus F. Borja (nee Fernandez), Ph.D. in nursing (Silliman University located in Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines), is a registered nurse and an assistant professor in the College of Nursing of Ha’il University, Ha’il Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. She is an active member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. Borja has a B.S. in nursing from Mountain View College (MVC), Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Philippines, and an M.S. in medical/surgical nursing from Silliman University, Dumaguete City, Philippines. She had served as nursing theories teacher for 16 years and as a research coordinator in the School of Nursing at Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines. She is married to Benedicto R. Borja and they have three children.

Benedicto R. Borja, Ph.D. in educational administration (Central Mindanao University, Musuan, Bukidnon, Philippines), is a licensed professional teacher (LPT) and a professor in the School of Theology of Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon. Philippines Borja is an ordained minister born in Pastrana, Leyte. He worked as a district pastor in the Negros Oriental-Siquijor Mission prior to his current teaching assignment in the School of Theology at Mountain View College (MVC). He is married to Maria Venus F. Borja and they have three children.

First Published: January 15, 2021

Mountain View College Academy (MVCA) is one of the secondary schools of the South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. Located on a beautiful plateau in the province of Bukidnon, it is overshadowed by the heights of Mounts Dulang-Dulang and Kalatungan—second and fourth highest mountains of the Philippines respectively. The 1,024-hectare campus includes farm, forest, and ranch for the support and training of students in the practical aspects of life.

Developments that Led to Establishment of the School

Starting as an extension school of the Adventist University of the Philippines (formerly Philippine Union College), Mountain View College opened its doors in July 19491 on the campus of the Mindanao Mission Academy in Manticao, Misamis Oriental, where it remained for four years. Andrew N. Nelson, the president of Philippine Union College and the extension school, with Wilton Baldwin, education secretary of the Far Eastern Division, and other Filipino Adventist local leaders, made the search for a suitable permanent location for Mountain View College.2 A list of criteria for the permanent site included ample water, potential hydroelectric power, sufficient land for food production, and a rural yet accessible locality.3

After many weeks of intensive research, a site was found. Before the end of 1950, they applied for one thousand hectares of government land.4 On August 4, 1952,5 Nelson and Virgil L. Bartlett, business manager of Mountain View College, with the help of local Adventist members, started negotiations on behalf of the Philippine Union Mission (PUM) for the fifty percent down payment necessary to secure the property.6 Basic industrial operations were begun in the same year,7 which included a sawmill; cultivation of agricultural land, and building construction.

In February 1952,8 the Far Eastern Division acted to separate the extension school from Philippine Union College with Andrew N. Nelson elected president and Virgil L. Bartlett elected business manager. On February 22-23, 1953,9 the name was changed to Mountain View College. The college’s move to Bukidon was completed during the 1953-1954 school year.10

Founding of the School

In 1954, academy classes were added to provide secondary education for the children of workers at the college.11 It started with an enrollment of seventy-eight students12 with sixteen in the first year, twenty-two in the second year, twenty-one in the third year, and nineteen in fourth year classes when it opened on June 14, 1954.13 MVCA was duly recognized from freshman to senior high by the Department of Education of the Republic of the Philippines.14 MVCA became a laboratory school for the college in 1962 when a bachelor’s degree of science in education program was added to MVCA’s curriculum.15 To meet the demand of neighboring communities for secondary education, MVCA started accepting students from different places.

During the early days, high school students used the college classrooms in the morning while the college students worked; the college students used the rooms in the afternoon while the high school students worked. When the number of high school curricular subjects (units) increased and the academy had to hold classes in the morning and afternoon, the need to construct a separate high school building became apparent.

History of the School

During the 1980s, classes were held in the old college library, which was demolished in 2001. MVCA occupied four rooms for the classes and one room for the principal’s office. All church services were conducted in the Faith Elementary School chapel, and the daily chapel programs were held in the worship hall of Pearl Hall (girls’ dormitory). Later, all church services and chapel programs were held at Pearl Hall.

