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Vincent Hill School and College.

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Vincent Hill School and College

By Gordon E. Christo

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Gordon E. Christo, Ph.D. in Old Testament and Adventist Studies (Andrews University). Christo is retired and working on contract as assistant editor of the Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists and assistant editor of the Seventh-day Adventist International Biblical-Theological Dictionary. He is currently setting up a heritage center for Southern Asia Division. Some of his research on Adventist history can be seen at https://sudheritage.blogspot.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/SUDHeritage/.

First Published: September 15, 2022

Vincent Hill School and College was a boarding institution operated from 1922-1969 in Mussoorie, India, for children of missionaries, domiciled Europeans, and Anglo-Indians.

Background

The first Seventh-day Adventist school for European and Anglo-Indian children in India opened at 154 Bow Bazaar in 1899 with Miss May Taylor and Mrs. F. W. Brown as teachers. Miss Marion Belchambers, who later served as treasurer of several unions, was one of the pupils.1 In 1902, two years after the smallpox tragedy at Karmatar, Thekla Black and Anna Knight were assigned to reopen boarding facilities for English students there.2 However, “certain perplexities” caused this English school at Karmatar to be discontinued.3

At its organization in 1910 the India Union Mission discussed the recommendation of the General Conference “to establish a school to provide for the education of missionary children and other European children . . . in harmony with the plans of the General Conference Education Department, but with adaptations to the local conditions as deemed necessary.”4

Dingle Cottage, 1910

On a visit to Mussoorie, in the foothills of the Himalayas, Elder Shaw suggested to Sister H. H. D. Johnston that they open a small school in their home.5 Consequently, in 1910, Dingle Cottage opened for the children of Adventist missionaries and European church members. Children studied in the cool, pleasant climate of the hills, when it was hot in the plains, and during the cooler season, children went home for vacation.6 The Dingle was later used by missionaries in summer for language study and vacations.7

Annfield House, 1911-1920

In 1910 a commission consisting of J. L. Shaw and two others recommended that the school be moved to Annfield.8 Annfield House, a 23-acre property, also in Mussoorie, had been purchased by the Adventists in 1907 to serve as a rest home for workers from India and Burma.9 Mussoorie Intermediate School opened here on March 15, 1911,10 with Mrs. Edith E. Bruce as the first principal and Mrs. Alice O’Conner as her assistant.11 In September a separate school building was erected,12 and in 1912 a second school building was constructed.13 In 1912 the school became known as Mussoorie Primary and Intermediate School. From 1915 till it closed in 1920, it was known as the Mussoorie Primary and Middle English School.14 G. F. Furnival served as principal from 1914--1919.15 The last principal at Annfield was Thos D. Rowe in1920.16

As the missionary workforce and the membership of the English church grew, a larger school was required to prepare children to serve in the Indian mission.17 W. W. Fletcher wrote, “The welfare of these young people will depend more and more on what they are themselves and what they can do, and less and less on the advantages racial position may give.” Since Annfield was inadequate for a large student body and modern educational facilities,18 Vincent Hill, a property of forty-six acres also in Mussoorie, was acquired from Mrs. Keelan for Rs. 21,000 in 1919. The location had been known as Vincent Hill in memory of St. Vincent, even before the school was established.19 Work on the new school started almost immediately that winter.20

Hampton Court, 1921-1922

Since Vincent Hill was not ready, Hampton Court College was rented from Miss Florence Holland for two years.21 At the time the school had 160 boarders and eight day-scholars. Its five and a half acres was equipped with buildings, playgrounds, tennis, and badminton courts. The school opened its doors here on March 15, 1921.22 As the economic depression set in, completion dates for the school seemed uncertain. However, a resident of Mussoorie, Mrs. Raynor, made a contribution of Rs. 8000, and willed another 40,000 to the school at her death.23 Also, church members, both overseas and in India, were very generous with their individual offerings.24

Founding

The laying of the foundation stone on October 13, 1920, was attended by prominent Mussoorie citizens and leading Seventh-day Adventists. W. W. Fletcher, president of the Southern Asia Division, spoke briefly about the aims and plans for the school. As the foundation stone was set in place, Colonel J. H. Beer, chairman of the Mussoorie Municipal Board declared the stone to be well and truly laid. He invoked the blessing of the Architect of the universe on the building to be erected, and on all who would be engaged in educational work within its walls.25

In March 1922 the main building at Vincent Hill School was ready for occupancy.26 A. J. Olsen, from Kingsway College, Canada, was the first principal in 1922.27 The students, under the leadership of the faculty, were responsible for the cooking, sewing, laundry work, gardening and dairy work of the institution, along with various lines of technical and industrial training. Servants were eliminated as far as possible from the school homes with the hope that self-reliance would be developed in the young people by learning to do things for themselves.

