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Africa Herald Publishing House

Photo courtesy of West Kenya Union Conference.

Africa Herald Publishing House

By Godfrey K. Sang, and Stephen K. Sisei

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Godfrey K. Sang is a historical researcher and writer with an interest in Adventist history. He holds a B.A. in History from the University of Eastern Africa Baraton and a number of qualifications from other universities. He is a published author. He is the co-author of the book On the Wings of a Sparrow: How the Seventh-day Adventist Church Came to Western Kenya

Stephen K. Sisei works as an editor for Africa Herald Publishing House. He holds a B.A. in Theology from the University of Eastern Africa Baraton and is currently pursuing an M.A. in Communications at Daystar University.

First Published: March 20, 2021

The Africa Herald Publishing House is a Seventh-day Adventist publishing house based in Kendu Bay on the shores of Lake Victoria in Western Kenya.

Early History

The Africa Herald Publishing House (AHPH) was founded in 1913 shortly after missionary L. E. A. Lane arrived at Gendia. Lane built a small grass-thatched hut in which to house equipment, including one machine for printing and another for binding.1 Type was set by hand, the paper placed, and the pressing done by feet. To help him with the work, Lane hired two men, Harun Kecha and Ezekiel Owano, to help him with the printing work and then trained some ladies to fold paper, which was bound and cut to make books.2 When the pioneer Adventist missionary to Kenya, Arthur A. Carscallen, returned from vacation in the United Kingdom in 1913, he brought with him a tiny platen press and a few pounds of type.3 In 1914, the newly arrived press was set up at Gendia, and Lane brought in more African workers, E. Nyalando and E. Singa, whom he taught to set type.4

The South Kavirondo Press

The printing work was first given the name the South Kavirondo Press, named after the Luo people who were known at that time as the Kavirondo. The first publication to roll off the press was the Sabbath School Lesson Quarterly in the Dholuo language in 1914. One of the first books to be printed was a Luo primer along with a number of publications produced by Carscallen in the Luo language. He also published a monthly paper called Jaote Luo (The Luo Messenger). Later that year, the press produced a Luo hymnbook, translated largely by Carscallen.5 He also produced another paper Mirikizi (The Evangelist) which had a wide circulation—not just among the Adventists, but also members of other denominations.6 The outbreak of World War I badly disrupted the printing work and it was not until publications in more languages—notably Swahili and Luganda—were introduced that it resumed production. Lane ran the press until 1925 when F. H. Thomas took over.

Thomas converted a former cowshed into the new press, enlarging their floor space. Thomas installed a second-hand power press brought from England along with a Davis typecaster. The installation was not without challenges. The equipment was shipped to Mombasa, then moved by railway to Kisumu, and finally by lake steamer to Kendu Bay. The poor handling of the equipment damaged vital parts, forcing Thomas to improvise. But before work began in the new building, the roof of the main church and school building at Gendia collapsed, forcing them to use the press building as the school house. Press work then stopped for six months until a new school building was erected.7 The publishing work proceeded rapidly, and by 1929 they produced literature in at least five languages. Under Thomas, lesson quarterlies were produced in the Swahili, Luganda, and Kisii languages.8

The Advent Press

In 1930, the name was changed to The Advent Press, continuing under Thomas’s leadership. In January 1932, Ronald A. Carey arrived to take over from Thomas.9 Thomas became head of the Kanyadoto Mission. Carey expanded the variety of literature, printed and spearheaded the translation of Ellen G. White’s book The Great Controversy into the Kiswahili language. The production of literature birthed the colporteur ministry and workers were recruited, trained, and deployed to distribute the literature. Carey recruited the first literature evangelist named Yuda Odongo.10 He recruited more from among the Abagusii and Nandi and had them trained in literature evangelism. Along with A. W. Allen, Carey held colporteur institutes in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanganyika. Demand for publications soared.

By 1933, the Advent Press was producing literature in seven languages with an even larger reach in distribution.11 That year, despite the ongoing depression, they sold over 1,000 pieces of literature, while Allen continued to recruit more literature evangelists and he himself canvassed among the Europeans of Kenya.