In 1985, the administration of Mountain View College moved MVCA to another temporary location in the former extension school girls’ dormitory as plans were made to construct permanent structures for the secondary institution. Classes were held there with church services and chapel programs held in Onyx Hall. When the MVC Alumni Church was finished in 1993, MVCA used the Florence Kern Auditorium for its extracurricular activities.

In her fiftieth anniversary year, MVCA found a permanent home. Although not fully furnished in June 2003, the new administration building, which housed three classrooms, one faculty room, principal’s office and four other offices, and the library, served the needs of the students and faculty. In December 2006, Agripino Segovia donated PhP 800,000.00 for the completion of the right wing, which housed two classrooms.

In 2015, MVCA facilities included a principal’s office with eleven other offices, five classrooms, a canteen, a teacher’s lounge, an accreditation room, an audio-visual/music room, a science laboratory, a computer laboratory, a library, and a five-roomed guest house. Although the building interiors were completed in 2015, the exteriors were not completed until 2016.16

When the Philippine Government transitioned from a four-year to a six-year secondary education program in 2016, MVCA enthusiastically expanded its curriculum to comply. The Department of

Education of the Republic of the Philippines permitted MVCA to operate a senior high school program offering four tracks and nine specializations known as strands. The tracks offered are academic, arts and design, sports, and technical-vocational livelihood (TVL). The academic track includes the general academic strand (GAS); the accountancy, business, and management strand (ABM); the humanities and social sciences strand (HUMSS), and the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics strand (STEM). The TVL track offers specializations in automotive servicing; caregiving; and bread, pastry, and culinary arts. Music and sports specializations are also offered.17

MVCA’s enrollment in 2019-2020 of 381 students exceeded the prior year despite the COVID-19 pandemic.18

MVCA continues to enjoy the recognition of both national and international accrediting bodies which commend the school’s pursuit of wholistic excellence in the field of Adventist Christian education.19

Historical Role of the School (in the Church, Community, Nation, and World)

MVCA draws its student body from around the world. The largest number of students are the children of employees of the Central Mindanao Mission (CMAM) and other conferences of the SPUC, as well as the children of MVC faculty members. Employees of the city of Valencia as well as residents of the thirty-one barangays of Valencia City send their children to MVCA. In addition, young people from the different local government units of the province of Bukidnon are attracted to MVCA. A few more enroll from as far away as Europe, Asia, and North America.20

What Remains to be Done to Fulfill Its Mission

Guided by her vision of “a Christ-centered Adventist educational institution leading in instruction, research, and service” and enthused with her mission to “endeavor to educate individuals to seek true knowledge, live learned lives, and share the light”21 MVCA is committed to moving forward with Jesus Christ—the Master Teacher—Who Alone can give true success in the endeavor of preparing God-fearing youth for service in this world and in the world to come.

Set on Buffalo Hill, MVCA stands as a witness of God’s faithfulness and a beacon to all young people.

List of Principals

BSEd Department (1954-1957), J. M. Tawatao (1958-1962), A. B. Gayao (1962-1966), U. M. Oliva (1966-1967), F. B. Castro (1967-1969), G. A. Arafiles (1969-1971), A. T. Nermal (1971-1972), N. N. Macarine (1972-1974), J. D. Dial (1975), R. F. Budayao (1976-1978), E. A. Bingcang (1978-1980), M. E. Bingcang (1980-1982), S. D. Dayahan (acting, 1982-1983), R. F. Sotes (1984-1986), P. T. Donton (1986-1987), A. T. Libato (1987-1988), L. F. Ferrer (1988-1992), N. M. Fernandez (1992-1993), L. F. Ferrer (1993-1997), N. G. Grande (1998), L. M. Dorado (1999-2001), A. H. Rosario (2001-2005), N. M. Canarecio (2006-2014), G. L. Lucagbo (acting, 2015), C. A. Ramos (June 2016-2019), R. D. Selidio (2019-).

