Accra City Conference Headquarters

Photo courtesy of Nathan Odonkor.

Accra City Conference

By Nathan Teye Odonkor

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Nathan Teye Odonkor

The Accra City Conference, formerly South Ghana Conference, is in the Southern Ghana Union Conference of the West-Central Africa Division. It was established in 1894, organized in 1933, reorganized in 1987, renamed in 2016, and reorganized in 2017. The territory of the Accra City Conference falls within the Accra Metropolitan Assembly and includes Ledzokuku Krowor Municipal Assembly to the eastern border with Tema Municipal Assembly and to the northern border with Adentan Municipal Assembly; Ga East Municipal Assembly and Ga West Municipal Assembly sharing borders on the north with Eastern Region; and Ga South Municipal Assembly which is bounded on the west by Central Region.1 In 2018, the conference had 28,117 members in 90 churches and 43 companies2 among a population of 3,296,799.3

Pioneering Work

The work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the southern part of Ghana was initiated under the administration of the Ghana Conference, which had its headquarters in Kumase, the capital of Ashanti Region. Pastor David Narh Agboka, a trailblazer of the Accra Ministry Project in 1941, started the church in Accra with 8 baptized members at Mr. Charles Clerk’s house in Osu-Accra.4 In 1959, 18 souls were baptized into the church fellowship. The group of believers rented houses as places of worship until church buildings were established in Accra. The first was on Hansen Road at the Center of Accra, then Labone at the East, Bubiashie at the West, Korle Gonno at the South, and Accra New Town at the north. From these strategic positions, the church expanded in Accra.5

Mission Status

On March 7, 1977, the South Ghana Mission was organized and voted at the executive committee meeting of the Ghana Conference at Kumase. The new field was under the leadership of Pastor Andrew Narh Daitey, with the headquarters in the building of the West Africa Union Mission. In June 1977, the headquarters of the South Ghana Mission was moved to the Labone Church premises.6 The work in Accra grew rapidly due to migration of personnel from all the regions seeking employment in Accra, the national capital.

Conference Status

In June 1987, under the leadership of Pastor Ebow Bonnie, South Ghana Mission attained conference status.7 The territory of the conference then comprised the Central, Eastern, Western, and Volta Regions. In 1995, as the territory grew, the administration created the Western Region as a new field, with the name South-West Ghana Administrative Unit and the headquarters at Takoradi, for an effective ministry.8 The created field developed rapidly, and per that experience, the administration of the South Ghana Conference in 1999 created a new field in the Eastern Region called East Ghana Administrative Unit, with the headquarters at Koforidua.9 In 2015, the entire Central Region was created as a field with the name Mid-South Ghana Administrative Unit, with the headquarters at Cape Coast.10 The creation of these fields enhanced the growth and the development of the church in all these regions: membership increased, churches were planted, the Advent message was spread through these fields in various forms, and administrative measures were effective. In August 2014, the South East Ghana Administrative Unit (now Meridian Ghana Conference) was created by the South Ghana Conference with the headquarters at Tema.11 In 2017, the Volta Region was created and divided into two mission fields: Volta South Ghana Administrative Unit and Volta North Administrative Unit, with the headquarters at Ho and Jasikan, respectively.12

Reorganization

In 2017, after the re-demarcation of the fields, South Ghana Conference was left with a sizeable territory of the Accra Metropolitan Assembly in the Greater Accra Region; therefore, the name of the field was changed to Accra City Conference to officially indicate its geographical representation on the map of Ghana.13 Hence, it can be said that Accra City Conference, formerly South Ghana Conference, was established in 1894,14 organized in 1933, reorganized in 1987, renamed in 2016, and then reorganized and the territory divided in 2017 under the leadership of Pastor S. O. T. Hammond (2017- ), president; Pastor N. T. Odonkor (2017- ), executive secretary, and Elder Charles Anoo Quaye (2017- ), treasurer.15

The Accra City Conference is located at 18 Hansonic Road, New Abossey Okai, Dansoman, Accra, Ghana.16

Sources

Brocke, Eunice Miranda. Adventism in Accra. Accra: Advent Press, 2011.

Minutes of the South Ghana Conference, 2017. Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

Minutes of the South Ghana Conference, September 29, 2016, 4. Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, 1995. Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, 1999. Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, 2015. Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, October 17, 2014. Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research. 2019 Annual Statistical Report: Advance Release of Membership Statistics by Division for 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2019A.pdf.

Owusu-Mensa, Kofi. Seventh-day Adventism in Ghana History. Accra: Advent Press, 2005.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press, 2018 and 2019.

Notes

  1. “Accra City Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press, 2019), 403.

  2. Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research, 2019 Annual Statistical Report: Advance Release of Membership Statistics by Division for 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2019A.pdf, 18.

  3. Population as of June 30, 2018. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Accra City Conference.”

  4. Pastor C. B. Mensah, interview by author, Kumase, March 15, 2003.

  5. Eunice Miranda Brocke, Adventism in Accra (Accra: Advent Press, 2011), 16, 18, 58, 108, 151–152.

  6. Kofi Owusu-Mensa, Seventh-day Adventism in Ghana History (Accra: Advent Press, 2005), 283.

  7. Ibid., 353.

  8. Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, 1995, Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

  9. Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, 1999, Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

  10. Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, 2015, Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

  11. Minutes of the South Ghana Conference Executive Meeting, October 17, 2014, Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

  12. Minutes of the South Ghana Conference, 2017, Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

  13. Minutes of the South Ghana Conference, September 29, 2016, 4, Accra City Conference archives, Accra, Ghana.

  14. Kofi Owusu-Mensa, Seventh-day Adventism in Ghana History (Accra, Advent Press, 201), 11–13, 18–21.

  15. “Accra City Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press, 2018), 397; “Accra City Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press, 2019), 403.

  16. Ibid.

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Odonkor, Nathan Teye. "Accra City Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 15, 2020. Accessed October 21, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8G7N.

Odonkor, Nathan Teye. "Accra City Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. October 15, 2020. Date of access October 21, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8G7N.

Odonkor, Nathan Teye (2020, October 15). Accra City Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved October 21, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8G7N.