Lake Titicaca Mission

By Kebby Rodríguez Gutiérrez

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Kebby Rodríguez Gutiérrez

Lake Titicaca Mission (Misión Del Lago Titicaca or MLT) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church within the territory of South Peru Union Mission (Unión Peruana del Sur or UPS). It is headquartered on 115 Jirón Lima, Zip Code 21001, in the Miraflores neighborhood in the city of Puno, Puno province, Puno department, Republic of Peru.1

The missionary field of this Mission includes the department of Puno, where there are 754 congregations (268 organized churches and 486 groups) with 44,645 members within a population of 1,510,582 inhabitants. That is, in the ecclesiastical field of the MLT, the average is one Adventist per 34 inhabitants.2

The MLT, through the Puno Adventist Educational Association, aims to better prepare the youth of the Church as well as to provide society with the opportunity to enjoy an education with Christian principles. For this purpose, it has 16 school units: Brandeen Adventist Academy, located on 428 Jirón (Jr.) Brandeen, Progreso, Puno; Islas Los Uros Adventist Academy, Puno, established in Isla Adventista Uros, Puno; Puno Adventist Academy, located between the corner of Jr. Deza with Jr. Piura, Puno; Titicaca Adventist Academy, located on exit highway Arequipa km 6, Juliaca (rural area), Puno; Edén Adventist Academy, located on Jirón Huayrapata Manzana (Mz) E Lot 4, Juliaca, Puno; Los Angeles Adventist Academy, established in Jr. Tupac Yupanqui s/n, San Antón, Puno; Arturo Carcagno Adventist Academy, located on 526 Jr. Puno, Azángaro, Puno; and Los Andes Adventist Academy, located on 135 Juliaca Avenue, Huancané, Puno.3

Puno Adventist Educational Association has other schools under its administration, including Fernando Stahl Adventist Academy, located on Jr. Fernando Stahl s/n, Platería, Puno; Mariscal Castilla Adventist Academy, located on 415 Jirón Conde de Lemus, Ilave, Puno; Panamericana Adventist Academy, established on 860 Tupac Amaru avenue, Yunguyo, Puno; Luciano Chambi Adventist Educational Institution, located on 510 Ilo Avenue, Nueva Esperanza Binacional neighborhood, Desaguadero (Perú), Puno; Amantaní Adventist Academy, located on Isla Amantaní, Amantaní, Puno; Belén Adventist Academy, located on 1635 Jr. Apurímac, Manco Cápac, Juliaca, Puno; Pedro Kalbermatter Adventist Academy, located on 730 Jr. Moquegua, Ayaviri, Puno; and Americana Adventist Academy, established on 335 Jr. Santiago Mamani, Grau Park, Urbanización La Rinconada, Juliaca, Puno.4

In order to manage the institutions and lead Adventists in the MLT field, this Mission has a total of 313 staff members, with 34 ordained pastors, 17 licensed pastors, four credentialed missionaries and fve licensed missionaries.5

The Origin of the Adventist Church Work in the Mission Territory

The Adventist work in the Peruvian highlands began with the missionary efforts of Manuel Zúñiga Camacho. This remarkable person, a native of Utawilaya, is considered the pioneer of Adventist education in Peru.6 In 1902, he established a small school of 12 students known as the Escuela Rural de Utawilaya [Utawilaya Rural School]. It suffered constant attacks from the local clergy in 1908, when it had to be closed at the request of Monsignor Valentín Ampuero.7 Despite these difficulties, Camacho, upon meeting Pr. A. N. Allen and J. W. Westphal, was helped by them to consolidate this noble work in Utawilaya.

Soon after, the General Conference (GC) decided to send Ferdinand Stahl along with his wife Ana, his daughter, Frena, and his son, Wallace,8 to the South American Andes. At first, they thought of settling in Bolivia,9 but the neighboring country was not receptive to the message at that time. In 1910, the family embarked for Platería, where the locals invited them to join the Zúñiga Camacho community. A few months later, in July 1911, Stahl settled in the Utawilaya school and later moved with his family to Platería in 1913. There, the educational work formally began with the indigenous community in April,10 and it achieved great success.

