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Adventist Medical Center–Valencia 

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Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (AMCV)

By Benedicto R. Borja, Ma. Venus F. Borja, and Zyntrx Giner

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Benedicto R. Borja, Ph.D. in educational administration (Central Mindanao University, Musuan, Bukidnon, Philippines), is a licensed professional teacher (LPT) and a professor in the School of Theology of Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon. Philippines Borja is an ordained minister born in Pastrana, Leyte. He worked as a district pastor in the Negros Oriental-Siquijor Mission prior to his current teaching assignment in the School of Theology at Mountain View College (MVC). He is married to Maria Venus F. Borja and they have three children.

Ma. Venus F. Borja (nee Fernandez), Ph.D. in nursing (Silliman University located in Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines), is a registered nurse and an assistant professor in the College of Nursing of Ha’il University, Ha’il Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. She is an active member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. Borja has a B.S. in nursing from Mountain View College (MVC), Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Philippines, and an M.S. in medical/surgical nursing from Silliman University, Dumaguete City, Philippines. She had served as nursing theories teacher for 16 years and as a research coordinator in the School of Nursing at Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines. She is married to Benedicto R. Borja and they have three children.

Zyntrx Giner

Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (AMCV, formerly Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic) is a non-stock, non-profit faith-based healthcare facility located at A. Aguilar Street, Poblacion, Valencia City, dedicated to providing optimum quality care to all clients in Valencia City, Bukidnon, and nearby municipalities. It is one of the five medical institutions in Mindanao operated by the South Philippine Union Conference (SPUC). It started as the Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic with sixteen patients in the early 1980s. In 1996, it was renamed Valencia Sanitarium and Hospital. Two years later, it was incorporated and the facility was registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission with the name Valencia Sanitarium and Hospital Foundation, Incorporated. Continued growth and expansion led to the hospital board of trustees changing its name to Adventist Medical Center–Valencia, Incorporated (AMCV) in 2014.

Developments that Led to the Establishment of the Institution

The earliest confirmed presence of Seventh-day Adventist in Mindanao was in 1918 when C. C. Crisler—the division secretary of the Asiatic Division based in Shanghai, China—reported that copies of Philippine Adventist literature were “finding their way to Mindanao.”1

The first Adventist missionaries to set foot in Mindanao were the American missionary couple Dr. Ullysis Carlos (Charles) and Ellen Fattebert. Dr. Fattebert was the superintendent of the Cebuan Mission2 stationed in Argao, Cebu. On February 15, 1914, the Fatteberts visited Mindanao from their mission headquarters on the Visayan Island of Cebu where they pioneered the work among the Cebuano speaking people.3 They visited the cities of Iligan in Lanao Del Norte and Marawi in Lanao Del Sur during the summer months of 1919.4

In July 1919, the Fatteberts returned to Northern Mindanao and opened the Mindanao Mission Station in the municipality of Misamis (now Ozamis City).5 The Fatteberts discovered that in Misamis, a mostly migrant people from the Visayan Islands, were receptive to the Adventist message. A congregation at Cabungaan, Clarin, Misamis Occidental, was officially organized into a church two years later and welcomed into the sisterhood of churches during the general meeting of the newly named East Visayan Mission (previously known as Cebuan Mission) held in Cebu City on August 24-27,1923.6

Migration7 from the Visayan Islands, relentless colporteur work, and aggressive pastoral evangelistic activities immediately followed the initial success of the Fatteberts in Northern Mindanao. From a congregation or two which started to sprout around the Misamis area in 1920, several congregations were added in Buenavista, Agusan del Norte, Camiguin, Sindangan, Dipolog, and Cagayan de Oro in December of 1925.

Encouraged by the rapid growth in Mindanao, the East Visayan Mission, which covered the territory of Mindanao at that time, fielded more evangelistic workers to reach the provinces surrounding Misamis. Under the coordinated leadership of Manuel Kintanar—a native of Argao, Cebu, and one of five youth8 trained by Fattebert—the mission sent Ruperto Somoso to work in Agusan province based in Cabadbaran, Agusan Norte; Mamerto Yorac to the province of Bukidnon based in Malaybalay; Alberto Cabardo to Lanao Province based in Malabang, Lanao Del Sur; and Wenceslao Rodriguez to Zamboanga province based in Zamboanga City.9These vigorous evangelists established churches all over Bukidnon.