Principals and Development

A. J. Olsen, 1922-1927. Though the basic buildings had been completed, there were plans for better facilities. The principal’s cottage–Citadel, the boy’s hostel, a manual training room for carpentry, and the girl’s parlor were added during A. J. Olsen’s time. Teachers helped raise funds during vacation.28 Students helped excavate the swimming tank. Unfortunately, plans remained incomplete due to Mrs. Olsen’s illness as the family had to return to the United States in May 1927.29

I. F. Blue, 1927-1938, D. W. McKinley (acting), 1931. Blue led a campaign to raise funds for the boys’ parlor and a covered playground, which was later enclosed to serve as a gym and meeting area.30A two-storey structure was added in 1928 for the dining room and the chapel that F. H. Loasby decorated with “Educate for Eternity.” Other additions included a kitchen,31 a two-ward hospital in 1934,32 a building for kindergarten classes up to grade six in 1937,33 as well as the little boys parlor.34 In May 1930 the journalism class began production of the school newspaper entitled V. H. S. Enterprise.35 Blue left the school in 1938.36

R. A. Garner, 1939-1942. The Garner era coincided with World War II and although enrollment dropped,37 construction of buildings continued. A new music conservatory, Sonatina, was added in 1942.38 In 1942 Garner was left to serve as secretary of the Educational and Missionary Volunteer Department in the South India Union.39

Cecil A. Schutt, 1943-1945. Around February 1944, the bakery building was completed, which also housed the Domestic Science classes.40 Construction on a new administration building began in 1945.41 The first Missionary Volunteer campout took place on Friday, May 26, 1944, with 51 young people and nine staff members in the woods behind the boys’ hostel. The MV camp became an annual affair.42 During the 1940’s, VHS began to have a regular sports week with the houses of past principals–Olsen, Garner, Blue. Competitions included track and field, tennis, badminton, field hockey, baseball, rounders, basketball, gymnastics, and football.43 Principal Schutt was called away from Vincent Hill to be principal of Spicer Missionary College in 1946.44

Hollis T. Terry, 1946 and 1947. Principal H. T. Terry took over in 1946 after World War II was over as missionaries and their children returned to India.45 During his time a structure with an assembly hall, laboratories, and classrooms for the science department was constructed. Ten new Underwood typewriters were acquired.46 At India’s Independence on August 15, 1947, Vincent Hill, along with other schools in Mussoorie, participated in the march past, dressed in blazers and carrying the school banner.47

Walter C. Mackett, 1948-1951, Ron E. Rice (acting), 1948. In 1948 Mr. Mackett became the first graduate of Vincent Hill to be elected principal. While he was on furlough in 1948, Professor R. E. Rice, also a VHS graduate, served as acting principal.48 Ron E. Rice was the first and only indigenous Anglo-Indian principal of VHC. He believed in equal pay for equal work irrespective of gender and raised Muriel McHenry’s salary.49

M. O. Manley, 1952-1961, H. H. Mattison (acting), 1956. During the holidays the dining room was refurbished, and the kitchen was moved to the domestic science classroom. A new parlor was added to the boy’s hostel. Both the boys’ and girls’ parlors received record players. The laundry was completed with washing machines and electric irons. Students were given the opportunity to work here and earn while studying.50

W. Gordon Jensen, 1962-1964. Pastor W. G. Jensen came to Vincent Hill as principal in 1962. His wife Betty taught music.51 From this time on, as enrollment decreased, expansion ceased.

