South Ecuador Mission

By Cristian Álvarez, Darling Ayala, and Dálcio da Silva Paiva

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Cristian Álvarez

Darling Ayala

Dálcio da Silva Paiva

First Published: December 13, 2021

South Ecuador Mission (Misión Ecuatoriana del Sur or MES) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and is based in the South American Division territory. It is located at 901 Tulcán and Miguel Hurtado St., ZIP code 090310, Guayas district, city of Guayaquil, Ecuador.1

Territory and Statistics

This administrative unit is responsible for the progress of the Gospel preaching in its region, which covers the Azuay, Bolívar, Canar, Chimborazo, El Oro, Galapagos, Guayas, Los Ríos, Manabi, Morona Santiago, Santa Helena, and Zamora Chinchipe districts in southern Ecuador. Its territory covers a total area of 159,949.29 km² and a population of 9,109,007 inhabitants.2 It holds 354 congregations (135 organized churches and 219 groups)3 and 27,641 members, which represents 1 member per 328 inhabitants. An the evangelistic front, the Adventist education network has been present in Ecuador for more than 80 years, with its values based in principles that go beyond academic knowledge while seeking a balanced development of the whole human being in our physical, spiritual, and mental aspects.

In the territory of South Ecuador Mission, there are four educational institutions: Príncipe de Paz Adventist Academy, located at Marta Bucaram St., La República Ave., Las Orquídeas, Guayaquil, Guayas - Ecuador; Pacífico Adventist Academy, located at Marzo and Colombia 6, Guayaquil, Guayas - Ecuador; Miguel de Cervantes Adventist Academy, located at Los Vergeles Mz. 38th SL # 1-2 - Los Vergeles, Guayaquil, Guayas – Ecuador; and Lírio De Los Valles Adventist Academy at the following address: Recinto el Archiote, Vía Mata de Cacao, Fiebre del Cordero, Mata de Cacao, Los Ríos - Ecuador.4

MES uses all means of communication to warn and prepare everyone for the soon return of Jesus. Thus, there is a radio station (Guayaquil New Time Radio) in the same building as the Mission.5 To do the work and fulfil their purpose, the field has 280 active servants and missionaries. Among them, 31 are certified ministers and 16 are licensed ministers. There are also three licensed missionaries and 18 certified canvassers.6

Origin of the Work in the Mission Territory

The beginning of the Adventist work in Ecuador took place on August 30, 1904, with Thomas H. Davis – a self-supporting missionary7 came to Guayaquil through the Christian literature market after being sent by the General Conference (GC).8 At the time, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, and Peru were covered by the West Coast Mission.9 More than a year after Davis’ arrival, Pastor George W. Casebeer from Idaho, U.S.A., arrived on October 5, 1905, through a grant awarded by The Upper Columbia Conference. It was Casebeer10 who, in 1906, organized the Ecuador Mission (ME), the predecessor of the future South Ecuador Mission (MES), and he became its first superintendent.11 Thus, ME was first administered directly by the South American Division.

In the early years, growth of Adventism in Ecuador occurred very slowly due to the remnants of the influence of the new Ecuadorian state12 established through the new constitution (called the “black charter”) and the full support of the Catholic Church 13 towards this project of national reconstruction. Back then, there were only 10 Sabbath keepers and the two workers, Davis and Casebeer.14 In 1910, the Mission and Sabbath School departments were organized and were headed by Mrs. Osborne,15 a licensed missionary and nurse who was working in the country. By 1913, William Steele (1908), William. W. Wheeler (1909-1911), and Santiago Mangold (1912-1913) had also served as superintendents. During the first 24 years of missionary work, only 23 people were baptized in Ecuador.16

In 1911, Ecuador Mission transferred its headquarters to the city of Quito, and between February 12 and 2217, 1914, the South American Union Session took place in Montevideo, Uruguay, where, by GC recommendation, it was decided to appoint C. E. Knight as superintendent pastor and John Osborne as treasurer and secretary of MES.18 In this Session, Ecuador Mission became part of the Inca Union Mission with its headquarters in Peru, and covered Ecuador and Bolivia.19 In addition, the GC voted to offer the U.S. $15,000.00 designated to the organization of the new mission field.20 During the beginning of the 1920s, H. D. Isaac was sent from Washington to be the Ecuadorian superintendent. It was during those years that the first executive board was organized by the Ecuador Mission, and the new position of secretary-treasurer was created. Isaac was also the one who moved the church headquarters to the city of Guayaquil.21