Very soon, Platería Adventist Academy would emerge11 and, years later, Chullunquiani Adventist Academy, where the present Peruvian Union University (UPeU) is located in Filial Juliaca. During those years, mission stations were established in many places in Puno, including Platería, Ilave, Lampa, Umuchi, Piata, Laro, Sandia, and Uros. Each mission station manages an average of 10 to 20 elementary schools. With the help of Pastor Westphal and Pastor Allen, the Stahls were able to purchase land neighboring the Camacho's home. There, Stahl decided to build a mission that would include a school and a medical clinic,12 Platería Mission, which is currently known as “The First Indian Mission.” In short, the educational work is considered the impetus for the emergence of evangelistic work in the region.

The Mission Organizational History

With the progressive consolidation of the work in this region of Lake Titicaca, the MLT was formally organized in 1916.13 At that time, the Lake Titicaca Indian Mission was organized with four churches14 and was headquartered in Puno. Ferdinand Stahl was its first superintendent and secretary, and J. C. Howell was the first treasurer. Its territory included the departments of Puno, Cusco, and Madre de Dios in Peru, and part of the Lake Titicaca basin in Bolivia.15 Since its establishment, the MLT experienced five years of expansive growth due to evangelism through education. Those were golden years for the Mission, which is remembered in many ways and taken as an example by the presidents of later years. Pastor E. H. Wilcox, the second superintendent who worked from 1921 to 1924, did a remarkable job with the rise of Adventist institutions such as Titicaca Adventist Academy (CAT)16 and the present Juliaca Adventist Clinic (CAJ), which was established in 1922. In 1925, Pastor F. E. Bresee assumed the position of superintendent, and worked for eight years, becoming the leader who served the longest providing direction for the Mission.17

In 1933, Pastor Jacob Wagner was appointed the first director of the MLT and worked there for two years. But G. F. Ruf was the first president to be officially recognized, according to the 1936 SDA Yearbook.18 Five years later, the canvassing work, through the Publishing Ministry, was highly encouraged from 1941 to 1946, when A. M. Tillman was the Mission president. Likewise, on May 8, 1946, the MLT mission station was created, and by 1947, the Mission had 13 mission stations: Ilave, Juliaca, Jullicunca, Occo-pampa, Laro, Pacastiti, Platería, Piata, Pomata, Sandia, Umuchi, Yanaoco, and Vilquechico.19 In this last period, it is important to highlight once again the strong relationship between the evangelizing work and the educational work in the area. So, in 1948, the MLT began making more investments to improve the CAT. Among the improvements for the academy were the development plans for the educational service. For this reason, South American Division (SAD) provided the necessary funds and made possible the execution of the plans for this educational work.

Within 1954 and 1956, 2,912 people had been baptized throughout the Mission territory and, at that time, there were already 21 mission stations operating.20 However, no one expected that there would be a severe drought in the highlands, leaving most families without food. Those two years caused severe problems for all Puno. At that time, the Mission attempted to relieve the situation by distributing vegetable seeds and other supplies. But due to that drought, the number of churches reduced from 34 (in 1956)21 to 31 (at the end of 1958). Membership also decreased from 10,838 (in 1957) to 10,525 (in 1958).22 While there was a surprising increase in collection during 1958, those were still difficult years.23

Within 1959 and 1962, Pastor Wellesley Muir assumed the presidency. During that time, an important step was taken in the discipleship of the brethren of Puno. Bible studies recorded on disk were developed in the Quechua and Aymara languages so that the message could reach all the families who lived in the highlands in their own dialect.24 In 1966, under the administration of Pastor G. Herman Guy, the floating school project was presented, which is now an iconic element in the Uros Islands. Through the dedication of Professor Carlos Velásquez, a Sabbath School was organized there with 25 members.25 However, in that same year, the MLT, which administered the districts surrounding Lake Titicaca (Platería, Chucuito and Umuchi), had an annual growth rate of 12.27% which was possible due to the joint work with the brethren and 39 pastors (11 ordained and 18 licensed). During that phase, the MLT administered 42 organized churches and served 11,740 members.

