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Map of China Union Mission from 1912 Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook.

From Adventism in China Digital Image Repository. Accessed September 28, 2020. www.adventistminchina.org.

China Union Mission (1901–1912)

By Joshua C. S. Chiu

×

Joshua C. S. Chiu was born in Hong Kong, China. After graduating with a B.Ed. (Hons) from the Open University of Hong Kong and an M.Div. from the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Joshua was first employed as a teacher in a church school of Hong Kong-Macao Conference. Subsequently, he served as an editor and Internet Evangelist in the Chinese Union Mission.

China Mission was the first administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in China. J. N. Anderson was its first superintendent. As the mission expanded, it was reorganized in 1909 as China Union Mission, which was dissolved three years later in 1912, allowing each mission unit to interact directly with the Asiatic Division.

The territory of the China Union Mission was China proper and its dependencies.1 At the end of 1911, there were 12 organized churches and 42 companies with 595 members, together with 76 isolated Sabbathkeepers in a territory with an estimated population of 253 million. There were 10 ordained ministers, 10 licensed ministers, 78 licensed missionaries, and 37 colporteurs.2

Background

Interests to bring the Adventist message to China may be traced back to the 1870s.3 After Abram LaRue began colporteur work in Hong Kong in 1888, S. N. Haskell visited Hong Kong and Shanghai in 1890.4

In a joint meeting of the General Conference Committee and the Foreign Mission Board in 1898, it was decided to open up the work in China.5 Donations for the China Mission began to flow in.6 About this time a Chinese convert, Chan Joe-fat, from Portland, Oregon, decided to return to Taishan (Sun Ling) to share his newfound faith.7 During the next few years, as more money continued to flow in to fund the project, the Foreign Mission Board had difficulties in finding suitably qualified individuals to take on the China mission work.8

China Mission

During the General Conference Session on April 19, 1901, Jacob N. and Emma Anderson, a young couple from Wisconsin, were invited to be the first officially commissioned missionaries to China.9 At a meeting of the Foreign Mission Board on October 29, J. N. Anderson was also appointed superintendent of the newly organized China Mission.10 Thus, 1901 is often regarded as the year that China Mission was formed. Ida Thompson, a sister of Mrs. Emma Anderson who was originally planning to go to Brazil,11 was reassigned to accompany them to China.12 The Wisconsin Conference pledged to support financially Ida Thompson’s missionary endeavor.

On January 4, 1902, Jacob and Emma Anderson, together with their four-year-old son and Ida Thompson left San Francisco for China, arriving at Hong Kong on February 2.13 One month later on March 1, 1902, Jacob conducted the first baptism in China consisting of six British sailors and an elderly man, the result of Abram LaRue’s evangelistic effort.14 Later two Chinese nationals accepted the Adventist faith and joined the evangelistic team.15 Thus, the China Mission was officially formed, and its official address was listed at 3 Arsenal Street, Hong Kong, where Abram La Rue had been living since his arrival there.16

Eric Pilquist and wife Ida, who was working for the British and Foreign Bible Society in Xinyangqiao (信陽橋, Sin Iang Cheo), Henan (Honan) at the time,17 had expressed the desire to join the Adventist missionary team in China,18 and wrote a letter to Jacob Anderson to arrange a meeting in Shanghai in April 1902.19 The Pilquist’s were eventually released by the Bible Society20 and were able to officially become part of the Seventh-day Adventist missionary work force in China.21

Edwin and Susan Wilbur were the second missionary couple to be sent to China. They arrived in Hong Kong on October 3122 and became the first Adventist missionaries to base their work in China proper, in the city of Guangzhou, because Hong Kong, where the Anderson’s were, was a British Colony.23 In November, with funds donated by some Chinese businessmen, Ida Thompson opened a Christian school in Hong Kong with 12 students, 5 of which joined the Sabbath-school.24 At the end of 1902 in Hong Kong, there were 7 members in one company and 16 members in two Sabbath-schools.25 In Taishan, 3 or 4 were in Chan Joe-fat’s group.26

During February 1903, Jacob Anderson visited Xinyangqiao, Henan, where he baptized six new Chinese converts on February 14. All were the result of Pilquits’ effort. The first Adventist church in China mainland was formally organized on February 15. At about the same time, a small boys’ school was opened in Henan.27 On April 26 Abram La Rue passed away and was buried in Hong Kong.28 After that the Anderson’s moved to Guangzhou.29