The books had a major impact on the growth of the young Church, expanding to unentered areas. Ezekiel Kimenjo, a Nandi evangelist with the Africa Inland Mission, moved to South Nyanza at the request of his denomination to try and hinder the rapid growth of Adventism there. In 1928, he met Paul Mboya, who was a leading evangelist at that time. Mboya gave him Adventist literature, and he began to read more about the Sabbath. He eventually became an Adventist and was baptized at Gendia before being sent to join the work started by David Sparrow, a South African settler farmer in northern Nandi.12 Sparrow had already brought to the faith his domestic worker Caleb Kipkessio, and so he sent him along with Kimenjo to Gendia to be trained as literature evangelists. They founded the Kaigat church in 1931, which became the oldest church in the Rift Valley. Kipkessio decided to canvas the Luhya and sold a book to Petero Chetambe, who immediately joined the faith along with five members of his family. The Adventist message was opened to the populous Luhya country thanks to literature produced at the press in Gendia.

Expanding the Products

In 1933, the British and Foreign Bible Society requested the Advent Press to print the book of Genesis in the Luo language.13 By 1934, the publishing ministry had proved quite profitable both financially and through winning souls in the ministry. Carey wrote, “the work has gone forward here with great strides and God has been with us and helped over all our difficulties. The publishing work here is not only one of spreading the Gospel but also of tuition…”14 The major challenge in the work was the low literacy levels among the Africans, which impeded the penetration of literature.

Other than denominational literature, the Advent Press also produced a considerable volume of scholastic books in such subjects as history, geography, reading, grammar, and arithmetic among others. The books were mainly distributed to Adventist schools in the East African Union. It fell on Education Secretary E. R. Warland, also the principal of Kamagambo School, to produce the content and deliver to the press for printing.15 Other missionary societies began buying textbooks produced by the Advent Press to use in their schools. The wider usage of the Kiswahili language reduced the need to produce literature in the vernacular languages of Kenya and Tanganyika. Consequently, the four main languages of production were Kiswahili, Dholuo, Luganda and Ekegusii. The colporteurs always carried books in at least three of the said languages.

By 1935, The Lesson Quarterly was produced in two languages—Dholuo and Kiswahili—with circulation of two thousand pieces each.16 The annual subscription of the Lesson Quarterly was sixty cents (East African Shilling) which was a little over seven pence (pounds sterling). By 1937, Carey had expanded the main printing building with a new structure seventy feet long. Prior to this, the printing establishment consisted of three small buildings. Funds for construction came from the 1937 Missions Extension Fund and contributions from church members. The arch on the entrance of the new building gave it the name “Rainbow House.”17

The Advent Press had seven African workers at this time whose products were sold by hundreds of literature evangelists. They produced at least two new books every year allowing the literature evangelists to return to the same territories with new books. One of the books planned for 1938 was the production of the first edition of The Prophecies of Daniel.18 In 1941, the decision was made to move the East African Union to the Southern Africa Division. As a result, the press fell under the purview of the new division. L. A. Vixie, who was in charge of the colporteur ministry, was active in the recruitment and training of African literature evangelists in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanganyika.19 This helped push even more literature from the press. Carey continued at Gendia until February 1946 when he left for England. He remained there for two years and worked as the circulation manager for the Stanborough Press before returning to East Africa in March 1948.20

On February 22, 1947, R. L. Wangerin and his family arrived at Gendia to take charge of the press.21 The press had been without a manager for a full year. Wangerin served for two years before leaving Gendia to become departmental secretary of Sabbath School and publishing and press relations in the East African Union. The work at Gendia now came under the charge of E. J. Trace. Before coming to Kenya, Trace had been the production manager at the Stanborough Press in Watford, England.22 Trace expanded the printing work at the press, but could not keep up with the requirements of the field.23 He constructed an addition to the building, brought in new equipment, and ensured a steady stream of literature.24

The press at Gendia was now a part of four publishing houses in the Southern Africa Division, the others located at Gitwe in Ruanda-Urundi,25 Malamulo in Nyasaland,26 and Kenilworth in South Africa. The Sentinel Publishing House at Kenilworth, South Africa, was the oldest, founded in 1890, while the Malamulo Press was founded in 1926.27 Due to illness in his family, Trace left Gendia for England on permanent return sailing from Mombasa on February 3, 1953.28

Just before Trace left, Donald K. Short arrived at Gendia and took over the work. Short, who was an American missionary, had worked in the Uganda Mission Field for a number of years.29 In July 1955, Grace Clarke, one of the principal translators of literature into the Swahili and Dholuo languages, died suddenly in Nairobi after a short illness.30 From 1944 until her untimely death, she had been responsible for the translation work at Gendia and had just completed the manuscript of the English-Luo dictionary at the time of her death. She arrived in Kenya in 1921 and much of that time she worked at Gendia where she gained proficiency in the Luo language and translated hundreds of publications. She was laid to rest on the Karura Mission grounds in Nairobi. She was 56 years old.