Later, Orley Ford, who soon led the Ecuadorian Mission (1925-1928), chose to move the church headquarters again, this time to the city of Cajabamba, Chimborazo province, where a project among the indigenous people began. It reached more than 20,000 people, one of the most relevant projects to date.22 In the following years, ME HQ changed its address a few more times. In 1931, J. D. Replode decided to move the mission headquarters to Riobamba, and in 1933, Francisco Brouchy – as the new church director in the country – brought it back to Guayaquil. Replode, in its second administrative mandate (1936-1937), moved the headquarters to Quito.23 In 1945, C. E. Fillman definitively established the new publications department. He was replaced subsequently by L. C. Caviness (1946-1948) and I. M. Vacquer, who led the mission from 1948-1949, having in that last year acted for the first time the role of president of ME.24

In 1946, ME was administered by the Inca Union Mission (UI) and only had 4 churches and slightly more than 257 members in the country.25 This was partly due to the war between Peru and Ecuador, which prevented them from having a good administration. Halfway through 1950, Pastor Jorge Rendón arrived in Ecuador to develop an evangelistic ministry – voted by the G.C. Realizing the great possibilities of growth, he organized the radio department to advance the preaching of the Gospel.26 With this missionary expansion in Ecuador, new projects were implemented. Pastor Nathan M. Merkel (1961-1966) – who had been the president of the church in the country – innovated by adding television to the ME Radio Department, and that produced great results.27 In addition, he planted ME´s infrastructure, which was inaugurated on September 8, 1964,28 with the UI and the ME presidents in attendance.29

It was in 1974 that, for the first time in ME history, an Ecuadorian – Pastor Luis Rueda – took over the mission presidency. Another significant event was the 17th Ecuador Mission Congress, which took place from February 1st to 4th, where Pastor Henrique Berg – Inca Union Mission president – presented the official decision to remove ME from UI management and to become a permanent South American Division (SAD) field. Thus, from 1983,30 ME thus started being managed directly by the SAD.31 Later, in 1990, they were allowed to split their field in two local missions.32 In 1993, after carrying out the Extraordinary Congress in Quito,33 MES inherited Ecuador Mission infrastructure,34 meaning MES was responsible for providing the North Ecuador Mission its future headquarters building.35

Mission Organizational History

MES was organized in 1993, and its headquarters has always been located at Guayaquil. Its territory has covered Azuay, Bolívar, Cañar, El Oro, Galápagos, Guayas, Los Ríos, Manabí, Morona Santiago, and Zamora Chinchipe provinces. It was composed of 24 organized churches, 11 ordained ministers, 16 certified missionaries, six evangelists, and 9,770 members out of a population of 5,882,595.36 At the time, Pastor Augusto Rivas was president, with Jorge Jiménez as secretary-treasurer. Thus, the first executive board was created with Josiel Unglaub in the Church and Temperance Ministry, Pastor Rivas in ADRA, Communication, and Education Ministry, Lorenzo Torres in Publications, and Pablo Zavala in the ministerial area.37

Before the first half of 1990, MES accepted the Global Mission challenge. Therefore, it was determined that each district pastor would aim at going to and expanding the work in places where there previously was no Adventist presence,38 then conducting two annual conference cycles.39 The results of this public evangelism were 233 converts in the city of Huaquillas and 30 first fruits in San Miguel de Bolívar.40 From March 31 to April 6, MES carried out an educational improvement seminary for all administrators and teachers of the church educational institutions.41 In 1994, Segundo Peñafiel was elected as MES president. Furthermore, on November 12, Puerto Ayora Church in Galápagos was organized42 as a result of Enrique Saéz and his wife Esmeralda’s efforts.43 Later, the Administrative and Ministerial Department was organized and placed under the responsibility of Pablo Zabala, who carried out the evangelism program “Revive” [Revive] with Pastor Alejandro Bullón.44

Later, the work was expanded into 10 cities – places where there was no Adventist presence yet.45 In May of the same year, Pastor Wolff visited Central and South Guayaquil temples to listen to testimonies of Global Mission achievements. He encouraged church leaders and members to continue with the plan of reaching the unreached.46 In 1996, Adventism arrived in El Desquite and Sucúa through MES.47 After 90 years of preaching, a thousand people were baptized in one year,48 and that’s why the church almost completed its plan of growing 15 percent during that year, thus raising the following challenges: to grow 23 percent (1997), 25 percent (1998), 40 percent (1999), and 43 percent (2000).49 In addition, with the Women’s Ministry (MM) support, during a visit from Vasti de Viana who was SAD women’s ministry director, 60 sisters decided to commit to the mission.50