Meanwhile, the relocation of Mountain View College in early 1953 to Bukidnon from its temporary shared campus at Mindanao Mission Academy in Manticao, Misamis Oriental, made the presence of Adventism undeniably noticeable in the province of Bukidnon. The growth of membership and the influence of Mountain View College gave birth to many Adventist churches in the area. Although the impact of educational and pastoral undertakings propelled steady growth of church membership and territorial expansion, the addition of a healing ministry was seen as an indispensable tool in reaching people for Christ. The need for an Adventist hospital or clinic to better serve the province of Bukidnon and in particular the fast-growing town of Valencia was apparent, there was simply no plan for it at the time.

However, in the early 1980s, an Adventist couple—Dr. Floro and Mrs. Vicky Gonzales-Casuga—decided to establish a family health facility on their property at the heart of the municipality of Valencia (now Valencia City) called Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic. It accommodated up to sixteen patients. After more than a decade of successful operation, the clinic encountered some financial challenges due to tough medical business competition in the town. Heavily in debt, yet not wanting to lose the clinic into the hands of non-Adventist believers, Vicky Casuga sought the seasoned counsel of Paterno M. Diaz, South Philippine Union Conference president from 1976 to 2000 and chairman of the SPUC executive committee.10

Founding of the Institution

The three-way negotiation between the Casugas—owners of the Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic, the SPUC, and ADRA–Philippines, under the leadership of Lamar Philipps, resulted in the facility being leased to ADRA–Philippines on June 30, 1993.11ADRA–Philippines partnered with the SPUC in developing the clinic. This development also answered the need for a medical institution in which nursing students from Mountain View College (MVC) could gain clinical experience within Region X as mandated by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) of the Philippine government. ADRA-Philippines provided the necessary equipment in order for the clinic to function at its full potential while Mountain View College helped with the operating expense.

The Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic nestled on a 555-square meters lot in the heart of Valencia City. On the lot were two buildings: the12 Casuga residence,13 which was converted into a dormitory, conference hall, and the dietary department, and the clinic, which consisted of all the wards. It had only one office which provided services for billing, cashiering, pharmacy, medical records, and Medicare claims. Another room was solely utilized for the accounting office with one computer—the only computer in the entire clinic. The other officers had to complete their paperwork manually since there was no budget to purchase computers or typewriters. The clinic also owned one vehicle, which served as transport service for patients, purchasing supplies, and for church outreach14 on Sabbath.

Under ADRA–Philippines management, the clinic was opened on October 13, 1993. On the same day, it resumed its medical operation with a twelve-bed capacity offering basic medical services. When Lamar Phillips was re-assigned to Africa as ADRA–Africa director, his supervision over the clinic was given to Gil G. Micua, ADRA–Philippines associate director for Mindanao based in the SPUC office in Cagayan de Oro City.15

Working with Micua were twelve pioneer volunteers who received a monthly stipend of PHP 500.0016 for the entire year of 1993. Exhibiting unrivalled commitment and unsurpassed dedication to serve in an Adventist-operated health institution, the volunteers included Fred S. Valmores, treasurer; Remedios Vitacura-Banquiao, cashier; Nicolas T. Nuñez, assistant administrator, chief nurse, and emergency room head nurse; Rose Mae Vasquez Alboria, staff nurse; Marilou Abella, midwife; Nelson Ambaan, staff Nurse; Nueva Villamor-Roa, resident physician; Daniel Gonzales, janitor; Lylibeth Palma-Halasan, secretary and medical technologist; Venus Nave, chef; Gay Nianga, staff nurse; Gladelyn Paglinawan, staff nurse; Merajen Rosalita, staff nurse; and Henry Jamelarin, ADRA driver and maintenance person who was regularly compensated monthly by ADRA–Philippines.17

Days before the clinic opened, these pioneer volunteers, without supervisors or bosses, worked as carpenters, masons, and plumbers. They hauled construction materials, painted walls and rooms, and cleaned the entire clinic making it cozy and comfortable for the anticipated patients.

