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John Peter Anderson was a missionary to China. As a missionary, he mastered the Hakka and Swatow dialects while working in China.

Lucy Andrus taught in church schools in Minnesota and Washington State for a decade before giving 16 years of active mission service in China as a teacher and Bible worker.

​Robert Brown served as secretary and treasurer in the Virginia and District of Columbia conferences prior to overseas mission service in China for six years. He returned to the United States as business manager of the denominational sanitariums in Boulder and Denver, Colorado.

​During the 1920s and 1930s Alexander Buzzell served for 13 years as a director of two local missions in China, the East Kweichow Mission followed by the West Szechwan Mission.

​Milton Conger served as a missionary teacher in China and a pastor, conference president, and college lecturer within the Columbia Union Conference.

​Elmer and Leatha Coulston were medical missionaries in northern China in the early 1930s. Their united pioneering efforts were cut short when Elmer died of diphtheria in 1934.

​Donald Edward and Pearl Ivy Hoyt Davenport were Seventh-day Adventist medical missionaries to China.

​East Asia Association and its predecessor, Eastern Asia Committee, were important administrative entities formed in response to the complex challenges the Seventh-day Adventist Church faced due to changes in China’s attitude toward Christianity and the western world during the post-Cultural Revolution era of the late 1970s to 1990s.

​Walter Emslie and Helen Agnes Gillis devoted thirty years of service to the foreign mission fields in Asia. Walter is often remembered as the pioneer missionary who was responsible for the development and construction of major Seventh-day Adventist mission headquarters compounds in Shanghai and Xi’an in China; Seoul in Korea; and Singapore in Southeast Asia. Also, as the early manager of the Signs of the Times Publishing Houses in these countries, he was also responsible for building up the publishing ministries in the Asia-Pacific region.

​Hong, Zijie (洪子杰), also known as Ang Tau Kiet, was the second indigenous Chinese Seventh-day Adventist minister ordained in China.

Zijing Huang (黃子敬) was a Chinese scholar and ordained minister who served in his homeland province of Sichuan, and later at the denominational training school in the province of Jiangsu. He was murdered by Japanese invasion forces in 1938.

​Frederick Martin Larsen (1888-1984) was a Norwegian-American church worker and missionary from c.1918 until c.1953. Larsen spent his entire career working for the Seventh-day Adventist church both as a missionary in China and Jamaica, and as a pastor and field missions secretary in the United States.

​Esta Miller was a younger brother of Dr. Harry Miller, a pioneer missionary to China. He was counted among the early Seventh-day Adventists who learned the Mandarin language and was instrumental in winning the initial Chinese converts prior to his premature death at twenty-six years of age.

The Mongolian Mission was an entity that existed in the 1930s as a subdivision of the North China Union Conference in the China Division of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. Geographically, the territory of the Mongolian Mission is often referred to as “Inner Mongolia,” which is part of China. This article deals exclusively with the history of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Inner Mongolia.

​Charlotte Simpson was a missionary nurse to China in the early 1900’s. Her Chinese name was 和辛普生 (Pinyin hé xīn pǔ sheng).

Herbert and his wife, Thelma, were pioneer missionaries in Central China in the 1920s. Herbert’s ministry was tragically cut short when he was murdered by bandits. Thelma bravely continued her service in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan until her retirement in 1972.

​American missionary in The United States, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan from 1927 until 1984. Smith’s husband Herbert was murdered by bandits in China weeks after arriving at their first mission posting as young newlyweds and young parents. Mrs. Smith remained in Asia as a missionary for most of the next forty-seven years.

American missionary to China from 1902 to 1931, Ida Thompson opened the first Adventist school in China – Bethel Girls School in Canton (Guangzhou). That school became what is now Hong Kong Adventist College.

Alonzo and Julia Wearner were missionary nurses to China; Alonzo also served as an administrator, pastor, chaplain, author, and religion teacher.

Durward and Ora Williams were educators who served in America, China, and the Philippines.