During that year (1996), the following departments were organized: Family/Stewardship and Youth Ministries, Ariel Tenorio; Health and Temperance, Jorge Jiménez; Sabbath School and Personal Ministries, Daniel de Brun; and Women’s Ministries, Glenda de Jiménez. At that point, MES had 30 organized churches and 12,750 members.51 In 1997 in Portoviejo, the “Proyecto Supermisión 97” [Super mission 97 Project] was implemented with firefighters, police, and Red Cross support for evangelizing the city.52 In 1998, the church worked on Publications and held the third Canvassing School;53 a Women’s Ministries plan to aid the affected by the El Niño was developed;54 Sabbath School training was provided to Galápagos Islands teachers; an Education seminar for Pacific Adventist College (CAP) parents55 and MES teachers was carried out;56 and the first evangelistic campaign in Petuca was conducted, resulting in 15 people being baptized.57

In 2000, the MES entered the Coastal Penitentiary and transformed a cell into an Adventist Church chapel.58 Later, in 2001, Ecuador Union Mission (UE) was organized,59 and MES gave the Ecuador Adventist Higher Technological Institute to UE60. In that same year, Leonel Lozano was elected president and the Third Quadrennial Congress of the MES was held at the Ecuador Adventist College. Therefore, the creation of a database of Adventist professionals and a library in each church was recommended. It was also decided that lay mobilization should increase by 10% annually and emphasis should be given to small groups as a means of reaching and keeping church members.61

In 2004, Freddy Guerrero was chosen as president. By then, the Mission already had CAP and New Time Radio Guayaquil.62 Subsequently, MES chose Gerardo Zambrano as president and organized the Children’s Ministry under Amarilis Cedeño, who also was responsible for the Women’s Ministry.63 Later, in 2006, Evaldino J. Ramos was elected as MES president, and he summoned the IV MES Congress in order to (1) receive the organized churches during the latter period, (2) inform about presidency activities, (3) elect directors of departments and institutions, and (4) consider and study programs that would enable Adventism expansion for the subsequent four years.64

Later, in 2007, MES received training through the Sabbath School world directors.65 At the time, the church in the region consisted of 67 organized churches, 14 ordained ministers, and 37,360 members.66 In the same year, Evaldino Ramos was called to direct the South Peru Union Mission’s Youth Department, and Edmundo Cevallos was appointed as MES president67. Meanwhile, projects promoted by Maranatha Volunteers – that built 18 temples and 5 facilities for schools or for relocating existing ones – concluded.68 At the end of 2008, MES carried out the Youth Camp Vivo por Jesús [Live for Jesus]69, and the Public Affairs and Religious Freedom Department was also organized which, along with the Publications and Communication Department, were managed by Manuel Vinueza. At the end of these administrative periods, MES had 93 organized churches and 21,763 members.70

In 2011, South Ecuador Mission was led by Daniel Garay, who emphasized evangelism, which resulted in the distribution of 60,000 books. Many projects were carried out, such as “There Is Still Hope,” in the city of Manta.71 There was also Mission Caleb project carried out by evangelist Henry Avelino in Isabela Island – a place where there had been no Adventist presence, and soon 18 people were baptized.72 Finally, in 2012, the positions of secretary-treasurer were separated, with Augusto Martínez elected secretary and Cristian Gómez as treasurer. In the same year, the Youth Ministry was also organized, which was administered by Cristina Franco and Flor Sauco.73 Then the evangelism project Impacto MES [MES Impact] was carried out in July, resulting in 507 baptisms.74 In 2013, Samuel Sandoval was MES president, and he organized the Pastoral International Department – with Flor Sauco leading. Later, in 2014, Freddy Guerrero was called to be president, and MES at that point was comprised of 107 organized churches and 28,841 members.75