The following year, in 1967, the MLT, in addition to administering the districts surrounding Lake Titicaca (Platería, Chucuito and Umuchi), began to administer the departments of Apurímac, Arequipa, Cusco, Madre de Dios, Moquegua and Tacna. In other words, from that moment, the Mission needed to reorganize itself and so it adopted the name of Peruvian South Mission (MPS) since its territory would cover the entire southern region of Peru. 26 Likewise, the person in charge of leading this institution with 46 organized churches and a membership of 12,116 Adventists was Pastor Luis A. Alana who, along with 43 pastors, sought to bring the Gospel to a population of approximately 2,437,100 inhabitants.27

Pastor Eduardo Cayrus assumed the MPS leadership in 1972, and it was during this administration that the Survey commission was created to form a new Mission.28 Thus, in 1975, it was recommended that the Mission should be divided into two administrative units. For this reason, the MPS retook the name of MLT, and the new Mission received the name of South Peru Mission (MPS), and it was headquartered in the city of Arequipa. In this way, with the support and recommendations from Inca Union Mission (present South Peru Union Mission) for the division of the territory, the MLT began to operate on January 1, 1977, in the same offices located on 115 Lima Street, Puno. In this new ecclesiastical organization, pastors Arturo Carcaño and Melvi Atoche, president and secretary-treasurer respectively, led 52 churches with 21,231 members in a population of 780,000.29 The following year, as part of the Mission's evangelistic plan, several meetings were held, and they resulted in more than 200 people being baptized.

Two years after its reorganization, at the historic I Triennial Congress of the MLT that took place on January 3, 197930, the report on the growth of the Mission was read. In two years, 11 churches had been organized, representing significant growth for the time.31 The newly established congregations were Villa Esperanza, Ilave, Collana, Huancarani, Pucará, Quepa, Huancollusco, Titihue, Chilcapata, Manco Cápac and Choquechambi. In this way, the evangelistic development project advanced with the help of the Seventh-day Adventist Welfare Service, SAWS (presently ADRA). With the community garden planting program launched among the indigenous people of the Lake Titicaca region, 3,800 residents cultivated their own plots over a period of two years and harvested enough to supplement their needs. Furthermore, the sale of surpluses generated income for families to acquire resources.32

In the early 1990s, the Mission team, concerned with new ways to evangelize the region, encouraged the development of short, medium, and long-term evangelistic projects to prepare them for the second millennium. Therefore, this decade was characterized by massive evangelization at the stadiums within the “Global 2000” plan, which consisted of mobilizing the church members to gather first in the houses, then invite their friends to study the Bible together, and finally introduce them to a different lifestyle in Jesus.33 Likewise, in 1992, the MLT carried out the Great Metropolitan Evangelistic Campaign in the city of Juliaca with the new seminar “Revelaciones y Profecías para esta hora” [Revelations and Prophecies for this time]. This new method consisted of presenting the Holy Bible, the Word of God, as the reliable prophetic book. The seminars sought to reach a professional class audience.34

In the 1990s, thanks to new evangelistic strategies, missionary efforts continued to be carried out. For example, in 1994, the “Programa Pentecostés 94” [Pentecost 94 Program] took place, which culminated in the opening of a radio station.35 From this project, the formation of the radio program “La Voz de la Esperanza” [The Voice of Hope] began. Thus, this Mission was a pioneer in radio work in Peru.36 This radio station, based in the department of Puno, initially held an 18-hour schedule in Aymara, Quechua, and Spanish. In 1995, this Adventist radio station already had two broadcast studios and high-quality professional equipment.37 In conclusion, all these missionary actions contributed for the MLT to serve 22 missionary districts, 212 organized churches and 380 groups, in 1994. The total number of members was 70,431 Adventists.38 In addition, 29 churches were built, and 46 were under construction.39 In fact, these years were a clear example of how God was guiding this noble work in Puno.

