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​Addis Alem is a town located in the west Shewa zone of the Oromia region, west of Addis Ababa, central Ethiopia. It has an elevation of about 2,360 meters above sea level and an estimated population of 18,000. Addis Alem is known for the Basilica Church of St Maryam with an adjacent historical museum which burned to the ground in 1997 but has since been rebuilt.

​The Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) is the global humanitarian organization of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Its mission is to work with people who live in poverty and distress to improve their circumstances. ADRA Ethiopia began its operation in Ethiopia in 1982, providing relief assistance for vulnerable people in Ethiopia.

ADRA Uganda is a registered NGO of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. It was registered with the government of Uganda on July 24, 1986, and effectively started working with the communities in 1987. Even though ADRA Uganda is an autonomous national NGO, it is part of the international ADRA network which was established in 1956 by the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists to respond to disaster relief needs and development needs in vulnerable communities and to address the ever-recurrent humanitarian needs at international and local levels.

The first Adventist missionaries arrived in British East Africa in 1906. They primarily focused their work on the African people. The mission work among the European settlers came later, specifically through the period 1911 to 1963.

The outbreak of World War I in 1914 in Europe negatively impacted Adventist missionary activities in British East Africa and specifically South Kavirondo, the birthplace of the Adventist Church in Kenya. Almost as soon as hostilities broke out in Europe, they also began in British East Africa. The British were primarily at war with Germany, and it happened that their colonial holdings in British East Africa (Kenya) and German East Africa (Tanganyika) shared a very long and largely porous border.

​​The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Kenya was preceded by other Christian denominations, which include the Church of Scotland Mission, Church Missionary Society, Africa Inland Mission, and the Roman Catholic Missions. Having been introduced in Kenya for the first time in Nyanza in 1906, it was not until 1933 that Adventism became active in Central Kenya at Karura. The Karura Station first reported to Kisumu, where the headquarters of the East African Union was from 1943 to 1949.1 Later, due to expansion of the work outside Nyanza, the headquarters was relocated to Nairobi in 1950. Nairobi remained the headquarters of the Adventist Church in Kenya until it was reorganized into two unions so that the second union had its headquarters returned to Kisumu.

​Samburu is a semi-arid county in northern Kenya primarily inhabited by the Samburu and Turkana people. The strong Samburu culture presented serious challenges to the spread of the Christian faith with some of the early missionaries making very few converts.

​The Adventist faith first came to Western Kenya through the work of a South African settler farmer named David Sparrow and his wife Sallie who settled among the Nandi people in 1911.

​Idjwi, or Ijwi, is an island in Lake Kivu belonging to the Democratic Republic of Congo in the South Kivu Province, which is part of the territory of the North Eastern Congo Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists.

Adventist Clinic of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, opened in 1993. It is operated under the West Congo Union Mission in the East-Central Africa Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Adventist Dental and Medical Center (formerly Arusha Adventist Dental and Medical Centre) was founded by Tanzania Union in about 1970. It is situated at the foot of Njiro Hill on the outskirts of Arusha City, Tanzania.

The Adventist Clinic of Kinshasa was created in the city of Kinshasa in 1993. It was a health project designed for quality oral care and evangelism.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Kenya operates a number of guest houses, canteens, and a resort. Unlike what is common elsewhere in Kenya, the Adventist hospitality business promotes healthy living through vegetarian cuisines and healthy lifestyles. The main Adventist hospitality facilities are the Adventist LMS Guest House and Conference Center, Watamu Adventist Beach Resort, and Adventist Guest House, Eldoret.

​Following the government restrictions on the activities of Adventists in Nandi, Kenya, between 1932 and 1963, the Adventists there relied on the Missionary Volunteer Societies to make up for the absence of formal Adventist schools in the region.

The university was first established in northern Rwanda in 1978 to serve the Francophone constituency of the then Africa-Indian Ocean Division which included the French-speaking countries of western and central Africa, namely, Zaire, Rwanda, and Burundi, as well as Madagascar, Reunion, Mauritius, and the Seychelles Islands in the Indian Ocean. The university officially opened its doors on October 15, 1984.

Adventist University of Congo (previously Adventist University of West Congo), Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is located on the territory of the West Congo Union Mission in the East-Central Africa Division.

The Adventist University of Goma (Universite Adventiste de Goma or UAGO) is located in Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), in the province of North-Kivu. The “Universite Adventiste de Goma [UAGO]” began in 1999. The University was founded by some lay church members of the Central Kivu Field. In October 06, 2013, the founders gave the management of the University to the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Language of instruction is French.

​The Adventist University of Lukanga, known officially in French as L'Université Adventiste de Lukanga (UNILUK), is an institution of higher education in Butembo, Nord Kivu, the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The mission carried by women in Kenya dates back to when the Adventist church was established in Kenya in 1906. Missionary women performed important ministerial work, which included educating the African women on contemporary aspects of living. They trained the African women on such important issues as home care, general hygiene, child care, home nursing, caregiving for the elderly, among others.

Adventist World Radio entered Tanzania in 1997 when the political climate became favorable for private radio stations. The opportunity had been long awaited and Lameck Mwamukonda, then president of Tanzania Union Mission, spear-headed the establishment of an Adventist World Radio station in the country.