August Warren Matheson, 1964-1967. A. W. Matheson arrived from Okanagan Academy, Canada, to be the principal at Vincent Hill. His wife Hazel served as the school nurse.52

Ivan D. Higgins, 1967-1969. Ivan D. Higgins, the last principal, came from Avondale College in the Australasian Division.53 The school closed its doors permanently on June 30, 1969.54

Enrollment and Curriculum

In 1922 Vincent Hill School opened with 80 students in twelve grades.55 In 1923 an extension of one year beyond grade twelve offered a combination of Bible and business classes.56 The following year the committee authorized the inclusion of a full junior college course in the 1924 calendar to commence not earlier than 1925.57 Junior college classes began in 1926, from whence it was known as Vincent Hill School and Junior College.58 In 1927 there were 125 in all classes, including three in the junior college.

At the inception, enrollment of non-Europeans was restricted to not more than 15 percent.59 However, Principal Blue opined in 1930 that “the time is not far distant when Indian students must be admitted to our schools on the same basis as Europeans. … Nothing I think hinders more the progress of God’s work than racial distinctions.”60 That year nearly a hundred out of the total 133 students were Adventists. In 1931 the division amended Policy No. 46 (d) to limit the number of non-Adventist students to 10 percent of which not more than half could be Asiatics.61 However, a letter from a newly converted businessman pointed out the inappropriateness of the policy, contrary to the spirit of Christ, which discriminated merely on the basis of race and color. The church administrators reconsidered the needs of English-speaking Indian families and opened the doors of VHS to Indian Adventists in 1934.62

The school seemed to reach an all-time high of 170 boarders in 1940. However, during World War II more than thirty missionaries left India, and the enrollment suffered.63 Missionaries returned after the war, but once India gained independence in 1947, the number of foreign missionaries was destined to decrease drastically. By now the institution was called Vincent Hill College.

Walter Mackett and Ron Rice played a crucial role in establishing the Junior (8th Standard) and Senior (10th Standard) Cambridge Exam at Vincent Hill. Though some argued that the school should not allow a non-Adventist to decide which students would pass or fail, yet the Cambridge exams became mandatory for every student.64

Vincent Hill College consisted of a very diverse population in 1950 with 19 percent non-Christians, 68 percent Seventh-day Adventists, and 13 percent Christians of other denominations. Children of local Adventist workers were 31 percent and 19 percent were children of foreign workers. Three junior college courses were offered at Vincent Hill: Ministerial, Normal (Teaching), and Commercial (Secretarial).65

A major change was effected in 1951, when students consisted of very few Americans, a couple of Danes, and a Brit or two. The rest were Indians, Pakistanis, mostly Sikhs –children of merchant families in Calcutta and of industrialists from Bombay. 66 The division under the leadership of President Robert Pierson, in a strong recommendation that followed 28 whereases, directed all high schools in the division to shun government recognition and to conform to denominational standards.67 Vincent Hill was directed to re-align their curriculum to prepare for the Division School Leaving Certificate exams.68

In response to this action, admission of non-Adventists at VHS was again limited to 15 percent. The cafeteria was directed to offer food comparable to homes of students. No more students would be admitted to the college grades, which were to be discontinued.69 (Missionary children transferred to Adventist colleges in their home countries, and anglo-Indians moved to Spicer College, which by now offered full four-year bachelor’s degrees.). Vincent Hill College then again became known as Vincent Hill School in 1952 until its closure in 1969.70

The shift from a spiral system to the American unit system would begin with the 1952 school year, while special coaching for those sitting for Cambridge exams would be provided. Henceforth GC recommended textbooks would be used.71 Students under third grade would not be accepted into boarding. A grammar school at Salisbury Park would be established for them.

In 1955 principal Manley was directed to inform the inspector of Anglo-Indian Schools “that because of circumstances we are not at present offering instruction preparing for the Senior Cambridge Certificate, and that we will not be following the government recognized program.”72 From then on till its closure in 1969 VHS followed the American unit system.