A little more than 10 years later, in 2006, the MLT became part of the administrative territory of South Peru Union Mission. This happened on the occasion of the division of Peru Union Mission (present UPS) and, consequently, the establishment of North Peru Union Mission in 2007.40 Since then, the MLT administration has been influenced and inspired by the stories of the missionary efforts of the Stahls, Kalbermatter, and Camacho families, pioneer families of Adventism in the region that have sought to continue that legacy of faith and courage by conquering, with divine power, the highlands. Thus, with that confidence, in 2008, it reached the number of 73,573 members, 263 organized churches, and 553 groups.41

In 2016, the MLT celebrated 100 years of Adventism in the highlands. On that important occasion for the Church, on the morning of September 30, “leaders and visitors remembered the beginning of the Adventist Church in the Peruvian highlands.” In a symbolic gesture, they visited Pedro Kalbermatter's house, which was converted into a museum and is in the northern part of the region, in Laro, Choquehuanca district, Azángaro province. In this house-museum “lie some belongings of the pioneer, such as a rifle, kitchen utensils, lighters, a photo gallery, among other things of historical value, that today recall the beginnings of the Adventist Church and Adventist Education in Peru.” The following day, as part of the celebrations, “church administrators, brethren, and thousands of students hailed Adventist Education and the 100th anniversary of Lake Titicaca Mission with a slightly patriotic civic parade in the Plaza de Armas, in the city of Juliaca.” This event was a recognition of the work started by “Adventist education in the country [that] began in Platería with the teaching of Pastor Fernando Stahl, who promoted the literacy process of a large percentage of the rural population.” Likewise, in the afternoon, the I “Centenary – MLT” Symposium took place at the UPeU branch in Juliaca with the aim of enriching and motivating those present with the history of the MLT.42

For the last several years, this Mission, as an administrative unit of the UPS, has been collaborating on many projects that aim to reach the youth in Southern Peru. Among those programs, there is a project called “Misión Caleb” [Caleb Mission], an initiative promoted by the SAD. This program seeks to involve church youth and invites them to donate their vacation in favor of those most in need by carrying out activities such as blood donation, cleaning streets and beaches, conducting community visits, etc. But the most important thing in these short days is that the whole community is invited to participate in a series of meetings held in one location in order to hear the Word of God and accept it fully in their lives.43

As a result of these and other missionary actions, throughout the MLT territory, effectively, many people have decided to follow Jesus and have been baptized. Thus, in 2016, 3,852 people were baptized, and within 2017 and 2018, a total of 5,383 new disciples were cultivated, and there was a growth of 19.2 percent in tithes and offerings.44 This solid growth indicates that the order of Christ has been fulfilled in this Mission with much effort on the part of everyone.

Today, Lake Titicaca Mission has leaders and members committed to the mission of preaching the Gospel. For that reason, in order to do a more effective job, the MLT administration decided to create zones that are made up of missionary districts according to their geographical region. Thus, in the MLT, each missionary district is in a specific area to better serve the needs of the brethren and society in Puno. In addition, following the SAD plan to have a strong discipleship program for children, adolescents, and youth, in 2020, they reached the total of 87 Pathfinders clubs45 and 53 Adventurers clubs.46 In this way, the MLT also serves about 3,000 children and adolescents with the goal of “saving from sin and guiding in service.”47

In short, the MLT, with more than 100 years of history, continues to fulfill the mission of proclaiming the everlasting Gospel based on the message of the three angels of Revelation 14:6-12. This message invites people to become disciples of Jesus Christ and prepare for His soon return. One of the lessons that can be drawn from the MLT journey is that God blesses the united missionary effort of His people. It is God who gives the sowing, the good harvest, and the permanence of the fruits. If people work hand in hand with the Lord, there will be nothing to fear about the future. For that reason, MLT members seek to carry out their mission through a Christlike life: preaching, discipling, teaching, healing, and serving others. This is in harmony with the Scriptures’ great prophecies and the plan of God to restore all things according to His perfect will and justice. Thus, one of the challenges and plans of the MLT is to make each new believer a disciple who wins others for the kingdom of God, consolidating them as true missionaries and heirs of God.