On October 24, 2017, the IV UE Ordinary Congress was held.76 On this occasion, the following MES administration was appointed, all of which still operates:77 president, Washington Yánez; executive secretary, Lenin Guamán; treasurer, Dionatan Monteiro; Children’s and Teen’s Ministries, Celia Olivo; Communication and Education, Gustavo Cevallos and Dionatan Monteiro; Family and Women’s Ministries, Gustavo Cevallos and Jessenia Viteri; Health Ministry/Ministerial Conference and Stewardship Ministry, Lennin Guáman; Evangelism, Washington Yanez; International Female Pastors, Jessenia Viteri; Public Affairs/Religious Freedom and Publications Ministries, Ignacio Castro and Washington Yáñez; and Youth Ministry, Gustavo Cevallos.78

Currently in MES, there are the following institutions: Nuevo Tiempo Radio, located at Cl. Tulcan 901 y Hurtado, Guayaquil, radio frequency 97.3 FM, with an audience of 4,000,000 and administered by UE directly from Quito; Pacífico Adventist College, located at Cl. Colombia & 6 de March, Guayaquil;79 Educational Home and Health Services, a bookstore that sells an average of 1,500 ACES reviews monthly and also sells to the churches other materials including Sabbath School lessons, devotionals, hymnals, books, Bibles for adults and kids, etc. In the Summer, approximately 242 canvassers sell an average of 34,000 books, 17,800 magazines, and 710 Bibles a year.

Looking back into the past, one can see how much has been done in favor of the Gospel growth in Ecuador, but with the rapid population growth, there is still a lot to be done. Seeking to engage Seventh-day Adventist members in Gospel preaching, many projects have already been developed by MES throughout its history. However, huge challenges must still be overcome so that the Gospel may reach each family. Being a church made up mostly of young people, keeping an eye on conservation becomes necessary so as not to lose focus on the mission. With this objective, South Ecuador Mission works for the fulfillment of the evangelical mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.80

Presidents Chronology81

Presidents: George W. Casebeer (1906-1907); William Steele (1908); William H. Wheeler (1909-19110; Santiago Mangold (1912-1913); C. E. Knight (1914-1916); J. D. Lorenz (1917-1920); Orley Ford (1925-1928); J. D. Reploge (1929-1932); Francisco Brouchy (1933-1935); J. D. Reploge (1936-1937); J. Plenc (1938); B. L. Thompson (1939-1943); C. E. Fillman (1944-1945); L. C. Caviness (1946-1948); I. M. Vacquer (1948-1949); A. M. Tillman (1949-1958); Richard A. Hayden (1959-1960); Nathan M. Merkel (1961-1966); Bert Elkins (1967-1973); Luis Rueda (1974-1977); David C. Taylor (1978); Nicolas de Brun (1980-1884); Gonzalo Monroy (1985-1990); Augusto Rivas (1991-1992); Augusto Rivas (1993); Segundo Peñafiel (1994-2001); Leonel Lozano (2002-2003); Freddy Guerrero (2004); Gerardo Zambrano (2005); Evaldino J. Ramos (2006-2007); Edmundo Cevallos (2008-2012); Samuel Sandoval (2013-2014); Fredys Guerrero (2015-2017); Washington Yánez (2018-current).

Secretaries: George W. Casebeer (1906-1907); William Steele (1908); William H. Wheeler (1909-19110; Santiago Mangold (1912-1913); C. E. Knight (1914-1916); J. D. Lorenz (1917-1920); F. I. Mohr (1921-1928); H. M. Colburn (1921-1936); R. N. Rojas (1937-1939); B. L. Thompson (1940-1943); Jorge Riffel (1944-1945); J. I. Hartman (1946); D. M. Ingersol (1947-1952); M. N. Soto (1953-1955); R. W. Cash (1956-1957); B. W. Steinweg (1958-1961); N. M. Merkel (19620; M. C. Alana (1963-1967); Arturo Gnass (1968-1970); Roberto Rangel (1972-1973); Douglas Ermishar (1974-1977); Manuel Egas (1978-1981); Jorge Rivas (1982-1989); Ruben Arn (1990); Manuel Egas (1991-1992); Jorge Giménez (1993-1999); Patricio Gonzales (2000-2001); Daniel Aragonés (2002); Carlos P. Rambay (2003); Pablo Rivas (2004-2008); Wilmer Sánchez (2008-2010); Cristian Gómez (2011); Augusto Martinez (2012-2015); Fernando Landeta (2016-2017); Lennin Guaman (2018-current).