East Africa Publishing House

In 1956, Short reorganized the publishing house and changed the name to the East Africa Publishing House (EAPH). Writing in the Southern Africa Division Outlook, Short stated that by 1956 the floor space at the Gendia Mission stood at over 4,000 square feet and noted the shortage of equipment preventing them from meeting demand.31 Writing also in the same paper, Lemek Kiboko, head of translation, stated that the books Step to Christ, Daniel and the Revelation, The Great Controversy, Christian Education, Better Living, Coming Kingdom, The End Draws Near, God’s Messenger, and others had already been translated to Kiswahili. Under Short’s administration, the Kiswahili magazine Sikiliza was established and became very popular, running a circulation of 17,000 pieces.

On the other hand, The Great Controversy, His Messenger, The End of the World, and Bible Readings for the Home were translated into the Dholuo language. The Luganda language too had a magazine similar to Sikiliza entitled, Omubaka. The Great Controversy was also been translated to that language.32 In addition to Ekegusii, two new languages were added to the list of vernacular publications. These were Kikuyu and Kalenjin, and translators were recruited to produce the first literature in those languages. They principally produced the Sabbath School Lesson Quarterly. For Tanganyika, there were publications in the Kipare, Kijita, and Kitende (now Kuria) languages. Short also arranged for the press to act as an agent for publications by other Adventist publishing houses abroad. They would import the books, then distribute them through their channels. The principal printing work was done through three presses—the Miehle, the Original Heidelberg, and the Job Press.33

The General Conference appropriated funds for the expansion of the press under the Publishing Rehabilitation Fund. This was able to secure new equipment—three large presses a linotype, folder, and stitcher were installed in addition to a larger power generator. All of these further enhanced the work. The publishing house was now churning out more books, which needed to be pushed to the market. J. N. Hunt, the field secretary, managed a force of eighty-one full-time literature evangelists, who sold 66,423 books between 1955 and 1958.34 In 1957, Ron E. Gardner joined the publishing house as the works superintendent.35

The remarkable growth of the press under D. K. Short did not escape notice. The value of publications rose from Sh. 220,523.12 in the years 1952-1954 to Sh. 420,334.81 in the years 1955-1957.36 All of the eighty-one literature evangelists were African Kenyans with the exception of J. A. Kingsnorth, who was the only full-time European literature evangelist. He took the place left by L. A. Vixie, who had canvassed the Europeans of Kenya for many years. Meanwhile Sikiliza and Omubaka had risen in circulation to over 27,000 per issue, both becoming third in national circulation of all newspapers and magazines in East Africa.37 Literature evangelists were not limited to those available to work full time. The Church mobilized its staff, teachers, nurses, orderlies, clerks, and the laity to sell literature in their spare time. Student colporteurs became an important part of this work, selling literature to fund their education.

In the final years of Short’s administration, new construction expanded the factory floor space from 4,200 square feet to 14,000 square feet. The new building was completed in 1961. In 1960, Short left the EAPH and moved to South Africa where he managed the Sentinel Publishing House. Athol M. Webster took over administration of the EAPH. Under Webster, the Kalenjin version of The Great Controversy was produced. It was entitled Lugeet ne Oo.38

On October 2, 1963, the new facility was officially opened and dedicated at a gala event that was attended by M. E. Lind, then president of the EAU, and veteran missionaries to Kenya including F. G. Thomas, whose father F. H. Thomas was an early manager of the press, among others. C. T. J. Hyde from the Trans-Africa Division was also present. Veteran publishing worker Daudi Jakinda gave the history of the facility. The official opening of the extension was officiated by G. A. Skipper, OBE, who was the Civil Secretary of the Nyanza Region.39