The work in Henan continued to grow. Eric Pilquist wrote to the Foreign Mission Board, mentioning the need for a missionary doctor and printing facilities.30 As a result, four doctors, Drs. A. C. and Bertha L. Selmon and H. W. and Maud T. Miller, as well as two nurses, Carrie Erickson and Charlotte Simpson, were sent to Henan.31 Furthermore, Harry Miller brought a Washington hand press with him.32 In summer 1903, four missionary stations were opened in Henan.33 Xincai (新蔡, Sin-Tsai) became the mission headquarters for Central China where the six new missionaries were located.34 On November 14 Eric Pilquist was ordained.35 By the end of 1903, there were four ordained ministers in China.36

On August 1 Ida Thompson’s boy’s school in Hong Kong was closed due to her illness.37 But she opened a girls’ school in Guangzhou the next year on March 17, 1904, which later became known as the Bethel Girls’ School.38 Edwin and Susan Wilbur, who were relocated to Guangzhou, opened a boys’ school on August 11.39 It later became known as the Yizi Boy’s School. From that point onwards, the new address for China Mission was listed as in Guangzhou.40

In August 1904, Guo Ziying (郭子穎, Keh Nga Pit or Kay Nga Pit), an ordained Chinese preacher from Xiamen (Amon) of another denomination began to keep the Sabbath due to the influence of Timothy Tay, one of his students from Sumatra.41 It led to the opening of work in South Fujian with a central station at Gulangyu (Kulangsu), an island off Xiamen led by the W. C. Hankins and B. L. Anderson’s.42 It also led to the starting of Sabbath services, led by Hong Zijie (洪杰, Ang Tsu Kiet), in Chaozhou (潮州, Chiu Chow).43 Guo Ziying became the first native Chinese Adventist minister to be ordained in 1906.44

On March 14, 1905, tragically Dr. Maude A. Miller passed away due to illness.45 In June the first Chinese paper, Fuh-In-Hsuen-Pao (Gospel Herald), was printed by the Seventh-day Adventist Mission Press at Shangcai Hsien, Henan.46 The printing press was relocated to Xinyangqiao one year later.47

In the next few years from 1906 to 1909, under the leadership of missionary couples Dr. Liu Jian (劉儉, Law Keem)’s, Percival J. Laird’s, John P. Anderson (single at the time), and E. H. Wilbur’s, new works were opened in Foshan (佛山, Fat Shan), Changsha, Hakkas, and Jiangmen (江門, Kongmoon).48 In 1907 19 workers gathered for a workers meeting in Shanghai on February 10-20:49

In 1908 the headquarters of China Mission was relocated to Shanghai.50 H. H. Winlow came to China as the secretary-treasurer51 and B. A. Roberts of the Pacific Press joined the publishing work in China.52 Harry Miller rented a building for the publishing press from Clarlie Soong, father-in-law of H. H. Kung, Sun Yat-sen, and Chiang Kai-shek.53 From August 1, 1908, the Chinese paper, Fuh-In-Hsuen-Pao (Gospel Herald) was printed in Shanghai.54 A cottage was built at Mogan Shan (莫干山, Moh Kan Shan), west of Shanghai, as treatment-rooms for the sick workers.55 By the end of 1908, there were 126 members in five churches, 6 ordained ministers, 3 licensed ministers, 23 licensed missionaries, and 30 colporteurs in the China Mission.56

The China Union Mission

In January 1909, as I. H. Evans, treasurer of the General Conference, visited the missionaries of China,57 a meeting was held in Shanghai. It was decided to subdivide the territory of the China Mission into ten mission fields each with its own superintendents and advisory committees. J. N. Anderson was elected as assistant superintendent of both the China Mission and the Eastern Mission Field and H. H. Winslow as the secretary-treasurer. It was also decided to send out at least forty families with enough doctors to locate at least one in each field during 1909 and 1910.58 In reality, only nine families arrived in 1909.59

A few months later, it was further recommended to constitute the Chinese territory as a union mission that comprises 10 mission fields:60