Sources

Adventist Accrediting Association (AAA): Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, Colleges, and Universities. Certificate of Accreditation granted to Mountain View College Academy until December 31, 2020. Adventist Accrediting Association, Silver Spring: Maryland, U.S.A., November 9, 2015.

Nelson, Andrew N. “Pioneering a New College in the Philippines.” The Youth’s Instructor, March 17, 1953.

Association of Christian Schools, Colleges and Universities Accrediting Council, Inc. Three-Year Re-Accreditation Status (April 2018-April 2021) to the Junior High School Program. Association of Christian Schools, Colleges and Universities Accrediting Council, Inc., (ACSCU-ACI), May 18, 2018.

“GC, FED Officials Visit MVC.” The Views: Official Organ of Mountain View College, February 1954.

Tanamal, Job Garcia. Mountain View College the Miracle School: An Expanded Edition of MVC: A Pioneer’s Diary. Philippines: n. p., 2013.

Mountain View College, Office of the Registrar, Summary of Enrollment of Mountain View College Academy Academic Year 1954 to 1955. Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College, 2019.

Mountain View College Academy Student Handbook. College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, School Year 2016-2017.

Republic of the Philippines, Department of Justice, Bureau of Immigration. Authority to Accept Foreign Students (AAFS No. JHM-18-T356), granted to Mountain View College, at College Heights, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines. Bureau of Immigration, Department of Justice, Republic of the Philippines, August 6, 2018.

Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education. Government Recognition Number 260, Series of 1956 for the First and Second Years of the Secondary CourseIissued to Mountain View College at Malaybalay, Bukidnon. Manila: Republic of the Philippines, April 28, 1956.

Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education. Government Recognition Number 305, Series of 1958 for the Third and Fourth Years of the Academic Secondary Course issued to Mountain View College. Manila, Republic of the Philippines, June 9, 1958.

Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education, Government Recognition No. 9, s. 1962 for the Fourth Year of the Education Course Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.E.) Issued to Mountain View College at College Heights, Valencia, Bukidnon. Manila: Department of Education, Republic of the Philippines, April 26, 1962.

Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education. Government Permit (Region X) No. 70, s. 2015 for Senior High School Program Issued to Mountain View College Valencia City, Bukidnon. DepEd Region X – Northern Mindanao: Republic of the Philippines, September 15, 2015.

Republic of the Philippines, Region X – Northern Mindanao Department of Education, Government Permit (Region 10) No. 130, s. 2015 granted to Mountain View College to Operate the Senior High School Program. Region X – Northern Mindanao, Department of Education. Fr. Mastersons Ave., Zone I, Upper Bulalang, Cagayan de Oro City: Republic of the Philippines.

Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education. Government Renewal Permit No. JHS P-058, s. 2019 for Junior High School Course Issued to Mountain View College-Annex at Malingon, Bagontaas, Valencia City, Bukidnon. DepEd Region X – Northern Mindanao: Republic of the Philippines.

“Registrar’s Office Summary of Enrollment from 1949 to 1950.” Mindanao Mission Academy Campus, Manticao, Misamis Oriental: Philippine Union College Extension Division, 1949-1950.

Philippine Union Mission. Minutes of the Special Bukidnon Council of Representative Members of the Board of Trustees of Philippine Union College, the Board of Trustees of Philippine Union College in Bukidnon, the North Philippine Union Committee, the South Philippine Union Committee, the Far Eastern Division Committee and Elder A. V. Olson—General Conference Representative. Bukidon, Mindanao, Philippines: Philippine Union Mission, February 27, 1952.

Board of Trustees of Mountain View College. Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, April 21-22, 1952.

Minutes of the Meeting of the South Philippine Union Mission Executive Committee. Gorordo Avenue, Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission, July 16, 1952.

“MVC Academy Opens.” The Views: Official Organ of Mountain View College, July 1954.

The Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP). Level II Re-Accredited Status to the High School Program, granted to Mountain View College at Valencia City, Bukidnon. The Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP), April 24, 2015.

Notes

  1. “Registrar’s Office Summary of Enrollment from 1949 to 1950” (Mindanao Mission Academy Campus, Manticao, Misamis Oriental: Philippine Union College Extension Division, 1949-1950), 2; Mountain View College, Office of the Registrar, Summary of Enrollment of Mountain View College formerly Philippine Union College Extension Division, Philippine Union Junior College, and Oriental Missionary College from Academic Year 1949 to 2019 (Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College, 2019), 1.

  2. “GC, FED Officials Visit MVC,” The Views: Official Organ of Mountain View College, Malaybalay, Bukidnon, February 1954, 1.

  3. Andrew N. Nelson, “Pioneering a New College in the Philippines,” The Youth’s Instructor, March 1953, 17, 13.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Board of Trustees of Oriental Missionary College, January 12-13, 1953), 21, 24, Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists.

  6. Board of Trustees of Mountain View College, April 21-22, 1952, 1-3, Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists.

  7. Andrew N. Nelson, “Pioneering a New College in the Philippines,” The Youth’s Instructor, March 17, 1953, 17; South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, “Minutes of the First Meeting of the Board of Trustees of Mountain View College,” (Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, April 21-22, 1952), 1-3.

  8. Philippine Union Mission, “Minutes of the Special Bukidnon Council of Representative Members of the Board of Trustees of Philippine Union College, the Board of Trustees of Philippine Union College in Bukidnon, the North Philippine Union Committee, the South Philippine Union Committee, the Far Eastern Division Committee and Elder A. V. Olson—General Conference Representative,” Bukidnon, Mindanao, Philippines: Philippine Union Mission, 27 February 27, 1952), 1.

  9. South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, “Minutes of the Meeting of the South Philippine Union Mission Executive Committee,” (Gorordo Avenue, Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission, July 16, 1952), 1; South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, “Minutes of the Board of Trustees of Oriental Missionary College,” (Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, February 22-23, 1953), 25.

  10. South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, “Minutes of the Board of Trustees of Mountain View College,” (Mindanao Mission Academy, Manticao, Misamis Oriental: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, April 13, 1953), 25; Job Garcia Tanamal, Mountain View College the Miracle School: An expanded edition of MVC: A Pioneer’s Diary (Philippines: 2013), 53; South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, “Minutes of the First Meeting of the Board of Trustees of Mountain View College,” (Cebu City: South Philippine Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, 21-22 April 1952), 2.

  11. Mountain View College, Office of the Registrar, Summary of Enrollment of Mountain View College Academy Academic Year 1954 to 1955 (Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College, 2019), 1.

  12. Ibid.

  13. First through fourth year are equivalent to 7th through 10th grades in the United States. “MVC Academy Opens,” The Views: Official Organ of Mountain View College, July 1954, 2.

  14. Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education, Government Recognition Number 260, Series of 1956 for the first and second years of the Secondary Course issued to Mountain View College at Malaybalay, Bukidnon. Manila: Republic of the Philippines, April 28, 1956; Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education, Government Recognition Number 305, Series of 1958 for the third and fourth years of the Academic Secondary Course issued to Mountain View College at College Heights, Malaybalay, Bukidnon. Manila: Republic of the Philippines, 9 June 1958; Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education, Government Permit (Region X) No. 70, s. 2015 for Senior High School Program issued to Mountain View College Valencia City, Bukidnon. DepEd Region X – Northern Mindanao: Republic of the Philippines, 15 September 2015; Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education, Government Renewal Permit No. JHS P-058, s. 2019 for Junior High School Course issued to Mountain View College-Annex at Malingon, Bagontaas, Valencia City, Bukidnon. DepEd Region X – Northern Mindanao: Republic of the Philippines; Republic of the Philippines, Region X – Northern Mindanao Department of Education, Government Permit (Region 10) No. 130, s. 2015 granted to Mountain View College to Operate the Senior High School Program at College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon. Region X – Northern Mindanao, Department of Education. Fr. Mastersons Ave., Zone I, Upper Bulalang, Cagayan de Oro City: Republic of the Philippines, 1; Republic of the Philippines, Department of Justice, Bureau of Immigration, Authority to Accept Foreign Students (AAFS No. JHM-18-T356), granted to Mountain View College, at College Heights, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines. Bureau of Immigration, Department of Justice, Republic of the Philippines, 6 August 2018.

