Central Argentine Conference headquarters.

Photo courtesy of Central Argentine Conference Archives, accessed on February 23, 2020, https://www.facebook.com/AACENTRAL/.

Central Argentine Conference

By Angel Jesús Torrel Shapiama, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Silvia C. Scholtus

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Angel Jesús Torrel Shapiama

Eugenio Di Dionisio

Silvia C. Scholtus

First Published: May 28, 2021

The Central Argentine Conference (AAC), an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of the Argentine Union, has its administrative headquarters at Avenida Sabattini 1662, CPA X5014ATV, Maipú neighborhood, city of Córdoba, province of Córdoba, Argentine Republic.1

The AAC covers the provinces of Córdoba, Entre Ríos, and Santa Fe (except the northern region) that have a combined population of 7,986,853. A total of 23,312 church members belong to 234 congregations (131 organized churches and 103 groups) in 40 pastoral districts, an average of 1 Adventist for every 342 inhabitants.2

In the AAC territory, Adventist education has as its goal “promoting the integral development of the students to form autonomous citizens, committed to the well-being of the community, to the homeland, and to God."3 Thus, it serves about 3,590 children and adolescents through 16 educational institutions, of which 6 are middle schools and 9 are elementary schools.

The middle schools are: Cordoba Adventist Academy, located at Taninga 3150, Oña neighborhood, Córdoba, with 595 students; Parana Adventist Academy, located at Los Dragones de Entre Ríos 680, Entre Ríos, with 562 students; River Plate Adventist Academy, (associated with the River Plate Adventist University), located at Ave. 25 de Mayo 99, Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos; Capitan Bermudez Adventist Academy, located at San Salvador 242, Capitán Bermúdez, Santa Fe, with 502 students; Rosario Adventist Academy, located at Morrison 8102, Fisherton neighborhood, Rosario, Santa Fe, with 438 students; and Santa Fe Adventist Academy, located at 1 de Mayo 2853, Santa Fe, with 502 students.4

The elementary schools and their current enrollments are: Alta Gracia Adventist School, located at Manuel Alfonso 390, Tiro Federal neighborhood, Córdoba, with 128 students; Cordoba Adventist School, located at Blvd. Arturo Illia 271, Córdoba, with 232 students; Aldea San Antonio Adventist School, located in the rural area of Aldea San Antonio, Entre Ríos, with 28 students; Crespo Adventist School, located in the rural area of the Isletas District, near Crespo, Diamante Department, Entre Ríos, with 9 students; Colonia Centenario Adventist School, located at Route 18, Kilometer 62, Colonia Centenario, Entre Ríos, with 41 students; Galarza Adventist School, located at San José 552, Galarza, Entre Ríos, with 179 students; Hasenkamp Adventist School, located at Israel Elberg 370, Hasenkamp, Entre Ríos, with 87 students; Hasenkamp Campo Adventist School, located at Colonia Oficial no. 4, Hasenkamp, Entre Ríos, with 6 students; Obispo Norte Adventist School, located at Colonia El Clavo, Obispo Norte, Rosario del Tala, Entre Ríos, with 8 students; Parana Adventist School-Angelina Vergara Onetto, located at Almafuerte 1599, Paraná, Entre Ríos, with 167 students; and the Viale Adventist School, located at Hipólito Yrigoyen 330, Viale, Entre Ríos, with 193 students.5

Committed to spreading the gospel, the AAC has as broadcasting facility New Time Radio Cordoba, located at Luis Braille 1653, X5014APQ, Córdoba, Córdoba province, Argentina,6 on the 92.9 FM frequency.7

The total employees of the Central Argentine Conference are 338. Two have missionary licenses, 82 with missionary credentials, 14 with ministerial licenses, and 37 with ministerial credentials.

The Origin of the SDA Church Work in the Conference Territory

Adventists emerged in Argentina among different groups of Protestant immigrants who expressed interest in knowing the church’s beliefs. Though Argentina did pass immigration laws that sought to encourage the arrival of those with more progressive outlooks,8 it did not attract Adventists. In other words, the Adventist Church did not emerge in Argentina through an influx of immigrants who already held such beliefs. Rather it resulted from the development of a national mission to strengthen and expand the interest already occurring in South America.