Treasurers: George W. Casebeer (1906-1907); William Steele (1908); William H. Wheeler (1909-19110; Santiago Mangold (1912-1913); C. E. Knight (1914-1916); J. D. Lorenz (1917-1920); F. I. Mohr (1921-1928); H. M. Colburn (1921-1936); R. N. Rojas (1937-1939); B. L. Thompson (1940-1943); Jorge Riffel (1944-1945); J. I. Hartman (1946); D. M. Ingersol (1947-1952); M. N. Soto (1953-1955); R. W. Cash (1956-1957); B. W. Steinweg (1958-1961); N. M. Merkel (19620; M. C. Alana (1963-1967); Arturo Gnass (1968-1970); Roberto Rangel (1972-1973); Douglas Ermishar (1974-1977); Manuel Egas (1978-1981); Jorge Rivas (1982-1989); Ruben Arn (1990); Manuel Egas (1991-1992); Jorge Giménez (1993-1999); Patricio Gonzales (2000-2001); Daniel Aragonés (2002); Carlos P. Rambay (2003); Pablo Rivas (2004-2008); Pablo Rivas (2008-2010); Cristian Gómez (2011-2013); Jorge Cruz (2014-2016); Dionatan A. Monteiro (2017-current).82

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“Anuncian el nacimiento de una nueva Unión.” [The advent of a new Union is announced.] Revista Adventista, April 2001.

“Aplican una fórmula segura.” [A new formula is applied.] Revista Adventista, January 1997.

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Berg, Henrique, and Augusto Rivas. “Bananas and Chocolate.” Mission 83, no. 1 (January-March 1994).

“Campamento de Jóvenes Vivo por Jesús en la MES.” [Youth Camp Live for Jesus in MES.] Revista Adventista, February 2009.

“Campamento de Jóvenes Vivo por Jesús en la MES.” [Youth Camp Live for Jesus in MES.] Revista Adventista, February 1996.

Christman, Don R. “New Ecuador Mission Office Building.” ARH, 1965.

“Crece Escuela en Galápagos.” [Galapagos School Grows.] Revista Adventista, July 1995.

“Congreso trienal de la Misión Ecuatoriana.” [Triennial Congress of the Ecuadorian Mission.] Revista Adventista, January 2008.

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“Directores mundiales de Escuela Sabática dictan curso de capacitación.” [Sabbath School World Directors Deliver Training Course.] Revista Adventista, May 2007.

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“La MES superó el millar de bautismos” [MES exceeded a thousand baptisms.] Revista Adventista, May 1996.

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Notes

  1. “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, accessed February 12, 2020, http://bit.ly/2wchP93.

  2. “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, accessed February 12, 2020, http://bit.ly/2wchP93.

  3. 2019 Annual Statistical Report, South American Division (cont’d),” Seventh-day Adventist Online Archives, accessed February 2020, http://bit.ly/2SGhYsO.

  4. Educación Adventista – Portal, [Adventist Education Website] “Encuentra una escuela” [Find a school], accessed on February 13, 2020, http://bit.ly/39x5Fpm.

  5. “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 241.

  6. 2019 Annual Statistical Report, Denominational Employees,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Archives, accessed February 13, 2020, http://bit.ly/320WL17.

  7. Thomas. H. Davis, “Ecuador,” ARH, December 1, 1904, 19.

  8. General Conference Committee Minutes, Meeting of Officers of General Conference Committee, January 1905, vote no. 109.

  9. “West Coast Mission, South America,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1906), 85.

  10. “Twenty-Fifth Meeting,” General Conference Bulletin 6, no. 13 (May 28, 1909): 195-196.

  11. Ibid.

  12. The influence of the new Ecuadorian state established through the new constitution, enacted by García Moreno, (called “black charter”), which professed that a citizen is only Ecuadorian when one knows how to read and write, is over 21, is married, and a Roman Catholic. “García’s project rested over a political contradiction, on the one hand, it promoted state modernization and consolidation, stimulated production and commerce, developed science and education; on the other hand, it imposed an exclusionary and repressive reactionary ideology, with the land-based clerical dictatorship”. It was a culminating point of his government that adopted measures that allowed the use of firing and whipping, in addition to other forms of penalization. Enrique Ayala Mora, “Resumen de Historia del Ecuador.” [Ecuador History Summary.] (Quito: Corporación Editora Nacional [National Publishing Corporation], 2008), 29-31.