  15. Republic of the Philippines, Department of Education, Government Recognition No. 9, s. 1962 for the fourth year of the education course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.E.) issued to Mountain View College at College Heights, Valencia, Bukidnon. Manila: Department of Education, Republic of the Philippines, 26 April 1962.

  16. Mountain View College Academy Student Handbook (College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, School Year 2016-2017), 5-7.

  17. Republic of the Philippines, Region X – Northern Mindanao Department of Education, Government Permit (Region 10) No. 70, s. 2015 granted to Mountain View College to Operate the Senior High School Program at College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon. Region X – Northern Mindanao, Department of Education. Fr. Mastersons Ave., Zone I, Upper Bulalang, Cagayan de Oro City: Republic of the Philippines, 1; Republic of the Philippines, Region X – Northern Mindanao Department of Education, Government Permit (Region 10) No. 130, s. 2015 granted to Mountain View College to Operate the Senior High School Program at College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon. Region X – Northern Mindanao, Department of Education. Fr. Mastersons Ave., Zone I, Upper Bulalang, Cagayan de Oro City: Republic of the Philippines, 1; Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, Mountain View College Academy Student Handbook (College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, School Year 2016-2017), 9.

  18. Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, Mountain View College Academy Summary of Enrollment for School Year 2019-2020 (College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, School Year 2019-2020), 1.

  19. Republic of the Philippines, Department of Justice, Bureau of Immigration, Authority to Accept Foreign Students (AAFS No. JHM-18-T356), granted to Mountain View College, at College Heights, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines. Bureau of Immigration, Department of Justice, Republic of the Philippines, August 6, 2018; The Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP), Level II Re-Accredited Status to the High School Program, granted to Mountain View College at Valencia City, Bukidnon. The Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP), 24 April 2015; Association of Christian Schools, Colleges and Universities Accrediting Council, Inc., Three-Year Re-Accreditation Status (April 2018-April 2021) to the Junior High School Program, awarded to Mountain View College at Valencia City, Bukidnon. Association of Christian Schools, Colleges and Universities Accrediting Council, Inc., (ACSCU-ACI), 18 May 2018; Adventist Accrediting Association (AAA): Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, Colleges, and Universities, Certificate of Accreditation granted to Mountain View College Academy until December 31, 2020, given to Mountain View College Academy at College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon. Adventist Accrediting Association (AAA): Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, Colleges, and Universities, 12501 Old Columbia Pike, Silver Spring: Maryland, U.S.A., November 9, 2015.

  20. Mountain View College, Office of the Registrar, Summary of Enrollment of Mountain View College formerly Philippine Union College Extension Division, Philippine Union Junior College, and Oriental Missionary College from Academic Year 1949 to 2020 (Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College, 2019).

  21. Mountain View College Academy Student Handbook (College Heights, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Mountain View College of Seventh-day Adventists, Mountain View College Academy, 2016-2017), 11.

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Borja, Ma. Venus F., Benedicto R. Borja. "Mountain View College Academy." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 15, 2021. Accessed January 28, 2023. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7CL3.

Borja, Ma. Venus F., Benedicto R. Borja. "Mountain View College Academy." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 15, 2021. Date of access January 28, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7CL3.

Borja, Ma. Venus F., Benedicto R. Borja (2021, January 15). Mountain View College Academy. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved January 28, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7CL3.