Closure of the School, 1969

After the reforms of 1952, students and faculty were mostly foreigners. But after India’s Independence, visas were limited, and student enrollment began to drop. By 1968 only fifty-eight were enrolled.73 Finally no more visas were granted for overseas teachers at Vincent Hill.74

Another reason involved financial difficulties. The school was not making a lot of money and was very expensive to operate. Most Seventh-day Adventist Indians and Anglo-Indians on the local Indian salary could not afford to send their children to Vincent Hill, and the fees could not be subsidized. The policy restricting the percentage of non-Adventists was still in force.75

In 1967 it was decided to close VHS and open a school on the plains up to the tenth grade.76 But the following year the action of 1967 was rescinded, and it was decided to continue operations from the present location indefinitely, strengthening the staff from available workers.77 Finally the Section II Committee decided to close the school and send students to the Far Eastern Academy in Singapore (which operated similarly for children of missionaries) or to their homelands.78 The school was officially closed on June 30, 1969.79 In September 1969, 36 students transferred to the Far Eastern Academy.80 The new Sikh owners renamed Vincent Hill School, “Guru Nanak V Centenary School.”

Legacy

The chief objective of Vincent Hill was to prepare boys and girls to take an active part in finishing God's work in Southern Asia, as well as in other parts of the world field.81 The institution fulfilled this role effectively.

After 30 years there were 66 workers serving in the division field who had attended Vincent Hill. These included principals, teachers, and ministers; as well as workers at the division headquarters, local missions, union departments, Voice of Prophecy school, Adventist medical centers, and educational departments in 1952.82

In subsequent years VHS turned out a president of the General Conference (Neal Wilson), three presidents of the Southern Asia Division (Neal Wilson, Roscoe Lowry, Gerald Christo), two college presidents (Ronald Rice and Neville Mathews), three union presidents (Weldon Mattison, Ed Streeter, and Gerald Christo), and many departmental directors of the division and unions.83 The school also produced a vice consul, Indian high commission in Australia and Canada, business leaders, technology experts, newscasters, principals, teachers, pastors, accountants, treasurers, doctors, nurses, secretaries in various parts of the world such as India, America, Australia, Canada, and Great Britain.84

But perhaps most importantly, according to Charles Schulz, “Role models at VHS inspired students to be strong Adventists, or serve in the mission, and also showed that you could be an SDA and still have fun.”85

Alumni are passionately faithful to the memory of their alma mater. A Facebook page “VHS School of Mine” (1922-1969), was created by Dennis Tidwell for students and faculty (and their families) who attended Vincent Hill School and College in Mussoorie, India, from the years 1922-1969. Members numbering 240 post news, photos, files, and events related to Vincent Hill School and Mussoorie.86

Alumni have also contributed generously for a two-story building next to the church on the campus of the division office in Hosur that provided halls for Sabbath School classes, storage for the Pathfinders and the church choir, space for the ordinances of humility, and a library. An arch that replicates the entrance of VHS leads to the plaza and entrance to the Sabbath School building, which stands as a memorial to Vincent Hill School.87

The Vale Head portion of the VHS campus has been retained by the Southern Asia Division. It houses a large bungalow and a small cottage. Small groups come here for retreats.

Official Names

At Hampton Court (1921): Vincent Hill School (1921)

At Vincent Hill (1922-1969): Vincent Hill School (1922-1925), Vincent Hill School and Junior College (1926-1945), Vincent Hill College (1946-1951), Vincent Hill School (1952-1969).

School Principals

At Hampton Court (1921): T. D. Rowe (1921).

At Vincent Hill (1922-1969): A. J. Olsen (1922-1927); Irwin F. Blue (1927-1930); D. W. McKinley, acting (1931); Irwin F. Blue (1932-1939); R. A. Garner (1939-1942); Cecil A. Schutt (1943-1945); Hollis T. Terry (1946 and 1947); Ronald E. Rice (acting) (1948); Walter C. Mackett (1948-1952); Myrl O. Manley (1952-1955); Howard H. Mattison (acting) (1956), Myrl O. Manley (1957-1962), Wesley Gordon. Jensen (1962-1964), Warren Matheson (1964-1967); Ivan D. Higgins (1967-1969).

Sources

Blue, I. F. “Report of Vincent Hill School and College.” Eastern Tidings, January 1, 1931.

Blue, I. F. “Vincent Hill School and College.” ARH, August 25, 1937.

Bruce, Edith. “Annfield School.” Eastern Tidings, April 15, 1911.

Campbell, James. “Used Literature Supplies.” Canadian Union Messenger, June 16, 1969.