  1. North China Mission (Zhili, Shanxi, and Shandong);

  2. Northwest China Mission (Shaanxi and Gansu);

  3. West China Mission (Sichuen, Yunnan, and Guizhou);

  4. South China Mission (Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian);

  5. Central China Mission (Henan, Hubei, Hunan, and Jiangxi);

  6. East China Mission (Jiangsu, Zhejiang, and Anhui);

  7. Manchuria mission;

  8. Mongolia mission;

  9. Turkestan mission; and

  10. Tibet mission.

At about the same time that the Asiatic Division was formed at the 1909 General Conference meeting, I. H. Evans was elected vice-president for the division. The newly organized China Union Mission was placed under that division.61

In the same year, the family of J. N. Anderson, Ida Thompson, A. C. Selmon, Esta Miller, and O. J. Gibson returned to the United States for a short period. Anderson and Selmon were delegates to the General Conference.62 J. P. Anderson relocated to Huizhou (Wai Chow Fu) to lead the new work of the Hakka region.63 F. A. Allum was called to help a new group of Adventist converts led by Han Chongzhen (韓崇真), a pastor of the China Christian Independent Church (中國耶穌教自立會).64 B. L. Anderson opened a boarding boys' school at Gulangyu.65

In December, 1909, Elder W. A. Westworth was appointed superintendent of the new China Union Mission.66 In 1909 Fuh-In-Hsuen-Pao was renamed Shi-Chao-Yueh Pao (The Signs of the Times),67 which was printed in Mandarin and Wenli.68 On December 27 the office, type-room, and pressroom of the Chinese press in the building rented from Chalie Soong was destroyed by fire. The English type was saved, but the Chinese type was lost.69 Within a month the new type was bought, and the operation of the press resumed with a Chinese New Year’s special issue of Shi-Chao-Yueh Pao. The press then prepared to move to a new building at their own property.70

In February 1910 O. J. Fish found that Jiaxing (嘉興, Kashing) and Zhejiang have great potential for their work. The Fish’s relocated there with Mrs. B. Miller.71 However, only several weeks later, O. J. Fisher left the field due to illness. Li Fakong joined Mrs. B. Miller’s work. Due to the problem of the dialect, they relocated back to Shanghai.72 In June 1910 the Nanyang Industrial Exposition was held in Nanjing (Nanking). This was the first great industrial exhibition organized in China. Taking advantage of this event, 22,000 copies of a special edition of the Shi-Chao-Yueh Pao were printed and sold. A mission compound was rented in Nanjing led by E. Pilquist and F. A. Allum generating great interest.73 After the two-month’s work, five persons decided to join the church.74

In 1910 the China Union Training School was founded in Zhoujiakou (Chowkiakow), Henan.75 At about this time, August H. Bach started work in Beihai (Pakhoi);76 F. A. Allum and Esta Miller started work at Hankou opening three companies;77 and Law Keem organized a church with 12 members in Foshan.78 In the summer J. N. Anderson had to return to Wisconsin due to the health condition of his wife.79 In the fall, Ida Thompson brought her sister Gertrude Thompson with her to Guangzhou.80

During 1910 there were only five missions operating in the China Union: East China Mission, North Central China Mission, South Central China Mission, South China Mission, and Southeast China Mission.81 The territory of the North China Mission and the West China Mission had not yet been entered. All the mission fields of Northwest China, Manchuria, Xinjian (Chinese Turkestan), and Tibet were not yet actually organized.82

In the spring of 1912, Hong Zijie was ordained to the gospel ministry83 and later became the treasurer.84 He was the second Chinese native minister to be ordained. In the same year, S. A. Nagel and Ida and Gertrude Thompson went to Hong Kong to reopen the work there.85 However, Gertrude passed away on August 8 due to malaria and typhoid.86 Before she died, the sisters took in about seven hundred yearly subscriptions of Signs of the Times in Hong Kong.87 Due to their efforts, six persons were baptized on August 25.88 There was a Sabbath School with 35 members.89 During the summer the China Union Training School moved to Nanjing.90

At a joint meeting of the Asiatic Division and China Union Mission Committees held on November 10-15, 1912, I. H. Evans suggested to dissolve the China Union Mission and make each of the missions self-governing, to stand on the same basis and relation to the Asiatic Division as Japan Mission and Korea Mission.91 Thus, there was no union level entity between the Asiatic Division and the missions in China since 191392 until the reorganization of the Asiatic Division in 1915.93