Many patients arrived on the day of the inauguration for the free clinic, yet not a single patient was admitted. Dr. Ismael Elarmo Naypa, Jr. and other medical personnel participated in the first free clinic. However, almost a month after its resumption of operation, Dr. Nena Macaya-Visto—an Adventist educator and the wife of Pastor Gonzalo Visto—became the first in-patient when she gave birth to a baby girl in the obstetric ward on November 9, 1993. The first medical case admission was on November 28, 1993, when Lynlee Joy Estore—daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ely Estore—was admitted due to dengue fever.18

The members of the first administration committee were Gil G. Micua, administrator-chairman; Nick T. Nunez, assistant administrator; Lylibeth Palma-Halasan, secretary; and Fred S. Valmores, treasurer.

The first board of trustees, included Paterno M. Diaz, SPUC president and chairman of the board; Ulysses M. Camagay, corporate secretary; Manuel U. Donato, corporate treasurer; Remelito A. Tabingo, MVC president; Enrique Ramas, MVC treasurer; Jonathan F. Navales, MVC legal counsel; Bernabe M. Atiteo, MVC vice president for academic affairs; Lamar Philipps, ADRA–Philippines director; Gil G. Micua, clinic administrator; Fred S. Valmores, clinic treasurer; and Nick T. Nunez, assistant administrator.19

Although the clinic’s opening was successful, on February 1, 1994, ADRA–Philippines was directed by the executive committee of ADRA–Far East to cease its operation of the hospital as it was not a regularly funded project recommended by Adventist Health System–Asia (ASH/A).20 Before the medical facility transitioned to a new management, on March 15, 1994, the board of ADRA–Philippines approved US $10,000 to fund construction of an extension upgrading the clinic to a twenty-four-bed secondary hospital. In addition to funding, a request for volunteers to help construct the clinic extension was also approved.21 As construction was completed and the newly expanded hospital continued to operate, the board of ADRA–Philippines requested on June 8, 1995, that the SPUC assume full management, control, and ownership of the medical facility, an action which was fully realized two years later.22

These events, together with its humble beginnings, laid the foundation of the Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic to become the most recognizable private medical facilities in the province of Bukidnon. It was guided by its mission “extending the healing ministry of Christ through wholistic excellent care” and its relentless pursuit of the vision to be “the healthcare facility of choice and faith-based center of influence in Valencia City, Bukidnon, by the year 2020.”

History of the Institution

Much of Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic’s early success was attributed to the endorsement of Dr. Myra Ann Burdeos-Nacita, a pediatrician, who sent many of her pediatric patients to the clinic.23 In the first five months of operation, the number of patients increased 250 percent and the hospital building could no longer accommodate the number of patients who came for treatment. Spearheaded by Gil G. Micua, ADRA–Philippines, associate director for Mindanao and administrator of the medical facility, the clinic succeeded in getting a loan of PHP 500,000.00 from the South Philippine Union Conference for the construction of a new extension at the back of the clinic building. The loan was released to the clinic at the end of 1994.

When the addition was complete, it was discovered that the lot on which the new building was erected did not belong to the institution. This created a huge challenge because the owner, Farmers’ Cooperative Marketing Association (FACOMA), demanded a PHP 3,000,000.00 payment for the land illegally, albeit mistakenly, occupied, otherwise they would have the new construction demolished. Fortunately, Mountain View College (MVC) came to the rescue. The college was in dire need of a medical institution with which to affiliate in order to provide clinical experience to its nursing students. MVC president Abelardo M. Era successfully negotiated with the FACOMA administrators to purchase the land with a fifty percent less than the original price. MVC paid FACOMA PHP 1,000,000.00 and the remaining PHP 500,000.00 was to be paid by the clinic over the next eighteen months. As the clinic operation progressed, it was able to pay not only its share of the newly secured land, but also refunded MVC for the PHP 1,000,000.00 down payment.24

In 1997, a joint meeting of the South Philippine Union Conference executive committee, the AMCV executive committee, and the AMCV board of trustees voted to transfer the hospital management from ADRA–Philippines to MVC. Dr. Fred L. Webb, an American missionary working at MVC, was given the privilege of overseeing the hospital operation. MVC gave a token amount of PHP 5,000,000.00 to ADRA–Philippines for its initiative and leadership of the medical institution during its founding years, and for providing medical equipment and visionary planning. On December 28, 1998, the medical facility was officially registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as Valencia Sanitarium and Hospital Foundation, Incorporated.25