Chronology of Administrative Leaders 48

Presidents: F. A. Stahl (1916-1919); E. H. Wilcox (1920-1923); F. E. Bresee (1924-1932); Jacob Wagner (1933-1934); G. F. Ruf (1935-1938); G. E. Stacey (1939-1940); A. M. Tillman (1941-1945); B. W. Steinweg (1948-1952); Oswald Krause (1953-1957); Wellesley Muir (1958-1960); D. K. Sullivan (1961-1962); G. H. Guy (1964-1965); Luis A. Alana (1966-1969); Eduardo Cayrus (1971-1976); Arturo Carcagno (1977-1978); Eliezer Sánchez (1979-1985); David Alarcón (1986-1989); Juan Castro (1990-1991); Lucio Calle (1992-1994); Angel Cotacallapa (1995-1997); Santos Corrales (1998-2000); Rubén Jaimes (2001-2004); Julio Medina (2005-2008); Javier Cahuana (2009); Gedeón Herrera (2010-2012); Javier Tula (2013-2016); José Chávez Pacahuala (2017-Present).

Secretaries: J. M. Howell (1916-1917); Reid Shepard (1917-1918); J. S. Hindbaugh (1920); H. M. Colburn (1921-1924); P. H. Barnes (1925-1928); J. Wagner (1929-1932); S. Alberro (1933-1934); F. E. Vansickle (1936-1940); J. I. Hartman (1941); E. C. Christie (1942-1947); F. C. Petty (1948-1951); W. H. Olson (1952-1956); Pablo Silva (1957); Jorge Montalvo (1958-1959); W. C. Brown (1960); L. D. Cleveland (1961-1962); L. D. Wood (1963-1966); Alden Denslow (1968-1969); D. L. Schatzschneider (1971-1973); Arturo Carcagno (1975); Yoshi Yamawaki (1976); Melvi Atoche (1977-1979); Jacob Mejía (1980-1985); Esdras Simeón (1986-1987); Roberto Souza (1988-1992); Lud Casildo (1993-1995); Braulio Huanca (1996-2000); Abel Guevara (2001-2002); Abraham Huamani (2003-2005); Tobías Chávez (2006-2007); Javier Tula (2008-2012); Heber Castillo (2013-2015); Michael Ccoa (2016-2018); Ronald Aquije Herencia (2019-Present).

Treasurers: J. M. Howell (1916-1917); Reid Shepard (1917-1918); J. S. Hindbaugh (1920); H. M. Colburn (1921-1924); P. H. Barnes (1925-1928); J. Wagner (1929-1932); S. Alberro (1933-1934); F. E. Vansickle (1936-1940); J. I. Hartman (1941); E. C. Christie (1942-1947); F. C. Petty (1948-1951); W. H. Olson (1952-1956); Pablo Silva (1957); Jorge Montalvo (1958-1959); W. C. Brown (1960); L. D. Cleveland (1961-1962); L. D. Wood (1963-1966); Alden Denslow (1968-1969); D. L. Schatzschneider (1971-1973); Felipe Alcón (1975); Yoshi Yamawaki (1976); Melvi Atoche (1977-1979); Jacob Mejía (1980-1985); Esdras Simeon (1986-1988); Ricardo Salazar (1989); Lud Casildo (1990-1995); Braulio Huanca (1996-2000); Abel Guevara (2001-2002); Abraham Huamani (2003-2005); Tobías Chávez (2006-2007); Eber Melgar (2008); Juan Paucara (2009-2014); Tobías Chávez (2015-2018); Samuel Martínez (2019-Present).49

Sources

2019 Annual Statistical Report. Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2019.

Alomía, Merling K. “Comienzos de la obra educativa adventista en el Perú” [The beginning of Adventist educational work in Peru]. Theologika 1, no. 1 (July 1983).

Arn, Rubén E. “Global Seminar 2000 in Peru.” Ministry 71, no. 10 (October 1998).

Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, January 30, 1967, vote no. 67-41.

Greenleaf, Floyd. Tierra de esperanza: el crecimiento de la iglesia adventista en Sudamérica (A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America). Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2011.

“Hechos y comentarios en Sudamérica” [Facts and Comments in South America]. Revista Adventista, December 1993.

Lake Titicaca Mission. Noveno Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Ninth Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission]. Puno, 1965.

Lake Titicaca Mission. “Primer Congreso Trienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [First Triennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission]. Juliaca, January 3, 1979, 1.