List of Chief Officers

China Mission (1901-1909)
Superintendent: J. N. Anderson (1901-1909)
Secretary-Treasurer: Mrs. Emma T. Anderson (1905-1908), H. H. Winslow (1908, 1909)

China Union Mission (1909-1912)
Superintendent: W. A. Westworth (1909-1911), I. H. Evans (1911, 1912)
Assistant Superintendent: J. N. Anderson (1909, 1910), A. C. Selmon (1911, 1912)
Secretary-Treasurer: H. H. Winslow (1909, 1910), T. F. Culhane (1910, 1911)
Secretary: W. E. Gills (1911, 1912)
Treasurer: C. N. Woodward (1911, 1912)

Sources

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Anderson, J. N. “An Aged Pioneer Fallen.” ARH, July 7, 1903.

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_____ “Pakhoi, China.” ARH, August 11, 1910.

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_____ “Our Work in China: A Humble Pioneer.” The Signs of the Times, June 5, 1907.

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“Another City Center.” ARH, February 2, 1911.

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Contrell, R. F. “East China Mission.” ARH, October 20, 1910.

Edward, W. H. “Receipts of the Foreign Mission Treasurer for Quarter Ending March 31, 1898.” The Missionary Magazine, May 1898.

“Emma A. Perrine, Percival J. Laird…” The Workers’ Bulletin, October 9, 1906.

“Encouraging Word from China.” Union Conference Record, November 28, 1910.

Evans, I. H. “Letter from Elder I. V. Evans.” Lake Union Herald, May 24, 1911.

_____ “Meetings in South China.” ARH, June 13, 1912.

_____ “The Shanghai Meeting.” ARH, March 18, 1909.

Fisher, O. J. “Chekiang Province, China.” ARH, August 18, 1910.

“Field Notes.” ARH, September 16, 1902.

“Field Notes,” ARH, February 25, 1904.

“From Brother B. A. Roberts…” Signs of the Time, June 14, 1910.

“From San Francisco…” ARH, September 22, 1910.

Gates, E. H. “China.” ARH, July 25, 1907.

General Conference Session Recording Secretary Minutes, General Conference Archive. Accessed March 10, 2020. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCSM/1901/GCRS19010419.pdf.

Grundset, O. J. “South China Mission.” The Youth’s Instructor, June 10, 1913.

Hall, O. A. “Opening of the Training School.” News Letter for the Asiatic, November 1, 1912.

Haskell, S. N. “From India to Japan.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 15, 1890.

_____ “In Australia Again.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, September 1, 1890.

Hankins, W. C. “Amoy, China.” The Workers’ Bulletin, December 19, 1905.

_____ “China.” ARH, August 23, 1906.

_____ “Entering Amoy, China.” ARH, August 31, 1905.

“Heart Thinking.” ARH, May 16, 1878.

Hong, Zijie洪子杰 (T. K. Ang). “Say a Few Word About the Process of How I Believe and Work”「說幾句我信道和工作的經過」. Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》, January 15 and February 1, 1936.

Houser, Estella. “Mission Notes.” The New York Indicator, July 15, 1903.

Howell, Emma E. The Great Advent Movement, revised. Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Assn., 1941.

“In the Asiatic Division.” ARH, June 16, 1909.

Joint Meeting of the Asiatic Division and China Union Mission Committee. November 10, 1912. Folder Asiatic Division & East China Mission Committee Minutes 1912. General Conference Archive., Silver Spring, Maryland, United States.

Joint Meeting of the General Conference Committee and Foreign Mission Board, General Conference Archive. Accessed March 10, 2020. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/FMBM/FMBM18970316.pdf.

Keen, M. E. “Mable Gertrude Thompson Obituary.” ARH, February 13, 1913.

Miller, Bothilde Mrs.米純貞. “After Coming to China”「到了中國以後」. Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》, February 15, 1936.

Miller, H. W. “China Union Training School.” The Signs of the Times, Melbourne, Victoria, May 15, 1911.

_____ “Life of A. H. Bach.” The Columbia Union Visitor, February 12, 1913.

_____ “Shang Tsai Hsien, Honan, China.” The Welcome Visitor, September 13, 1905.

_____ “Story of the China Mission Printing-Press.” ARH, January 11, 1906.

Mission Board. “Our Inland Chinese Mission.” The Workers’ Bulletin, October 20, 1903.