As AMCV tirelessly pursued its mission, administrators decided to expand the clinic into a medical center. In 2000, the owners of the two adjoining lots decided to sell their lands to the hospital. With financial help from the SPUC (PHP 50,000.00), Southern Asia Pacific Division (PHP 50,000.00), the British Union Conference, US $150,000.00, and Triple A Florida (PHP100,000.00), and a loan of US$150,000.00 from Adventist Health System–Asia (AHS – Asia), the two lots were purchased. They comprised almost 2000-square meters bringing the total land area of the medical facility to 2,400-square meters. Some of the donated money was used in the initial construction of the four-story edifice which today stands at the time of writing.26, 27

As the medical facility gained increasing patronage from across the province of Bukidnon, the need to enlarge the hospital structure required urgent attention. Plans were made to erect a four-story building. On June 7, 2000, the construction of the building started. The construction moved steadily forward as funds became available. In 2007, seven years after the laying of its foundation, the ground and second floors were finished. In 2011, four years later, the third floor was opened for service. On June 14, 2015, the fourth floor was inaugurated with Elder Leonardo R. Asoy, SPUC president, as the keynote speaker. The Honorable Azucena P. Huervas, city mayor of Valencia, and Rufo Gasapo, Southern Asia Pacific Division (SSD) healthcare director, were the guests of honor accompanied by other Adventist hospital presidents and AMCV officers.28

AMCVs steady growth and development from its humble beginnings to a licensed level 2 hospital accredited by both the Department of Health (DOH) and the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC) of the Republic of the Philippines, and recognized as a Center of Quality by the PHIC was a testament to the faith of its administrators and employees. On March 31, 2014, the hospital was officially registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as Adventist Medical Center–Valencia City, Incorporated29 with a 100-bed capacity. The laboratory of the medical center was accredited level 3 by the DOH.30

The services of the Adventist Medical Center-Valencia include the following: 24-Hour Emergency Care; 24-Hour Ambulance Services; 24-Hour Pharmacy; 24-Hour Laboratory & Pathology; Blood Station; Diagnostic Imaging (X-ray, CT Scan, Ultrasound, 2D Echo); Drug Testing; Endoscopy and Colonoscopy; Dialysis Center; Intensive Care Unit (ICU); Mobile X-ray; Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU); Operating Room & Delivery Services; Advanced Wound & Ostomy Management Clinic; Medical services (Anesthesiology, Dental, ENT, Ophthalmology, Family Medicine, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Orthopedics, Pediatrics, Urology); Continuing Professional Development (CPD); Provider - PRC Accredited; Dietary and Health Foods; Health Education: Diabetes & Renal; Pastoral Care.

As a Center of Quality medical institution, AMCV became sought after as an affiliate of higher education institutions with nursing programs and health allied courses in the region. The shift of the Philippine educational system from a four-year to six-year basic secondary education curriculum beginning in 2016 increased the number of affiliations at AMCV for hospital clinical experience and other on-the-job-training provided by the medical institution.

The medical center has also been active in providing free medical services to the community either independently or in cooperation with the city government of Valencia and other local government units in the province of Bukidnon.

Historical Role of the Institution

As reported by the Adventist Archives in 2018, the Adventist Medical Center–Valencia is one of 198 hospitals and sanitariums operated by the Seventh-day Adventist world-wide.31 It is one of the thirty-five hospitals and clinics supervised by the Southern Asia-Pacific Division32 and one of the five hospitals and clinics under the direct supervision of South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.33

Since its founding, AMCV has been aggressive in its pursuit of reaching the population of the City of Valencia particularly and the entire province of Bukidnon generally. The institution has been in the forefront of conducting medical missions which eventually led to the city government making it a partner in delivering medical services both in clinical praxis and theories. Programs have included smoking cessation, drug abuse awareness, and therapeutic counseling for drug addicts spearheaded by the chaplaincy department of the medical institution.