Later in 1963, Webster left, and his assistant R. E. Gardner took his place. Gardener expanded operations making plans for a double work shift to increase production. In 1964, the number of licensed and credentialed literature evangelists’ had dropped to forty-nine, although the sales for 1963 had risen twenty-eight percent to Sh. 284,000 from the previous year.40 Gardner worked closely with Robert J. Wieland who was the publishing secretary of the East Africa Union, and who was himself a published author.41 In 1964, The Southern African Division was renamed the Trans-Africa Division with Robert H. Pierson as president.42 Pierson was a great believer of the published word and made the projection in May 1964 that the Trans-Africa Division required 32,472 literature evangelists.43 At that time, there were only 328 full time colporteurs in the entire division.44

Africa Herald Publishing House

In 1965, the press’s name was changed to Africa Herald Publishing House (AHPH), adopting the motto “Books for the heart of Africa.”45 In 1965, the secretary of the publishing department at the General Conference, George A. Huse, visited Gardner at Kendu Bay to discuss plans to double the output of the facility in order to keep pace with the expanding demand. Gardner left in 1968, and Donald C. Swan, who would be the longest serving manager at the AHPH, began his tenure. Prior to coming to AHPH, Swan worked at the Sentinel Publishing in South Africa. He reorganized the AHPH’s facility, and with new equipment worth $66,000, they were able to quadruple the output. They now had two offset presses, one letter press, and two platen presses for job printing. The works manager was D. A. E. Gramkov. The principal item produced was the adult Sabbath School lesson quarterly printed in the Kalenjin, Kikuyu, Kinyarwanda, Ekegusii, Luganda, Luhya, Dholuo, Lutoro, and Kiswahili languages. The junior quarterly was produced in Kinyarwanda, Dholuo, and Kiswahili.46

Within a few years of installation, it was clear that the equipment was still insufficient for the demand for printed material despite working double shifts. In 1976, more equipment for AHPH in order to meet the ever-increasing demand for literature in the region was the focus of the mission emphasis.47 Again in 1983, the phenomenal growth of the Church in East Africa had increased pressure on the AHPH and the Thirteenth Sabbath Offering for the year was earmarked for the purchase of a brand new Heidelberg printer.48 It was also in this year that Donald Swan left the AHPH. He was replaced by Neal Scott. Prior to coming to Kendu Bay, Scott served as the technical advisor for the Ethiopian Adventist Press in Addis Ababa.49 He managed the AHPH until 1988 when he was replaced by the production manager C. E. Ted Proud, who acted for a year before David L. Vanderwelt took over. Vanderwelt served for three years before leaving in 1991 when Ted Proud took over. Proud served another year before Bent Praestiin arrived from Sweden. Praestiin worked with Tom Sakwa, chief accountant, as well as Charles E. Pifer, who was the production manager.50

By this time, the press’s major publications included the lesson quarterlies as well as the magazines the East African Union Herald and the Eastern Africa Division Outlook.51 The book editor was Laurie Lee Wilson. Other senior staff included Elkana Kerosi, Elijah Okelo, and Enock O. Omosa. Praestiin was the last of the Europeans to run AHPH. He gave way to George Ang’ila in 1996. Ang’ila served until 1999. The treasurer at this time was Brown K. Kitur, who served from 1998 until 2001. In 1999, E. O. Yogo took over from Ang’ila. Yogo did not remain treasurer for long, and Mboya took over from him. He served until 2002 when E. C. Aluoch took over. Aluoch served with I. O. Nyabola as treasurer. The main publications remained the aforementioned lesson quarterlies magazines. The newly organized East-Central Africa Division phased out the EAD Outlook, which ceased production in 2005. In 2008, Joseph O. Ochanda replaced Nyabola as treasurer. Aluoch served until April 2009 when Tanzanian A. A. Eliamani took over. He worked with Joseph O. Ochanda, treasurer, and Stephen K. Sisei, editor.52

The AHPH began re-printing lessons for children including Cornerstone, PowerPoints, Primary, Kindergarten, and Beginners.53 Up until this time, the AHPH remained under the East Africa Union. Upon the re-organization of the EAU in 2013 from which the East Kenya Union and the West Kenya Union were formed, AHPH came under the joint management of the two unions.