Moon, Allen. “Our Present Duty.” The Missionary Magazine, May 1898.

Munson, R. W. “Good News from China.” Union Conference Record, November 15, 1904.

Nagel, S. A. “Hongkong, China.” ARH, February January 30, 1913.

Laird, Emma A. “Changsha, Hunan, China…” The Workers’ Bulletin, January 29, 1907.

Law, Keem. “An Appeal from Heathen China.” The Life Boat, September 1910.

_____ “Fat Shan, China.” ARH, December 8, 1910.

_____ “Fat Shan, China.” Pacific Union Recorder, December 19, 1907.

Loasby, F. H. “The Advent Message in the Far East China.” The Youth’s Instructor, April 4, 1911.

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“Off for the Heart of China.” The Life Boat, November 1903.

“On account of the condition of his wife…” ARH, August 4, 1910.

Onsager, Lawrence W. “On Fire for China, the Story of Erik Pilquist, Pioneer Adventist Missionary to China,” Association of Seventh-day Adventist Historians, accessed March 10, 2020, http://www.sdahistorians.org/conference-papers.html.

“Our Work in China.” The Signs of the Times, August 31, 1904.

Palmer, E. R. “Periodical Sales in China.” ARH, September 1, 1910.

Pilquist, E. “A Letter from Honan, China.” ARH, July 21, 1903.

_____ “A Voice from Honan, China.” ARH, December 16, 1902.

_____ “The Outlook in China.” The Welcome Visitor, September 9, 1903.

Rogers, H. E. compiled. Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions, and Institutions: Forty-ninth Annual Statistical Report Year Ending December 31, 1911. Takoma Park Station, Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911.

_____. Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions, and Institutions: For the Year Ending December 31, 1908. Takoma Park Station, Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1908.

Schwarz, R. W. Light Bearers to the Remnant. Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1979.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1904, 1905, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1913, 1915.

Shreye, W. S. and S. D. Hartwell. “Wisconsin Conference and Camp-meeting.” ARH, July 16, 1901.

Spicer, W. A. “A New Agency in China.” ARH, August 3, 1905.

Stafford, F. E. “A Visit to Nanking, the Ancient Capital of China.” Signs of the Times, August 30, 1910.

Statistical Report of Conferences and Missions for the Year Ending December 31, 1902. Accessed March 11, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1902.pdf.

Sun, Congguang孫從光. "The reality of attending school in the first school of the Adventist Church in China"「在中華本會第一所學校裡讀書的狀況」, Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》. January 15 and February 1, 1936.

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Westrup, John J. “China.” ARH, October 18,1906.

Westworth, W. A. “China.” ARH, August 25, 1910.

_____ “In Northern China.” March 9, 1911.

Wilbur, Edwin H. “A Word from E. H. Wilbur.” The Workers’ Bulletin, November 26, 1907.

_____ “Canton, China.” ARH, July 27, 1911.

_____ “China,” ARH, December 8,1904.

_____ “China,” ARH, January 2, 1908.

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_____ “The Boys’ School, Canton, China.” ARH, March 23, 1905.

Notes

  1. “China Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1912), 148.

  2. H. E. Rogers compiled, Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions, and Institutions: Forty-ninth Annual Statistical Report Year Ending December 31, 1911 (Takoma Park Station, Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911), 8.

  3. “Heart Thinking,” The Review and Herald, May 16, 1878, 155.

  4. S. N. Haskell, “From India to Japan,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 15, 1890, 249; Haskell, “In Australia Again,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, September 1, 1890.

  5. Joint Meeting of the General Conference Committee and Foreign Mission Board, March 31, 1898, 74, General Conference Archive, accessed March 10, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/FMBM/FMBM18970316.pdf; Allen Moon, “Our Present Duty,” The Missionary Magazine, May 1898, 153, 154.

  6. W. H. Edward, “Receipts of the Foreign Mission Treasurer for Quarter Ending March 31, 1898,” The Missionary Magazine, May 1898, 187-190.