  13. James White, J. N. Andrews, and Uriah Smith, “Religions Miscellany,” Signs of the Times 1, no. 28 (1875): 223.

  14. “Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences and Missions For the Year Ending December 31, 1906,” Seventh-day Adventist Archives Online, accessed February 2020, http://bit.ly/37nORQp.

  15. “Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 123.

  16. Henrique Berg and Augusto Rivas, “Bananas and Chocolate,” Mission 83, no. 1 (January-March

    1994): 7-8.

  17. F. L. Perry, “Conferencia Unión Sudamericana,” [South American Union Conference] Revista Adventista 14, no. 1 (January 1914): 16.

  18. “Ecos del Campo,” [Echoes of the Field] Revista Adventista 14, April 1914, 9.

  19. E. L. Maxwell, “Inca Union Mission Catechism,” Missions Quarterly 4, no. 11 (September 26, 1914): 11-13.

  20. W. A. Spicer, “The Official Notice,” Missions Quarterly 4, no. 11 (September 26, 1914): 3-4.

  21. “Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 126-127.

  22. H. U. Stevens, “Write Our Names in the Book,” Field Tidings 17, no. 42 (September 9, 1925): 1-2

  23. J. D. Replogle, “Waiting in Ecuador Forests,” Central Union Reaper 6, no. 36 (September 7
    1937): 1.

  24. E. N. Lugenbeal, “News of Progress from the Inca Union,” South American Bulletin 23, no. 2
    (March-April 1948): 4-5.

  25. “Statistical Report of Seventh Day Conference Missions, and Institutions 1946,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Archives accessed January 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2P41v0l .

  26. Paul Wickman, “Multiple Challenge of Radio,” Ministry Magazine 22, no. 6 (June 1949): 23, 25.

  27. “Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1964), 197.

  28. Don R. Christman, “New Ecuador Mission Office Building,” ARH, no. 4 (1965): 15.

  29. Nathan M. Merkel, “Ecuador Inaugura Nuevas Oficinas,” [Ecuador Inaugurates New Offices] Revista Adventista 65, no. 2 (1965): 16.

  30. Henrique Berg, Augusto Rivas, “Bananas and Chocolate,” Mission 83, no. 1 (January-March

    1994): 7-8.

  31. R. Wilfrido Alaña, “Congreso trienal de la Misión Ecuatoriana,” [Triennial Congress of the Ecuadorian Mission] Revista Adventista, April 1984, 19.

  32. South American Division Minutes, 1990, vote no. 194.

  33. Miguel Augusto Rivas, “Nueva Misión,” [New Mission] Revista Adventista (July 1993): 30.

  34. “Attached Fields,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1994), 279.

  35. South American Division Minutes, 1990, vote no. 702.

  36. “Attached Fields,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, 279.

  37. Ibid., 279.

  38. Ricardo Bentancur, “Ecuador,” Revista Adventista (August 1993): 29.

  39. Ibid.

  40. “Misión Ecuatoriana.” [Ecuadorian Mission] Revista Adventista (April 1994): 29.

  41. Héctor Palacios, “Seminario.” [Seminary] Revista Adventista (February 1994): 29.

  42. “Crece Escuela en Galápagos.” [Galapagos School Grows] Revista Adventista, July 1995, 29.

  43. “Ecuador.” Revista Adventista, December 1995, 29.

  44. “Evangelización en Guayaquil.” [Evangelization in Guayaquil] Revista Adventista, March 1995, 29.

  45. “Las 10 prioridades,” [The ten priorities] Revista Adventista - Misión Global - Suplemento especial [Adventist Review - Global Mission - Special Issue] 1995-2000, 30.

  46. “Presidente de la DSA reafirma Misión global,” [SAD President reaffirms Global Mission] Revista Adventista, January 1996, 29.

  47. “Campaña en la MES.” [Campaign in MES] Revista Adventista, February 1996, 29.

  48. “Superan barrera casi centenaria.” [Surpassed an almost centennial barrier] Revista Adventista, April 996, 30.

  49. “La MES superó el millar de bautismos.” [MES exceeded a thousand baptisms] Revista Adventista , May 1996, 29.

  50. “Aplican una fórmula segura.” [A new formula is applied] Revista Adventista, January 1997, 30.

  51. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1997), 268-269.

  52. “Proyecto Supermisión.” [Supermission project] Revista Adventista, April 1998, 30.