Conclusion

Despite its humble beginnings, the AHPH continues to serve the needs of the growing Church in the East Kenya and West Kenya Unions. The total sales as of October 2020 were well over US$688,000 with a work force of thirty-four. Printing is principally done in six languages—English, Kiswahili, Dholuo, Ekegusii, Kalenjin, and Kikuyu. The AHPH produces a variety of products for spiritual nurture and evangelism, which are sold through the Adventist Book Centers as well as by literature evangelists. In fulfillment of its mission, Africa Herald Publishing House supplies its products to the neighboring countries of South Sudan and Uganda. The AHPH participates in mission through other means, including financial support for building churches and placing a global pioneer in an un-entered area of Greater Rift Valley Conference, West Kenya Union.

Managers

L. E. A. Lane (1913-1925), F. H. Thomas (1925-1932), R. A. Carey (1933-1947), R. L. Wangerin (1947-1949), E. J. Trace (1949-1951), D. K. Short (1951-1960), A. M. Webster (1960-1963), R. E. Gardner (1964-1968), D. C. Swan (1968-1983), Neal Scott (1984-1988), C. E. (Ted) Proud (1988-1989, acting), David Vanderwelt (1989-1991), C. E. (Ted) Proud (1991-1992), Bent Praestiin (1993-1995), George Ang’ila (1996-1999), E. O. Yogo (1999), J. T. Mboya (2000-2002), E. C. Aluoch (2003-2009), A. A. Eliamani (2009- ).

Sources

Astleford, D. R. L. “East African Publishing House.” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1964.

Astleford, D. R. L. “More Books Needed.” World Mission Report, April 1976.

Astleford, D. R. L. “Publishing Gains in East Africa.” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, May 15, 1964.

Carey, R. A. “The Advent Press.” The Advent Survey, May 1, 1938.

Carey, R. A. “Gendia, Kenya Colony.” The Advent Press, The Advent Survey, November 1, 1935.

Christian, L. H. “Then and Now in Africa.” The Advent Survey, July 1, 1933.

“From In and Out and Round About.” The Advent Survey, June 1, 1935.

“General News Notes.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, May 1, 1948.

Hanson, E. D. “East African Union.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, January-March 1959.

Hanson, E. D. “Grace Agnes Clarke obituary.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, September 1, 1955.

Hanson, E. D. “Sasa Hivi.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, December 1, 1949.

Maxwell, S. G. “The East African Union.” The Advent Survey, November 1, 1933.

“News Notes.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, March 15, 1947.

“News Notes.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1953.

Okeyo, Isaac. Adventism in Kenya. Unpublished manuscript, 1990.

Pierson, Robert H. “Change of Names for the Division, Now: Trans-Africa Division.” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1964.

Pierson, Robert H. “Why Trans-Africa Needs 32,472 Literature-Evangelists Now.” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, May 15, 1964.

“Publishing Work.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, April 1, 1951.

Read, W. E. “Good-bye to the Homeland.” The Advent Survey, February 1, 1932.

Read, W. E. “With Our Missionaries: An Awakening in Abyssinia.” The Advent Survey, October 1, 1929.

Robinson, Virgil E. Third Angel over Africa. Unpublished manuscript. Helderberg College of Higher Education Library.

Sang, Godfrey K. and Hosea K. Kili. On the Wings of a Sparrow: How the Seventh-day Adventist Church Came to Western Kenya. Nairobi: Gapman Publications, 2016.

Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. 2nd rev. ed. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing, 1996.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1993-2010.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1915-1983.

Short, D. K. “Books for the Heart of Africa.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, September 15, 1956.

Thomas, Russell C. “Sold, Resold, and Sold Again!” Mission [Quarterly], October 1983.

Vixie, L. A. “Colporteur Work in the East African Union.” Southern Africa Division Outlook, December 11, 1944.

Notes

  1. Isaac Okeyo, Adventism in Kenya, unpublished manuscript, 1990. Pastor Okeyo was a pioneer Adventist in Kenya who joined the faith within the first few years of establishment. He witnessed the development of the Church first-hand.

  2. Ibid.

  3. “Africa Herald Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 2nd rev. ed., vol. 1 (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996), 39-40.

  4. Ibid.

  5. “The British East African Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1915), 248.