The message of the Seventh-day Adventist Church came through two different means to the colonies in the province of Santa Fe and Entre Ríos. Once planted there, it would spread to other parts of the country through the influence of laity and publications.9

Adventism reached the city of Entre Ríos through George (Jorge) Riffel, who, after his conversion in the United States,10 began to write about his new faith to friends in the German Russian colonies in Argentina. One of his recipients replied that he believed in the Sabbath and that he would observe it if someone would come to join him. So, at the end of 1889, Riffel returned with his family, accompanied by three other families: the Fricks, Yankes and Zimmermanns. On one of the first Fridays of 1890, they landed at Diamante port, province of Entre Ríos, Argentina.11

Soon they met Reinhardt Hetze, who had received a letter from his brother who also lived in Kansas and another one from J. Riffel. Both letters mentioned that Riffel would arrive to let them know about Adventist beliefs. Hetze took him to where he lived. The next day about 60 people gathered at Hetze's house to listen to Riffel. Then they had meetings several nights in a row.12 Thus, Jorge Riffel began to teach about the faith he had found.13

Meanwhile, around 1885, the Italian Pedro Peverini who lived in the colony of Las Garzas, north of Santa Fe province, Argentina, read a magazine published in Torre Pellice in Piedmont, Italy. It told about Adventists living in Switzerland and their beliefs about Bible prophecy. Wanting to know more about Adventism,14 the Peverinis subscribed to the Adventist periodical.

News coming from Argentina to the U.S.A. encouraged many to serve as self-supporting missionaries by selling Adventist religious publications. Sent by the General Conference International Tract Society,15 the first three missionary literature evangelists,16Elwin Snyder, Clair Nowlin and Alberto Stauffer, arrived in December 1891.17 They spread Adventist literature throughout different parts of Argentina. Nowlin and Snyder worked in Buenos Aires. Stauffer, who was fluent in German as well as English, visited German and French-speaking settlers in the provinces of Santa Fe and Entre Ríos.18 In turn, as a result of Stauffer's activities in Santa Fe, a family of 12 accepted Adventism and shared it with another family.19

Meanwhile, in Entre Ríos, as the group of believers in the area grew, Jorge Riffel asked the General Conference to send a pastor to baptize the new believers and organize a church in the area. In 1894, Frank Westphal and his wife, Mary Thurston, arrived and settled in an area mostly populated by English-speaking people, which included communities of British origin (Irish, Scots, and Welsh) located at Solá Station, near the Roca Railways, in the province of Buenos Aires. Frank was the first missionary with credentials that allowed him to organize and baptize on behalf of the Adventist Church in South America.20

Soon, Frank Westphal left his family settled in Buenos Aires and began his first missionary tour. He initially went to Entre Ríos to visit the German-speaking colonies. Reaching Diamante in Entre Ríos on a very cold and wet winter day, he managed to make himself understood despite the difficulties of the language to obtain directions to the Adventist colony in the area of Crespo Campo (now Jacobi Village). There he visited the Riffel family home. Many of those interested in Adventist beliefs gathered at his house. Thus, on September 9, 1894, Westphal organized the first church in Argentina and South America, with 36 members.21 On that same day, he baptized the first converts from Crespo, Entre Ríos.22

Pastor Westphal extended his visit to San Cristóbal, Santa Fe, where he held meetings for two weeks at the Mangold family home, whom he instructed, baptized, and organized as a church with 13 members. It was the second church to be organized in early 1895. Then he formed the Buenos Aires group.23

In the second half of that same year, he organized the fourth Adventist Church in Felicia, Santa Fe, an event led by pastors Jean Vuilleumier and Frank Westphal. The church had 25 French members at that time, including Julio Dupertuis, Ida Arn de Dupertuis (from Felicia), Alberto Arn, Floris Mathieu (from Esperanza), the Dobantón family, and Arnoldo Pidoux and his wife (from Colonia Grütly). Obviously, those who formed this church came from different groups that met in neighboring towns. One of the elders of one of the groups, Rodolfo Diriwaechter, participated in its establishment.24Furthermore, in 1896, Jean Vuilleumier organized the church at Las Tunas, Santa Fe.25 There the first school in Argentina for training missionaries began to operate.

In addition to the influence of publications in spreading Adventist beliefs, the first missionaries were very clear that, in order for people to better understand biblical teachings, they needed to study them for themselves. That required knowing how to read. At that time, literacy was still rather limited.26 Besides, because they were Protestants, Adventists could not attend Catholic schools. Adventist education in the country quickly grew as on fertile soil. An example is the initiative that established the first school in the province of Entre Ríos, operating between 1896 and 1898 in the fields of the Racedo family. In Las Garzas, Santa Fe province, Lionel Brooking opened a school in 1897, intended to prepare literature evangelists.27

An imperative need was the development of local missionaries who could speak Spanish.

That demanded something greater than that of schools in family homes like those conducted in Entre Ríos and Santa Fe. It required higher levels of education. Therefore, on September 26, 1898, in Jacobi Village, Crespo, church leaders voted to open an educational institution in Entre Ríos province. The resulting Camarero Adventist Academy would later be called River Plate Adventist Academy (now River Plate Adventist University). Pastor Nelson Town was its first director28 and had the support of Frank H. Westphal. Jorge Juan Lust donated 17 hectares of land in Colonia Camarero for the establishment of the academy.29 The educational institution would become a source of missionaries for all of Latin America.