Christo, Gerald J. Out of the Clay Pit. Hosur: Thompson Graphic & Co, 2009.

Christo, Gordon E. “Southern Asia Division.” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed June 2, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6AMO&highlight=Southern|Asia|Division|.

Enoch, G. F. “Hampton Court College.” Eastern Tidings, November 15, 1920.

“Extension of Curriculum.” Minutes of the Executive Committee of the Southern Asia Division, November 14, 1922.

Fletcher, W. W. “Vincent Hill School.” Eastern Tidings, September 1920, 1. (Vincent Hill School Special)

“Founders and Foundations: A Student’s Appreciation.” Southern Asia Tidings, February 1945.

Fulton, J. E. “Our English School at Mussoorie.” Eastern Tidings, February 1 & 15, 1920.

Garner, R. A. “Our School and Our Youth.” Eastern Tidings, February 15, 1943.

Ham, A. L. “Vincent Hill College.” Eastern Tidings, February 1946.

Hanson, Yvonne Hendley. Seasoned to Serve, a documentary of Vincent Hill School and College, 2008.

India Union Tidings. March 15, 1919.

“Junior College Classes.” Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, September 23, 1923, #1072. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

“Laundry Equipment Donated to Academy.” Far East Division Outlook, March 1970.

Mackett, W. C. “The Sacrificial Beginning of Vincent Hill College.” Eastern Tidings, February 1950.

Mackett, W. C. “What Vincent Hill Means to Southern Asia.” Eastern Tidings, February 1952.

Manley, M. O. “V.H.S. 1952 Preview.” Eastern Tidings, February 1952.

Manley, M. O. “Professor W. C. Mackett Leaves V. H. C.” Eastern Tidings, February 1952.

McHenry, M. “The Registrar Reports.” Eastern Tidings, February 1, 1951.

Minutes of Meetings, General Conference Committee, December 1-15, 1966. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Minutes of the Advisory Board of the India Union Mission, November 13, 1910; May 30, 1912. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Minutes of the Advisory Committee of the India Mission, February 2, 1902. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Minutes of the Overseas Personnel Committee of Southern Asia Division, August 2, 1952; April 14, 1955. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Minutes of the Executive Committee of the India Union Mission, September 15, 1911. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Minutes of the Section II Committee of Southern Asia Division, Apr 17, 1955; December 17, 1967; August 3-6, 1968; November 30, 1968. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, September 8, 1921, # 532. Southern Asia Division archives, Krishnagiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

Mookerjee, L. G. “A Comprehensive Survey of the Early Work.” Eastern Tidings, May 8, 1941.

“Percentage of Non-SDA Students in VHS.” Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, Dec 17-25, 1931.

“Poona Log-Book.” Southern Asia Tidings, January 1969.

“Poona Log-Book.” Southern Asia Tidings, September 1968.

“Rented Quarters.” Minutes of the Executive Board of the Southern Asia Division, June 12, 1920.

“School Committee.” Minutes of the Advisory Board of the India Union Mission, December 20, 1910.

“School for Europeans.” Report of the Plans Committee of the Fourth Biennial Session of the India SDA Mission, August 16, 1910.

“Vincent Hill School Notes.” Eastern Tidings, June 1, 1930.

“Vincent Hill School: In the Foothills of the Himalayas.” ARH, January 14, 1954.

Pohlman, E. W. “Faithful Vincent – Deacon and Martyr.” Eastern Tidings, February 1945.

Schutt, C. A. “V.H.S. Plans for 1944.” Eastern Tidings, February 1944.

Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. Second revised edition. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996. S.v. “Vincent Hill School.”

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, years 1913-1920. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Steeves, J. M. “Pastor Garner Bids Farewell to Vincent Hill School.” Southern Asia Tidings, February 15, 1943.

Terry, H. T. “Looking Forward to 1946.” Eastern Tidings, February 1946.

Notes

  1. L. G. Mookerjee, “A Comprehensive Survey of the Early Work,” Eastern Tidings, May 8, 1941, 7-11.

  2. Minutes of the Advisory Committee of the India Mission, February 2, 1902.

  3. Superintendent J. L. Shaw reviewed these in the discussion about setting up the Annfield School. Minutes of the Advisory Board of the India Union Mission, Nov 13, 1910, 12.