  53. “Para fortalecer el ministerio de las publicaciones.” [To strengthen the ministry of publications] Revista Adventista, April 1998, 30.

  54. “Mano a mano para hacer frente al Niño.” [Hand in hand to face al Niño] Revista Adventista, April 1998, 30.

  55. “La escuela llega a los Padres.” [School reaches out to Parents] Revista Adventista, April 1998, 30.

  56. “Renovados para servir mejor.” [Renewed to serve better] La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1998, 29.

  57. “El adventismo causa novedad.” [Adventism causes novelty] Revista Adventista, September 1998, 29.

  58. “Transforman una celda en capilla.” [They transform a cell into a chapel] Revista Adventista, March 2000, 17.

  59. “Anuncian el nacimiento de una nueva Unión.” [The advent of a new Union is announced] Revista Adventista, April 2001, 18.

  60. South American Division Minutes, October 30 - November 7, 2000.

  61. “Congreso de la Misión Ecuatoriana del Sur.” [Congress of the South Ecuador Mission] Revista Adventista, July 2003, 22.

  62. “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2005), 256-257.

  63. Ibid.

  64. 65 “IV Congreso de la Misión Ecuatoriana del Sur de los Adventistas del Séptimo Día.” [IV Congress of the South Ecuador Mission of the SDA] Revista Adventista, September 2006, 23.

  65. 66 “Directores mundiales de Escuela Sabática dictan curso de capacitación.” [Sabbath School World Directors Deliver Training Course] Revista Adventista, May 2007, 17.

  66. 67 “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2008), 267-268.

  67. 68 “Pastor Edmundo Cevallos asume como presidente de la Misión Ecuatoriana del Sur.” [Pastor Edmundo Cevallos takes the position of South Ecuador Mission president] Revista Adventista, January 2008, 18.

  68. 69 “La Misión Ecuatoriana del Sur y su personal trabajan junto con Maranatha.” [The South Ecuador Mission and its staff work together with Maranatha] Revista Adventista, April 2008, 21.

  69. 70 “Campamento de Jóvenes Vivo por Jesús en la MES.” [Youth Camp Live for Jesus in MES] Revista Adventista, February 2009, 20.

  70. “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 275-276.

  71. 72 “Todavía existe esperanza llegó a Manta.” ['There is still hope' arrived in Manta] Revista Adventista, March 2011, 26.

  72. 73 “Misión Caleb: Yo iré a Isabela.” [Caleb Mission: I will go to Isabela] Revista Adventista, August 2011, 21.

  73. 74 “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2013), 277-278.

  74. 75 “Más de 500 bautismos.” [More than 500 baptisms] Revista Adventista, September 2012, 24.

  75. 76 “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2015), 287-288.

  76. 77 “Iglesia Adventista al sur del Ecuador presenta nuevos líderes.” [Adventist Church in southern Ecuador introduces new leaders], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], October 26, 2017, accessed January 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/38HRA8w.

  77. “Iglesia Adventista en Ecuador nombra líderes para el período 2017 – 2022.” [Adventist Church in Ecuador appoints leaders for the period 2017-2022] Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], October 25, 2017, accessed in January 2020, http://bit.ly/2HAfY02.

  78. “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 240-241.

  79. Ibid.

  80. “Iglesia Adventista en Ecuador nombra líderes para el período 2017-2022.” [Adventist Church in Ecuador appoints leaders for the period 2017-2022]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], October 25, 2017, accessed on February 19, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HAfY02.

  81. “South Ecuador Mission”, Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook accessed February 19, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HEhKgM; “Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 96; “South Ecuador Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 240-241. For more detailed information about all presidents, secretaries, and treasurers, see Yearbooks from 1907 to 2018.

  82. More information about MES can be found in their website: http://ue.adventistas.org/mes/ or in the social media – Twitter: @AdventistasMES; YouTube: AdventistasMES, Facebook and Instagram: @adventistasMES.

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Álvarez, Cristian, Darling Ayala, Dálcio da Silva Paiva. "South Ecuador Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. December 13, 2021. Accessed February 09, 2023. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8IHF.

Álvarez, Cristian, Darling Ayala, Dálcio da Silva Paiva. "South Ecuador Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. December 13, 2021. Date of access February 09, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8IHF.

Álvarez, Cristian, Darling Ayala, Dálcio da Silva Paiva (2021, December 13). South Ecuador Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved February 09, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8IHF.