As of 2020, the Professional Regulation Commission of the Republic of the Philippines had recently designated AMCV as a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) provider which entitled the medical institution to conduct and host seminars for all health professionals and other PRC licensed degrees with CPD units.34 As such, the medical institution has been the Province of Bukidnon’s partner in providing continuing professional development to its constituency and the population beyond the province’s borders.

AMCV’s chaplaincy department has been foremost in shaping the spiritual atmosphere of the institution. During Saturdays, medical personnel and student nurses on-duty offer religious songs and give fresh flowers to patients as their way of showing the clients that AMCV cares. During the first quarter of 2020, the chaplaincy department reported that the department’s united efforts led to the baptism of thirty-four individuals who accepted Jesus Christ as their personal Savior. The department has been vigorously engaged both in personal and public evangelism including community chaplaincy which resulted in the number of baptisms earlier mentioned. These activities have been consistently carried out by AMCV since its founding except for the community chaplaincy program, which was implemented in 2019.35

It is very well known that AMCV has become the healthcare facility of choice for the majority of the city’s population and the population beyond the city’s border. In early 2019, AMCV was recognized nationally when it was chosen as one of the seven Armed Forces of the Philippines Affiliated Reserve Unit (AFPARU) non-combatant medical institutions ready to admit soldier-patients in times of emergency.36

In May 2019, a 1,192-square meter parcel of land behind the hospital was offered up for sale. The owner approached AMCV with the first option to purchase the land. Despite three other higher offers, the owner accepted AMCV’s offer.37 On June 18, 2019, the board of trustees approved the purchase of the land for PHP 24,000,000.00 with a 50 percent down payment. The remaining amount was to be paid over 10 months beginning in September 2019.38 Initially, the Central Mindanao Adventist Mission offered to loan AMCV the down payment while the SPUC paid the remaining 50 percent; however, the SPUC paid the entire amount with the understanding that AMCV would repay the money.39 The acquisition of the new lot meant the hospital would continue to expand and meet the medical needs of Valencia City, the municipalities of the entire province of Bukidnon and beyond.

Outlook

Since its founding, AMCV has been true to its mission of “extending the healing ministry of Christ through wholistic excellent care” while it simultaneously seeks to fulfill its vision to be “the healthcare facility of choice and faith-based center of influence in Valencia City, Bukidnon by the year 2020.” On February 28, 2020, the AMCV board of trustees approved the proposed building plan40 for a new addition, increasing its bed capacity as it endeavors to become a tertiary medical facility in the near future. Its steady growth, both in physical structure, and sphere of influence, as well as the tenacious dedication and commitment of its employees, augurs well of the hospital’s future.

Official Names of the Hospital

Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic (1993-1996); Valencia Sanitarium and Hospital Foundation (1997-2013); Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (2014-)

List of Leaders

Administrator: Gil G. Micua (1993-1996)

Presidents: Abelardo M. Era (1994-2001); Dr. Jeremias A. Valleramos (2002); Miriam Ruth D. Dela Calzada, (acting) (2002-2003); Felipe B. Caballero (2003-2006); Miriam Ruth Dela Calzada (2007-2008); Eric H. Barnuevo (2009); Mary Jean P. Loreche, (acting, 2010-2011); Algier C. Ravelo (2011); Edgar Claude A. Nadal (2012); Willie T. Jondonero (2013-2015); Edgardo D. Torniado (2016-2019); Janellie C. Sumatra (February 2019-).

Officer-in-charge: Fred L. Webb (1997-2002)

Medical Directors/Vice President for Medical Affairs: Almer Alfonso (1993); Nehemias Garcia (1994-1995); Ismael E. Naypa, Jr. (1996-1999); Miriam Ruth D. Dela Calzada (2000-2008); Mary Jean P. Loreche (2009-2011); Edgar Claude A. Nadal (2012); Miriam Ruth D. Dela Calzada (2012-2013); Nelson T. Sese, acting (2013); Elvin R. Tecson (2014-2016); Nelson T. Sese, acting (2016-2017); Jesse C. Tabaranza (2017-)

Chief Finance Officer/Vice President for Finance: Fred S. Valmores (1993-2002); Eric H. Barnuevo (2003-2009); Nora S. Ligsay (2010-2011); Nemuel R. Elumba (2012-2015); Gina S. Carmona (2016-)

Sources

ADRA-Philippines Board. Action Number 93-36. June 30, 1993. Silang, Philippines.