  4. “School for Europeans,” Report of the Plans Committee of the Fourth Biennial Session of the India SDA Mission, August 16, 1910, 3.

  5. W. C. Mackett, “The Sacrificial Beginning of Vincent Hill College,” Eastern Tidings, February 1950, 2.

  6. I. F. Blue, “Vincent Hill School and College,” ARH, August 25, 1937, 22.

  7. India Union Tidings, March 15, 1919, 3.

  8. “School Committee,” Minutes of the Advisory Board of the India Union Mission, December 20, 1910, 21.

  9. Mookerjee, 7-11.

  10. Edith Bruce, “Annfield School,” Eastern Tidings, April 15, 1911, 7.

  11. Mookerjee, 7-11.

  12. Minutes of the Executive Committee of the India Union Mission, September 15, 1911, 39.

  13. Minutes of the Advisory Board of the India Union Mission, May 30, 1912, 47.

  14. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks, 1913-1920.

  15. Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), s.v. “Vincent Hill School.”

  16. J. E. Fulton, “Our English School at Mussoorie,” Eastern Tidings, February 1 & 15, 1920, 1.

  17. Blue, 22; R.A. Garner, “Our School and Our Youth,” Southern Asia Tidings, February 15, 1943, 2.

  18. W. W. Fletcher, “Vincent Hill School,” Eastern Tidings, September 1920, 1. (Vincent Hill School Special)

  19. E. W. Pohlman, “Faithful Vincent – Deacon and Martyr,” Eastern Tidings, February 1945, 4.

  20. Jim Keelan, in an interview cited in Yvonne Hendley Hanson, Seasoned to Serve, a documentary of Vincent Hill School and College, Mussoorie, India, 1922-1969, published in 2008.

  21. “Rented Quarters,” Minutes of the Executive Board of the Southern Asia Division, # 206, June 12, 1920, 44.

  22. G. F. Enoch, “Hampton Court College,” Eastern Tidings, November 15, 1920, 3.

  23. George F. Enoch, interview in Seasoned to Serve.

  24. Mackett, 2.

  25. “Founders and Foundations: A Student’s Appreciation,” Southern Asia Tidings, February 1945, 1.

  26. John Tarr, interview in Seasoned to Serve.

  27. Ibid.

  28. Calvin Olsen, son of A. J. Olsen, in a letter to Mrs. Yvonne Hansen, “Chapter 7,” Seasoned to Serve.

  29. Ibid.

  30. I. F. Blue, “Vincent Hill School and College,” Eastern Tidings, November 1927, 5; “Chapter 9 – Irvin F. Blue, 1927-1939,” Seasoned to Serve.

  31. “Chapter 9 – Irvin F. Blue, 1927-1939,” Seasoned to Serve.

  32. Ibid.

  33. Blue, 1937, 22.

  34. “Chapter 9 – Irvin F. Blue, 1927-1939,” Seasoned to Serve.

  35. “Vincent Hill School Notes,” Eastern Tidings, June 1, 1930, 7.

  36. J. M. Steeves, “Pastor Garner Bids Farewell to Vincent Hill School,” Southern Asia Tidings, February 15, 1943, 2.

  37. “Chapter 14,” Seasoned to Serve.

  38. Steeves, 2; “Chapter 15,” Seasoned to Serve.

  39. Steeves, 2.

  40. C. A. Schutt, “V.H.S. Plans for 1944,” Eastern Tidings, February 1944, 3; C. A. Schutt, “Chapter 19 – Physical Plant Progress,” Seasoned to Serve.

  41. “Chapter 19 – Physical Plant Progress,” Seasoned to Serve.

  42. “Chapter 17- Recreational Activities,” Seasoned to Serve.

  43. Ibid.

  44. A. L. Ham, “Vincent Hill College,” Eastern Tidings, February 1946, 2.

  45. “Chapter 21 – Post World War II,” Seasoned to Serve

  46. H. T. Terry, “Looking Forward to 1946,” Eastern Tidings, February 1946, 3.

  47. “Chapter 22 – Winds of Change,” Seasoned to Serve

  48. M. O. Manley, “Professor W. C. Mackett Leaves V. H. C.” Eastern Tidings, February 1952, 7.

  49. “Chapter 23 – Ron E. Rice,” Seasoned to Serve.

