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​China Mission was the first administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in China. J. N. Anderson was its first superintendent. As the mission expanded, it was reorganized in 1909 as China Union Mission, which was dissolved three years later in 1912, allowing each mission unit to interact directly with the Asiatic Division.

​The Chinese Union Mission is an attached union to the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

​East Asia Association and its predecessor, Eastern Asia Committee, were important administrative entities formed in response to the complex challenges the Seventh-day Adventist Church faced due to changes in China’s attitude toward Christianity and the western world during the post-Cultural Revolution era of the late 1970s to 1990s.

The East China Union established the East China Union Academy when the Japanese then occupied most of the union’s territory during the Pacific War.

Elizabeth Armstrong Dowell served on the Asiatic Division office team in Shanghai from 1917 to 1922.

Thomas S. Geraty served the Seventh-day Adventist Church for almost forty-five years as a teacher, pastor, missionary, and educational administrator in three divisions and at the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

​Walter Emslie and Helen Agnes Gillis devoted thirty years of service to the foreign mission fields in Asia. Walter is often remembered as the pioneer missionary who was responsible for the development and construction of major Seventh-day Adventist mission headquarters compounds in Shanghai and Xi’an in China; Seoul in Korea; and Singapore in Southeast Asia. Also, as the early manager of the Signs of the Times Publishing Houses in these countries, he was also responsible for building up the publishing ministries in the Asia-Pacific region.

Gertrude Mary Green gave fifty-four-and-a-half years of her sixty-three-year nursing career to missionary nursing, teaching and nursing administration in China and the Far East.

​Guo, Ziying (郭子颖), also known in early denominational publications as Keh, Nga Pit, is usually acknowledged as the first ordained national Chinese minister of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in China.

William and Virginia Hilliard served in the China Division and the Far Eastern Division from 1947 to 1961.

William and Jessie Hilliard served in China and other parts of the Far East from 1916 to 1962.

Hong Kong Adventist Hospital is a member of the Adventist Health global network, and is governed by the Chinese Union Mission and Northern Asia-Pacific Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

​Hong, Zijie (洪子杰), also known as Ang Tau Kiet, was the second indigenous Chinese Seventh-day Adventist minister ordained in China.

Alton and Emma Hughes were pioneering missionaries to China where they pastored and taught.

​Eric John Johanson devoted 54 years of faithful service to the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Asia, America, and in his homeland of Australia. Eric and Nettie were pioneer missionaries to China, Singapore, and Southeast Asia, where their impact was widely felt.

​Khang Kiat Tien, also in some Adventist literature as KT Khang or KT Khng, was a pioneer Chinese evangelist best remembered as the author of several books on tracing Christian and Biblical concepts in Chinese written characters.

​Frederick Martin Larsen (1888-1984) was a Norwegian-American church worker and missionary from c.1918 until c.1953. Larsen spent his entire career working for the Seventh-day Adventist church both as a missionary in China and Jamaica, and as a pastor and field missions secretary in the United States.

Law Keem (Liu Jian) was a pioneer medical missionary in southern China and the first Adventist Chinese national to return to serve in his homeland.

Frederick Lee was a pioneer missionary to China for some thirty years, where he served in a variety of capacities including evangelist, administrator, and editor of the Chinese Signs of the Times.