Since the majority of Adventist believers lived between the provinces of Santa Fe and Entre Ríos, in 1902 the second annual meeting of the River Plate Conference took place in the Humbolt, province of Santa Fe. The conference name alluded to the fact that its territory included Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay.30

Besides biblical doctrines, other early missionaries in Argentina sought to introduce a healthier lifestyle. One of the first individuals trained in the health area was Ole Oppegar, a Norwegian, who arrived in Argentina in 1895. Oppegard had studied in the United States.31 Noting the importance of spreading Adventist beliefs with the help of the health message, church members requested the General Conference to send them a physician.

In December 1901 the first missionary physician, Robert (Roberto) Habenicht, arrived with his family in Buenos Aires. His wife, Adela Allen, was a nurse.32 They settled in the area of Camarero and Crespo in Entre Ríos province. His successful care of patients in the area and his work as a physician and pastor, along with his wife Adela, made him think seriously about starting a sanitarium. And after a few years, the annual administrative meeting of the Adventist Church voted to build a sanitarium (now River Plate Adventist Sanitarium and Hospital) in connection with the school launched in Entre Ríos. The River Plate Adventist Sanitarium and Hospital opened November 15, 1908, with Dr. Habenicht as its first physician and director. His first patient was General Eduardo Racedo.33

Interest in the Adventist message continued to grow and spread in Gualeguaychú and San Juan in the province of Entre Ríos. By the end of 1903, 15 people had been baptized.34 A church organized in Urdinarrain, Entre Ríos, where John Maas worked. Groups of believers also formed in Carcarañá and San Gerónimo in the province of Santa Fe. It was in the latter place that the third annual meeting of River Plate Conference convened March 18-27, 1904.35 The fourth annual meeting took place in Lehman, Santa Fe province, on October 6-16, 1904.36

At the beginning of 1905, an evangelism series began in Concordia, Entre Ríos. Roberto Habenicht and two assistants conducted tent meetings. Before they even started, a group of six or seven people was already observing the Sabbath.37 Joseph Westphal, the conference president, reported during the fifth annual meeting (October 10-19, 1905) held in Rosario Tala, Entre Ríos, that a church at San Gerónimo, Santa Fe, had been organized on March 25.38

In 1906, the River Plate Conference reorganized with a reduced territory, Uruguay being organized separately and Paraguay and the Argentine province of Misiones forming another mission. They would all come under the umbrella of the South American Union Conference.39 On October 29, 1906, a change in the name occurred, with the River Plate Conference becoming the Argentine Conference, since most of the territory was now within that country. Its administration included Joseph Westphal, president; Robert Habenicht, vice president; Nelson Town, secretary-treasurer; and R. Dirivaechter, the first publishing director. They planned for the offices to be in Buenos Aires.40

The seventh annual meeting of the Argentine Conference convened in Gualeguay, Entre Ríos province, October 21, 1907. The territory had seen only 15 baptisms, but two new churches were formally accepted: Rosario, Santa Fe province, and Lucas González, Entre Ríos province.41 The leaders were now Nelson Town, president; Joseph Westphal, vice president; Arturo Fulton, secretary-treasurer; and Ottena de Fulton, secretary of the Sabbath School department.42 But the following year, 1908, when Town transferred to the General Conference, Westphal again became president with G. E. Emmenegger as secretary and A. Fulton as treasurer.

In February 1912, the conference once again restructured its territory. The provinces of Formosa, Chaco, and north Corrientes (with a line that ran from the city of Santo Tomé to Empedrados) were incorporated into the Alto Paraná Mission, which also included the province of Misiones and the country of Paraguay.43

The October 1912 conference sessions elected Frank Westphal as president, but he had to decline because of health reasons. So, his brother Joseph continued as president until March 1914, when B. C. Haak, an American, assumed the position. Shortly after his arrival, the Argentine Conference separated off another part of its territory to form a separate mission under the South American Union Conference. The new unit included the provinces of Chubut, Santa Cruz, Tierra del Fuego, the Falkland Islands, and the Magallanes Chile section. Haak served as president for just a few months before contracting typhoid fever and dying in November. J. Westphal again assumed the presidency until Roscoe T. Baer arrived in August 1915.