  50. M. O. Manley, “V.H.S. 1952 Preview,” Eastern Tidings, February 1952, 3.

  51. “Chapter 32 – W. Gordon Jenson,” Seasoned to Serve.

  52. “Chapter 35 – August Warren Matheson,” Seasoned to Serve.

  53. Minutes of Meetings, General Conference Committee, December 1-15, 1966 (December 8), 282.

  54. James Campbell, “Used Literature Supplies,” Canadian Union Messenger, June 16, 1969, 2.

  55. Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), s.v. “Vincent Hill School.”

  56. “Extension of Curriculum,” Minutes of the Executive Committee of the Southern Asia Division, November 14, 1922.

  57. “Junior College Classes,” Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, Sept 23, 1923, #1072, 289.

  58. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks, 1926 onwards

  59. Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, Sept 8, 1921, # 532, 145.

  60. I. F. Blue, “Report of Vincent Hill School and College,” 22.

  61. “Percentage of Non-SDA Students in VHS,” Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, December 17-25, 1931, # 2854, 908.

  62. Gerald J Christo, Out of the Clay Pit (Hosur: Thompson Graphic & Co, 2009), 12.

  63. Gordon E. Christo, “Southern Asia Division,” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists, January 29, 2020, accessed June 2, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6AMO&highlight=Southern|Asia|Division.

  64. “Chapter 25 – Cambridge Exams,” Seasoned to Serve.

  65. M. McHenry, “The Registrar Reports,” Eastern Tidings, February 1, 1951, 4.

  66. “Chapters 26 & 27,” Seasoned to Serve.

  67. “Recognition High School,” Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, January 25, 1951, 3390-3393.

  68. “Vincent Hill College – Division Exams,” Minutes of the Southern Asia Division Committee, January 25, 1951, 3406.

  69. “Modification of VHS Program,” Minutes of the Overseas Personnel Committee of Southern Asia Division, # 460-466, August 2, 1952.

  70. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks, relevant years.

  71. “Modification of VHS Program,” Minutes of the Overseas Personnel Committee of Southern Asia Division, # 460-466, August 2, 1952.

  72. “Vincent Hill School – Derecognition,” Minutes of the Section II Committee of Southern Asia Division, # 55-II-82, Apr 14, 1955.

  73. “Poona Log-Book,” Southern Asia Tidings, September 1968, 2.

  74. “Chapter 37 – Ivan D. Higgins,” Seasoned to Serve.

  75. “Chapter 38 – Closure of VHS,” Seasoned to Serve.

  76. Vincent Hill School – Future,” Minutes of the Section II Committee of the Southern Asia Division, 67-II-1. December 17, 1967.

  77. “Vincent Hill School Future,” Minutes of the Section II Committee, 68-II-1, Aug 3-6, 1968.

  78. “Vincent Hill School – Discontinuance,” Minutes of the Section II Committee of the Southern Asia Division, # 68-II-26, November 30, 1968.

  79. Campbell, 2.

  80. “Chapter 38 – Closure of VHS,” Seasoned to Serve; “Laundry Equipment Donated to Academy,” Far East Division Outlook, March 1970, 3; “Poona Log-Book,” Southern Asia Tidings, October 1969, 32.

  81. “Vincent Hill School: In the Foothills of the Himalayas,” 1.

  82. W. C. Mackett, “What Vincent Hill Means to Southern Asia,” Eastern Tidings, February 1952, 3.

  83. Christo, 121.

  84. “Chapter 34 – Asian Success Stories,” Seasoned to Serve.

  85. “Chapter 27 – Myrl O. Manley,” Seasoned to Serve.

  86. See https://www.facebook.com/groups/200639663316802, accessed on June 2, 2022. The group has alumnus Dennis Tidwell as administrator.

  87. Christo, 121.

×

Christo, Gordon E. "Vincent Hill School and College." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. September 15, 2022. Accessed February 02, 2023. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CAMY.

Christo, Gordon E. "Vincent Hill School and College." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. September 15, 2022. Date of access February 02, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CAMY.

Christo, Gordon E. (2022, September 15). Vincent Hill School and College. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved February 02, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CAMY.