ADRA–Far East Executive Committee Meeting. Action Number 94-020. February 1, 1994. Silang, Philippines.

ADRA–Far East Executive Committtee. Action Number 94-23. March 15, 1994. Silang, Philippines.

ADRA–Far East Executive Committee. Action Number 95-57. June 8, 1995. Silang, Philippines.

Adventist Medical Center–Valencia. Adventist Medical Center-Valencia City @TwentyFive. AMCV Compound, Poblacion, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Adventist Medical Center–Valencia, October 2018.

Annual Statistical Report. Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist, 2018. Accessed October 11, 2020. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2018.pdf.

Crisler, C. C. “Changes Among the Moros of Mindanao and Sulu.” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 1 and 15, 1921.

Crisler, C. C. “The Provincial Meeting in Cebu.” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 15, 1923.

Crisler, C. C. “Unentered Regions: Mindanao and Sulu-‘Moroland.’” Asiatic Division Outlook, March 1 and 15, 1918.

Fattebert, Ullysis Charles and Ellen Fattebert. “A New Mission Station in Mindanao.” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 1, 1920.

Finster, L. V. “Philippine Island Mission.” Asiatic Division Mission News, January 1, 1915.

“From Mindanao.” Asiatic Division Outlook, August 15, 1921.

Porter, R. C. “The Philippines.” Asiatic Division Mission News, May 1, 1914.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Accessed October 13, 2020. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. South Philippine Union Conference Centennial Book: 100 years of Adventism in the Philippines 1905-2005. SPUC Compound, Upper Carmen, Cagayan de Oro City: South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005.

South Philippine Union Conference. “SPUC 50th Anniversary and Constituency Meeting.” SPUC Compound, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines: South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, November 18-21, 2015.

Woodword, Nanie L. “Notes from Philippine Union.” Asiatic Divisio Outlook, December 15, 1919.

Notes

  1. C. C. Crisler, “Unentered Regions: Mindanao and Sulu-‘Moroland,’” Asiatic Division Outlook, 1-15 March 1918, 3.

  2. L. V. Finster, “Philippine Island Mission,” Asiatic Division Mission News, January 1, 1915, 6.

  3. R. C. Porter, “The Philippines” Asiatic Division Mission News, May 1, 1914, 2.

  4. Nanie L. Woodword, “Notes from Philippine Union,” Asiatic Division Outlook, December 15, 1919, 8.

  5. Ullysis Charles and Ellen Fattebert, “A New Mission Station in Mindanao,” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 1, 1920, 3.

  6. “From Mindanao,” Asiatic Division Outlook, August 15, 1921, 6; South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, South Philippine Union Conference Centennial Book: 100 years of Adventism in the Philippines 1905-2005 (SPUC Compound, Upper Carmen, Cagayan de Oro City: South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 31.

  7. C. C. Crisler, “Changes Among the Moros of Mindanao and Sulu,” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 1 and 15, 1921, 11.

  8. Charles Nogra, executive secretary of Central Visayan Conference, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Philippines, October 8, 2020.

  9. C. C. Crisler, “The Provincial Meeting in Cebu,” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 15, 1923, 4.

  10. South Philippine Union Conference, “SPUC 50th Anniversary and Constituency Meeting” (SPUC Compound, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines: South Philippine Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, November 18-21, 2015), 15.

  11. ADRA–Philippines Board Meeting, Action Number 93-36, June 30, 1993, Silang, Philippines.

  12. Fred S. Valmores, pioneer treasurer and safety and pollution control officer of Adventist Medical Center-Valencia, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 12, 2020.

  13. The Casuga home was mistakenly built on land which overstepped the property’s boundary with another private property. This would later cause a significant legal and financial entanglement.

  14. Fred S. Valmores, pioneer Treasurer and currently Safety and Pollution Control Officer of Adventist Medical Center–Valencia, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 12, 2020.

  15. Gil G. Micua, pioneer administrator of AMCV and PR officer of Mountain View College, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 11, 2020.