Lake Titicaca Mission. “Reunión de la Junta Directiva de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Meeting of the Board of Directors of Lake Titicaca Mission]. Puno, 1946-1953.

Lake Titicaca Mission. “Reunión de la Junta Directiva de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Meeting of the Board of Directors of Lake Titicaca Mission]. Puno, 1992-1995.

Lake Titicaca Mission. Séptimo Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Seventh Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission]. Puno, 1959.

Lake Titicaca Mission. Sexto Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Sixth Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission]. Puno, 1956.

Muir, Wellesley. Indiecito: de la brujería al magistrado [Little indian: from witchcraft to magistrate]. Lima: Peruvian Union University, 2011.

Portal de la Educación Adventista [Adventist Education Website]. https://www.educacionadventista.com/.

Portal del Ministerio de los Conquistadores y Aventureros [Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministry Website]. https://clubes.adventistas.org/es.

Seventh-Day Adventist Church website. https://adventistas.org/es/.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics. http://www.adventiststatistics.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Tapia, Estela and Rosmery Sánchez. “Celebraron 100 años de adventismo en el altiplano peruano” [It was celebrated 100 years of Adventism in the Peruvian highlands]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), October 12, 2016.

Vásquez, Deyler. “Jóvenes adventistas impactan el sur del Perú con acciones solidarias” [Adventist youth impact southern Peru with solidarity actions]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), February 12, 2020.

Westphal, J. W. “Peru.” ARH, July 8, 1909.

Notes

  1. “Lake Titicaca Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 258.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Lake Titicaca Mission,” accessed May 5, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bmaW3Q.

  3. Portal de la Educación Adventista [Adventist Education Website], “Mapas: Perú,” accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WHoZeS.

  4. Ibid.

  5. “South American Division,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD.: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2019), 43.

  6. J. W. Westphal, “Peru,” ARH, July 8, 1909, 19.

  7. Merling K. Alomía, “Comienzos de la obra educativa adventista en el Perú” [The beginning of Adventist educational work in Peru], Theologika 1, no. 1 (July 1983): 122-123.

  8. Floyd Greenleaf, Tierra de esperanza: el crecimiento de la Iglesia Adventista Sudamericana (A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America), Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2011, 133.

  9. E. W. Thomann, upon returning to Chile, left Stahl as director of Bolivia Mission. Floyd Greenleaf, Tierra de esperanza: El crecimiento de la Iglesia Adventista Sudamericana (A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America), Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2011, 133.

  10. Wellesley Muir, Indiecito: de la brujería al magistrado [Little indian: from witchcraft to magistrate], Lima: Peruvian Union University, 2011, 6.

  11. Fernando A. Stahl, En el País de Los Incas [In the country of the Incas], Buenos Aires, Argentina: F. South American Spanish Publishing House, 1935, 86, 97.

  12. Floyd Greenleaf, Tierra de esperanza: el crecimiento de la Iglesia Adventista Sudamericana (A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America), Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2011, 133-134.

  13. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Lake Titicaca Mission,” accessed April 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bmaW3Q.

  14. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Lake Titicaca Mission - Yearly Statistics (1916-2018),” accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3fE0I1Q.

  15. “Lake Titicaca Indian Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917), 164.

  16. Portal de la Educación Adventista [Adventist Education Website], “Mi Colegio - Nosotros” [My College - About Us], accessed April 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WMVbh2.

  17. “Lake Titicaca Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 175.

  18. “Inca Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1936), 186.

  19. Lake Titicaca Mission, “Reunión de la Junta Directiva de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Meeting of the Board of Directors of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1946-1953: 47-26.

  20. Lake Titicaca Mission, Sexto Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Sixth Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1956, 6.

  21. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Lake Titicaca Mission - Yearly Statistics (1956-1958),” accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bmYbG7.

  22. Lake Titicaca Mission, Sexto Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Sixth Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1956, 6.

  23. “Lake Titicaca Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1959), 158.

  24. Lake Titicaca Mission, Séptimo Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Seventh Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1959, 3.

  25. Lake Titicaca Mission, Noveno Congreso Bienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca [Ninth Biennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1965, 3.