  6. V. E. Robinson, Third Angel Over Africa, unpublished manuscript, Helderberg College of Higher Education Library.

  7. W. E. Read, “With Our Missionaries: An Awakening in Abyssinia,” The Advent Survey, October 1, 1929, 3.

  8. D. R. L. Astleford, “East African Publishing House,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1964, 3.

  9. W. E. Read, “Good-bye to the Homeland,” The Advent Survey, February 1, 1932, 8.

  10. D. R. L. Astleford, “East African Publishing House,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1964, 3.

  11. L. H. Christian, “Then and Now in Africa,” The Advent Survey, July 1, 1933, 3.

  12. Godfrey K. Sang and Hosea K. Kili, On the Wings of a Sparrow: How the Seventh-day Adventist Church Came to Western Kenya (Nairobi: Gapman Publications, 2016).

  13. S. G. Maxwell, “The East African Union,” The Advent Survey, November 1, 1933, 3.

  14. “From In and Out and Round About,” The Advent Survey, June 1, 1935, 8.

  15. R. A. Carey, “Gendia, Kenya Colony,” The Advent Press, The Advent Survey, November 1, 1935, 5.

  16. Ibid.

  17. R. A. Carey, “The Advent Press,” The Advent Survey, May 1, 1938, 5.

  18. Ibid.

  19. L. A. Vixie, “Colporteur Work in the East African Union,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, December 11, 1944, 2.

  20. “General News Notes,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, May 1, 1948, 8.

  21. “News Notes,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, March 15, 1947, 8.

  22. “Adventist Press,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949), 316

  23. E. D. Hanson, “Sasa Hivi,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, December 1, 1949, 6.

  24. “Publishing Work,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, April 1, 1951, 3.

  25. The country split to form Rwanda and Burundi after independence from Belgium. Gitwe is now in Rwanda.

  26. Now Malawi.

  27. “Africa Herald Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 2nd rev. ed., vol. 1 (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996), 39-40.

  28. “News Notes,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1953, 4.

  29. “Uganda Mission Field,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1952), 176.

  30. E. D. Hanson, “Grace Agnes Clarke obituary,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, September 1, 1955, 7.

  31. D. K. Short, “Books for the Heart of Africa,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, September 15, 1956, 6.

  32. Ibid.

  33. Ibid.

  34. E. D. Hanson, “East African Union,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, January-March 1959, 42.

  35. “From Hither and Yon,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, October 15, 1957, 12.

  36. E. D. Hanson, “East African Union,” Southern Africa Division Outlook, January-March 1959, 43.

  37. Ibid., 43.

  38. Godfrey K. Sang and Hosea K. Kili, On the Wings of a Sparrow: How the Seventh-day Adventist Church came to Western Kenya (Nairobi: Gapman Publications, 2016).

  39. D. R. L. Astleford, “East African Publishing House,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1964, 3.

  40. D. R. L. Astleford, “Publishing Gains in East Africa,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, May 15, 1964, 10.

  41. Wieland proved to be a prolific writer and, while serving as a missionary in Africa, produced a number of titles that were published at the EAPH and the AHPH. Some of his books (also published by others) include: The 1888 Message: An Introduction (1980), Africa’s New Bondage (1982), Will Marriage Work in Today’s World (1983), In Search of the Cross: Learning to Glory in It (1967), Daniel Reveals the Future (1997).

  42. Robert H. Pierson, “Change of Names for the Division, Now: Trans-Africa Division,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, February 15, 1964, 1.

  43. Robert H. Pierson, “Why Trans-Africa Needs 32,472 Literature-Evangelists Now,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, May 15, 1964, 1.

  44. Ibid.

  45. D. R. L. Astleford, “Publishing Gains in East Africa,” Trans-Africa Division Outlook, May 15, 1964, 10.

  46. “Advent Press, The,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1970), 424.

  47. D. R. L. Astleford, “More Books Needed,” World Mission Report, April 1976, 11-13.

  48. Russell C. Thomas, “Sold, Resold, and Sold Again!” Mission [Quarterly], October 1983, 10-11.

  49. “Ethiopian Advent Press,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1983), 526.

  50. “Africa Herald Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1993), 496.

  51. Ibid.

  52. “Africa Herald Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 673.

  53. Ibid.

×

Sang, Godfrey K., Stephen K. Sisei. "Africa Herald Publishing House." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. March 20, 2021. Accessed November 29, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AF7Q.

Sang, Godfrey K., Stephen K. Sisei. "Africa Herald Publishing House." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. March 20, 2021. Date of access November 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AF7Q.

Sang, Godfrey K., Stephen K. Sisei (2021, March 20). Africa Herald Publishing House. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved November 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AF7Q.