  16. Fred S. Valmores, pioneer treasurer of Adventist Medical Center–Valencia, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 12, 2020.

  17. Ibid.

  18. Nicolas T. Nuñez, pioneer assistant administrator, chief nurse, emergency room head nurse of Adventist Medical Center–Valencia, Messenger interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 12, 2020.

  19. Gil G. Micua, pioneer administrator of AMCV and public relations officer, Mountain View College, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 11, 2020; Nicolas T. Nuñez, pioneer assistant administrator, chief nurse, emergency room head nurse of AMCV, Messenger interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 12, 2020.

  20. ADRA–Far East Executive Committee, Action Number 94-020, February 1, 1994, Silang, Philippines.

  21. ADRA–Far East Executive Committee, Action Number 94-23, March 15, 1994, Silang, Philippines.

  22. Adventist Development & Relief Agency–Far East (ADRA–Far East) of Seventh-day Adventists, “Minutes of ADRA–Far East ExeCom Meeting with Action Number 95-57,” (JP Rizal Street, Sabutan, Silang, Philippines: Adventist Development & Relief Agency-Philippines (ADRA–Far East) of Seventh-day Adventists, 8 June 1995).

  23. Ibid.

  24. Abelardo M. Era, pioneer AMCV president and retired president of Mountain View College, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 09, 2020; Fred S. Valmores, pioneer Treasurer of Adventist Medical Center-Valencia, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 12, 2020.

  25. Certificate of Incorporation of Valencia Sanitarium and Hospital Foundation with SEC Registration Number H199800630, December 28, 1998, Securities and Exchange Commission, Republic of the Philippines SEC Building, EDSA, Mandaluyong City, Metro Manila, Cagayan De Oro Extension Office.

  26. Abelardo M. Era, pioneer AMCV president and retired President of Mountain View College, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines. Telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 09, 2020.

  27. Adventist Medical Center-Valencia, Adventist Medical Center-Valencia City @TwentyFive (AMCV Compound, Poblacion, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines: Adventist Medical Center–Valencia, 2018), 14-16.

  28. Ibid.

  29. Certificate of Incorporation of Adventist Medical Center–Valencia City, Inc., SEC Registration Number H199800630, March 31, 2014, Securities and Exchange Commission, Manila, Republic of the Philippines.

  30. Certificate of Accreditation as Center of Quality with Accreditation No. H10015009, May 1, 2010, Republic of the Philippines, Pasig City, Philippines.

  31. Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist, 2018), accessed October 11, 2020, https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2018.pdf.

  32. See Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Southern Asia-Pacific Division,” accessed October 13, 2020, https://www.adventistyearbook.org/list?type=contained&EntityID=13370&EntityType=M|Medical.

  33. See Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Southern Asia-Pacific Division,” accessed October 13, 2020, https://www.adventistyearbook.org/list?type=contained&EntityID=13370&EntityType=M|Medical.

  34. CPD units are a mandatory requirement of the Philippine government for license issuances and renewals for all PRC-licensed degrees before any professional personnel can practice his/her academic vocation.

  35. Dodskie A. Odtojan, AMCV head chaplain, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 13, 2020.

  36. Janellie C. Sumatra, AMCV president, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 13, 2020.

  37. Janellie Curilan-Sumatra, AMCV president, and Gina S. Carmona, AMCV vice president for finance, telephone interview by the authors, Mountain View College, Mt. Nebo, Valencia City, Bukidnon, Philippines, October 9, 2020.

  38. Board of Trustees, June 18, 2019, 9, Adventist Medical Center-Valencia.

  39. Board of Trustees, July 24, 2019, 12, Adventist Medical Center-Valencia.

  40. Board of Trustees, February 28, 2020, 3, Adventist Medical Center-Valencia.

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Borja, Benedicto R., Ma. Venus F. Borja, Zyntrx Giner. "Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (AMCV)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed October 22, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8CH1.

Borja, Benedicto R., Ma. Venus F. Borja, Zyntrx Giner. "Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (AMCV)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access October 22, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8CH1.

Borja, Benedicto R., Ma. Venus F. Borja, Zyntrx Giner (2021, April 28). Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (AMCV). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved October 22, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8CH1.