  26. Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, January 30, 1967, vote no. 67-41.

  27. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Lake Titicaca Mission - Yearly Statistics (1966-1966),” accessed May 8, 2020, https://bit.ly/2SQqgzf.

  28. “South Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1973-1974), 233.

  29. “Lake Titicaca Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1978), 265.

  30. Lake Titicaca Mission, “Primer Congreso Trienal de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [First Triennial Congress of Lake Titicaca Mission], Juliaca, January 3, 1979: 1.

  31. Ibid.

  32. Greenleaf, Tierra de esperanza: el crecimiento de la Iglesia Adventista Sudamericana (A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America), 658.

  33. Rubén E. Arn, “Global Seminar 2000 in Peru,” Ministry 71, no. 10 (October 1998): 17.

  34. Lake Titicaca Mission, “Reunión de la Junta Directiva de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Meeting of the Board of Directors of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1992-1995: 15.

  35. “Hechos y comentarios en Sudamérica” [Facts and Comments in South America], Revista Adventista, December 1993, 29.

  36. Ibid.

  37. Lake Titicaca Mission, “Reunión de la Junta Directiva de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Meeting of the Board of Directors of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1992-1995: 9.

  38. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Lake Titicaca Mission - Yearly Statistics (1994-1994),” accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/35U8Vun.

  39. Lake Titicaca Mission, “Reunión de la Junta Directiva de la Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Meeting of the Board of Directors of Lake Titicaca Mission], Puno, 1992-1995: 9.

  40. “South Peru Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2007), 280; “North Peru Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2007), 270.

  41. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Lake Titicaca Mission - Yearly Statistics (2008-2008),” accessed May 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/35ydE4E.

  42. Estela Tapia and Rosmery Sánchez, “Celebraron 100 años de adventismo en el altiplano peruano” [It was celebrated 100 years of Adventism in the Peruvian highlands], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], October 12, 2016, accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/2STMf8s.

  43. Deyler Vásquez, “Jóvenes adventistas impactan el sur del Perú con acciones solidarias” [Adventist youth impact southern Peru with solidarity actions], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], February 12, 2020, accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3brixOh.

  44. “South American Division,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD.: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2019), 20.

  45. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet, in general, once a week to learn to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” These adolescents “are thrilled with outdoor activities as camping, hiking, climbing, exploring the woods and caves. [...] It is worth mentioning their knowledge of outdoor survival in places that are not easily accessible. They know how to cook outdoors, light a fire without matches, among others.” Besides, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awakened by manual arts, and fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Seventh-Day Adventist Church Website, “¿Quiénes son los Conquistadores?” [Who are the Pathfinders?], accessed February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2TpEBBY.

  46. “The Adventurers Club is a program for children under 10 years old, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the USA, in 1972. [...] In 1991, the General Conference authorized it as a world program, establishing its objectives.” Seventh-day Adventist Church website, “Aventureros: Historia” [Adventurers: History], accessed February 27, 2020, http://bit.ly/2PwNatP.

  47. Portal del Ministerio de los Conquistadores y Aventureros [Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministry Website], “Estadística - Misión del Lago Titicaca” [Statistics - Lake Titicaca Mission], accessed May 5, 2020, https://bit.ly/2z8bmgF; Seventh-day Adventist Church website, “Jóvenes” [Young People], accessed May 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3dujdE6.

  48. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Lake Titicaca Mission,” accessed May 5, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bmaW3Q; “Lake Titicaca Indian Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1916), 157; “Lake Titicaca Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 258. For more about all the presidents, secretaries, and treasurers in the MLT, see the SDA Yearbooks from 1916 to 2019.

  49. More information about the MLT can be found on their website at https://mlt.adventistas.org/ or on social networks at Facebook: @AdventistasMLT; Twitter: @AdventistasMLT; and YouTube: Misión del Lago Titicaca.

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Gutiérrez, Kebby Rodríguez. "Lake Titicaca Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 23, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGL5.

Gutiérrez, Kebby Rodríguez. "Lake Titicaca Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGL5.

Gutiérrez, Kebby Rodríguez (2021, April 28). Lake Titicaca Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGL5.