  7. Mrs. J. N. Anderson, “Our Work in China,” ARH, February 10, 1903, 11.

  8. The Board of Trustees of the Foreign Mission Board, December 14, 15, 1899, 201-203; May 7, 1900, 243-244, General Conference Archive, accessed March 10, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/FMBM/FMBM18970316.pdf

  9. General Conference Session Recording Secretary Minutes, April 19, 1901, 29, General Conference Archive, accessed March 10, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCSM/1901/GCRS19010419.pdf.

  10. The Foreign Mission Board, October 29, 1901, 5, General Conference Archive, accessed March 10, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/FMBM/FMBM19010424.pdf..

  11. W. S. Shreye, and S. D. Hartwell, “Wisconsin Conference and Camp-meeting,” ARH, July 16, 1901, 462 (12).

  12. Emma E. Howell, The Great Advent Movement, revised (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Assn., 1941), 212.

  13. “Brother and Sister J. N. Anderson…,” ARH, January 7, 1902, 16; Mrs. Anderson, “Our Work in China: A Humble Pioneer,” The Signs of the Times, June 5, 1907, 12.

  14. J. N. Anderson, “First Baptism in China,” The Missionary Magazine, May 1902, 198.

  15. “Field Notes,” ARH, September 16, 1902, 19.

  16. J. N. Anderson, “China,” ARH, May 6, 1902, 19; “China Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1904), 73.

  17. J. N. Anderson, “Our Work in Central China,” ARH, July 14, 1903, 16; Pilquist, “A Voice from Honan, China,” ARH, December 16, 1902, 15.

  18. Onsager, Lawrence W. “On Fire for China, the Story of Erik Pilquist, Pioneer Adventist Missionary to China,” Association of Seventh-day Adventist Historians, accessed March 10, 2020, http://www.sdahistorians.org/conference-papers.html.

  19. J. N. Anderson, “China;” The Foreign Mission Board, May 15, 1902, 67, General Conference Archive, accessed March 10, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/FMBM/FMBM19010424.pdf.

  20. Pilquist, “A Voice from Honan, China;” W. A. Spicer, “Hymns of Zion in a Strange Land,” ARH, December 23, 1902, 5.

  21. Onsager, Lawrence W. “On Fire for China, the Story of Erik Pilquist, Pioneer Adventist Missionary to China,” Association of Seventh-day Adventist Historians, accessed March 10, 2020, http://www.sdahistorians.org/conference-papers.html.

  22. E. H. Wilbur, “In China,” The Worker’s Bulletin, December 9, 1902, 90.

  23. Wilbur, “In China;” Wilbur, “China,” ARH, January 27, 1903, 12.

  24. Mrs. Anderson, “Our Work in China;” Ida E. Thompson, “Our School Work in China,” ARH, June 2, 1904, 22.

  25. Statistical Report of Conferences and Missions for the Year Ending December 31, 1902, 3, accessed March 11, 2020, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1902.pdf.

  26. Mrs. Anderson, “Our Work in China.”

  27. J. N. Anderson, “Central China,” ARH, May 5, 1903, 11; J. N. Anderson, “Our Work in Central China;” Pilquist, “A Letter from Honan, China,” ARH, July 21, 1903, 15.

  28. J. N. Anderson, “An Aged Pioneer Fallen,” ARH, July 7, 1903, 22.

  29. “Hong Kong, China,” The Workers’ Bulletin, April 5, 1904, 154.

  30. Pilquist, “A Letter from Honan, China,” 15, 16.

  31. Mission Board, “Our Inland Chinese Mission,” The Workers’ Bulletin, October 20, 1903, 58; “Off for the Heart of China,” The Life Boat, November 1903, 317.

  32. Estella Houser, “Mission Notes,” The New York Indicator, July 15, 1903, 2.

  33. Pilquist, “The Outlook in China,” The Welcome Visitor, September 9, 1903, 3.

  34. “Change of Address,” ARH, December 17, 1903, 22.

  35. “Field Notes,” ARH, February 25, 1904, 20.

  36. “Statistical Report of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination, for 1903,” ARH, August 18,1904, 14.

  37. Thompson, “Our School Work in China.”

  38. “A Chinese School,” The Signs of the Times, June 1, 1904, 13; Thompson, “Our School Work in China;” “Our Work in China,” The Signs of the Times, August 31, 1904, 13.

  39. Wilbur, “China,” ARH, December 8,1904, 17; For details of this school, see Wilbur, “The Boys’ School, Canton, China,” ARH, March 23, 1905, 12.

  40. “China Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1905), 84.

  41. R. W. Munson, “Good News from China,” Union Conference Record, November 15, 1904, 8; B. L. Anderson安理純, “The Process of the Organization of the Fukien Church” 「福建教會成立的經過」, Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》, January 15 and February 1, 1936, 41.

  42. For details, see W. C. Hankins, “Entering Amoy, China,” ARH, August 31, 1905, 13, 14; Hankins, “Amoy, China,” The Workers’ Bulletin, December 19, 1905, 1, 2; Hankins, “China,” ARH, August 23, 1906, 16.

  43. Zijie Hong洪子杰 (T. K. Ang), “Say a Few Word About the Process of How I Believe and Work” 「說幾句我信道和工作的經過」, Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》, January 15 and February 1, 1936, 45.

  44. Hankins, “China.”

  45. A. C. Selmon, “Laid to Rest in China: Maude Amelia Miller obituary,” ARH, May 4, 1903, 23.

  46. W. A. Spicer, “A New Agency in China,” ARH, August 3, 1905, 5; Miller, “Shang Tsai Hsien, Honan, China,” The Welcome Visitor, September 13, 1905, 3; For more details, see Miller, “Story of the China Mission Printing-Press,” ARH, January 11, 1906, 12, 13.

  47. John J. Westrup, “China,” ARH, October 18,1906, 18, 19.

  48. For details, see Keem Law, “Fat Shan, China,” Pacific Union Recorder, December 19, 1907, 3; See F. H. Loasby, “The Advent Message in the Far East China,” The Youth’s Instructor, April 4, 1911, 10; “Emma A. Perrine, Percival J. Laird…,” The Workers’ Bulletin, October 9,1906, 56; Emma A. Laird, “Changsha, Hunan, China…,” The Workers’ Bulletin, January 29, 1907, 120; E. H. Gates, “China,” ARH, July 25, 1907, 18; Wilbur, “A Word from E. H. Wilbur,” The Workers’ Bulletin, November 26, 1907, 2; Wilbur, “China,” ARH, January 2, 1908, 15.

  49. J. N. Anderson, “The General Meeting for China,” ARH, May 30, 1907, 13.

  50. “China Mission,” “Chinese Printing Office,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1908), 131, 157; “China Mission,” “Chinese Seventh-day Adventist Mission Press,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1909), 134, 135, 162.

  51. “The steamship ‘Minnesota,’…,” ARH, April 2, 1908, 32.

  52. “We are pleased to announce…,” Pacific Union Recorder, February 13, 1908, 16.

  53. R. W. Schwarz, Light Bearers to the Remnant (Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1979), 366.

  54. “The new Chinese paper…,” Adventist Review and Sabbath Herald, October 1, 1908, 24.

  55. “In the Asiatic Division,” The Adventist Review and Sabbath Herald, June 16, 1909, 18.

  56. H. E. Rogers complied, Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions, and Institutions: For the Year Ending December 31, 1908 (Takoma Park Station, Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1908), 10.

  57. “Notes,” Report of Progress for Southern Union Conference and South-Eastern Union Conference, January 12, 1909, 1.

  58. I. H. Evans, “The Shanghai Meeting,” Adventist Review and Sabbath Herald, March 18, 1909, 16, 17.

  59. “In the Asiatic Division;” Loasby, “The Advent Message in the Far East China,” 11.

  60. J. N. Anderson, “The Chinese Union Mission Field,” Adventist Review and Sabbath Herald, May 20, 1909, 12, 13.

  61. “In the Asiatic Division.”

  62. Evans, “The Shanghai Meeting,” 18; “Word has been received…,” Adventist Review and Sabbath Herald, March 4, 1909, 32.

  63. J. P. Anderson, “China,” Adventist Review and Sabbath Herald, August 19, 1909, 14.

  64. “Accessions to the Faith in China,” Union Conference Record, June 21, 1909, 3; Contrell, “East China Mission’” ”Frederick Lee, “Anhwei Province, China,” The ARH, October 27, 1910, 8; M. Ellsworth Olsen, A History of the Origin and Progress of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 658; J. G. Gjording, “In Remembrance: Han Tsung Djen Obituary,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1928, 22.

  65. “In the Asiatic Division,” 22

  66. Ibid, 18.

  67. “Fuh In Hsuen Pao,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1909), 171; “Shi Chao Yueh Pao,” “Chinese Seventh-day Adventist Mission Press,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1910), 173.

  68. “In the Asiatic Division,” 18.

  69. “View from China: An Unfortunate Fire,” Sign of the Times, February 22, 1910.

  70. “From Brother B. A. Roberts…,” Signs of the Time, June 14, 1910, 15 (367); E. R. Palmer, “Periodical Sales in China,” ARH, September 1, 1910, 19.

  71. Fisher, “Chekiang Province, China;” Cantrell, “East China Mission.”

  72. Mrs. Bothilde Miller米純貞, “After Coming to China”「到了中國以後」, Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》, February 15, 1936, 27.

  73. Ibid; “Beginning June 5…,” ARH, August 4, 1910, 24; Cantrell, “East China Mission.”

  74. “Encouraging Word from China,” Union Conference Record, November 28, 1910, 3; F. E. Stafford, “A Visit to Nanking, the Ancient Capital of China,” Signs of the Times, August 30, 1910, 15.

  75. Miller, “China Union Training School,” The Signs of the Times, Melbourne, Victoria, May 15, 1911, 314; Congguang Sun孫從光, "The reality of attending school in the first school of the Adventist Church in China"「在中華本會第一所學校裡讀書的狀況」, Last Day Shepherd’s Call《末世牧聲》, January 15 and February 1, 1936, 54.

  76. J. N. Anderson, “Pakhoi, China,” ARH, August 11, 1910, 9; W. A. Westworth, “China,” ARH, August 25, 1910, 9; Miller, “Life of A. H. Bach,” The Columbia Union Visitor, February 12, 1913, 2.

  77. Evans, “Letter from Elder I. V. Evans,” Lake Union Herald, May 24, 1911, 1; “Another City Center,” The ARH, February 2, 1911, 13; W. A. Westworth, “In Northern China,” March 9, 1911, 9.

  78. Law, “Fat Shan, China,” ARH, December 8, 1910, 10; Law, “An Appeal from Heathen China,” The Life Boat, September 1910, 290; Wilbur, “Canton, China,” ARH, July 27, 1911, 13; O. J. Grundset, “South China Mission,” The Youth’s Instructor, June 10, 1913, 4.

  79. “On account of the condition of his wife…,” ARH, August 4, 1910, 24.

  80. “From San Francisco…,” The ARH, September 22, 1910, 24.

  81. “Asiatic Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911), 132-34; H. E. Rogers complied, Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions, and Institutions: For the Year Ending December 31, 1910 (Takoma Park Station, Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1910), 12

  82. “Asiatic Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911), 132-34.

  83. Evans, “Meetings in South China,” The ARH, June 13, 1912, 11.

  84. “South China Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1913), 143.

  85. “Brother S. A. Nagel…,” The ARH, March 28, 1912, 24; “Miss Ida Thompson reports…,” News Letter for the Asiatic, April 1, 1912, 3; Evans, “Meetings in South China.”

  86. M. E. Keen, “Mable Gertrude Thompson Obituary,” ARH, February 13, 1913, 166 (22).

  87. “Week of Prayer Greeting,” ARH, December 5, 1912, 10.

  88. “Brother George Harlow sends the following…,” News Letter for The Asiatic, October 1, 1912, 6.

  89. S. A. Nagel, “Hongkong, China,” ARH, February January 30, 1913, 108 (12).

  90. O. A. Hall, “Opening of the Training School,” News Letter for the Asiatic, November 1, 1912, 9.

  91. Joint Meeting of the Asiatic Division and China Union Mission Committee, November 10, 1912, 1, Folder Asiatic Division & East China Mission Committee Minutes 1912, General Conference Archive.

  92. “Asiatic Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1913), 141-43.

  93. “Asiatic Division Conference,” “North China Union Mission,” “South China Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1915), 131, 146-49.

×

Chiu, Joshua C. S. "China Union Mission (1901–1912)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Accessed January 15, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=C8AX.

Chiu, Joshua C. S. "China Union Mission (1901–1912)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Date of access January 15, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=C8AX.

Chiu, Joshua C. S. (2021, January 09). China Union Mission (1901–1912). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved January 15, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=C8AX.