In February 1916, the rest of the Corrientes province became part of the Alto Paraná Mission. In October 1916, the name Conferencia Argentina [Argentine Conference] changed to Argentine Association [New Argentine Conference]. Leadership felt that it needed a name understandable to Spanish-speaking people.44 In December 1919, the South American Division authorized the Argentine Conference to cede the province of Buenos Aires so that it could organize itself into a conference of its own under the direction of the Austral Union Conference. Roscoe T. Baer continued as president until March 1919 when F. L. Perry, who had been in Chile, arrived. 45

The Conference Organizational History

For many years the Austral Union Conference supervised the church’s activities in Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and Paraguay.46 But it felt the need for a restructuring that would better serve the growth of Adventist churches in the Argentine Republic’s vast territory. At that time, the Argentine Conference served most of the Argentine territory (except the Misiones, Formosa, Chaco, and Corrientes territories).47 Therefore, the meetings during February 24 to March 5, 1921, in Santa Fe approved a new organization dividing Argentina into three administrative units: Buenos Aires Conference; Central Argentine Mission, and the North Argentine Conference.48 The sessions carried out in the city of Paraná, Entre Ríos province, October 13-21, 1922, indicate that the North Argentine Conference was the successor of the Argentine Conference. Almost all those who had responsibilities in it now continued their functions in the North Argentine Conference (AAN), except for some departmental pastors.

AAN began its activities under the presidency of F. L. Perry, who remained in that position for just one year before receiving a call to return to his home country.49 Pastor C. E. Krieghoff50 was appointed to serve as secretary and treasurer, and he held those roles until 1922. Due to the territorial changes, the location of the offices also shifted. They went from Buenos Aires to the city of Rosario, at 2200 Laprida Street, Rosario, province of Santa Fe.51 In the new configuration, AAN began with 13 organized churches, 913 members, and 4 ordained pastors, 2 licensed pastors, and 2 individuals with missionary licenses52 to serve the provinces of Entre Ríos, Santa Fe, Córdoba, La Rioja, Santiago del Estero, Tucumán, Catamarca, Salta, Los Andes, and Jujuy.53 The conference struggled with financial difficulties throughout its history. For example, in 1921, a single individual would simultaneously direct several departments.

In that same year, the leaders discussed the permanent location of the offices, and though they remained temporarily in Rosario, in 1923 they finally moved to the city of Paraná, Entre Ríos. Since the building located at Gualeguay 167, Paraná, was not quite suitable, the conference purchased a piece of land located at Calle Cervantes, around the corner from Córdoba. From 1925 to 1935 the headquarters remained at Cervantes 144, Paraná, Entre Ríos.

In 1926, the conference decided to mimeograph a periodical for literature evangelists, office employees, and isolated members. At first called the North Argentine Conference Radio,54 over time it changed the name and suspended publication.55 In addition, in the same year, two church buildings were inaugurated in the territory, one on September 17 in Felicia, Santa Fe, another on October 24 in Viale, Entre Ríos, and the third in Maggiolo, Santa Fe.56 Subsequently, in 1928, the province of Gobernación de los Andes became part of the North Argentine Conference territory. With this new addition, in 1929 the AAN had grown to 1,338 members and 24 churches.57

It was at the AAN biennial session in the city of Viale, Entre Ríos, that the largest meeting in that field until then took place, held October 2-11, 1930.58 It changed the conference name from North Argentina Conference to Central Argentina Conference (ACC), because approximately a year earlier it had ceded the northern provinces of its territory to the Austral Union Conference in order to form the Northwestern Argentine Mission, which would better serve the provinces of Tucumán, Salta, Santiago del Estero, Catamarca, Jujuy, La Rioja, and Gobernación de los Andes. That same session reelected J. M. Meier and C. E. Krieghoff59 as president60 and secretary-treasurer. In the new configuration, the ACC would administer the 22 churches and 1,514 members in Entre Ríos, Santa Fe and Córdoba with a combined population of 2,433,89161 (1 Adventist for every 1,608 inhabitants).62

Most of the believers lived in various immigrant communities and small towns. Little had been done to spread Adventist beliefs in the cities.63 But interest in evangelizing them developed during the following decades. Thus, since 1934, leadership increasingly desired to erect a church building in the capital city of Santa Fe province.64 The Argentine Union Conference could not financially support the project, but the following year the Buenos Aires Publishing House made a donation to purchase a piece of land. It was not until 1938, however, that a formally appointed commission began to raise funds and oversee construction. The building was completed and dedicated on April 6, 1940, thus establishing an Adventist presence in a major city.65

Around March 1936, the ACC headquarters relocated from Paraná, Entre Ríos, to 1882 Jujuy Street, Rosario, Santa Fe. The following year, they moved again to 3046 Catamarca Street in the same city. But since the transfer did not satisfy everyone, during November and December 1939, the conference offices would return to 144 Cervantes Street, Paraná, Entre Ríos.66

Continuing with the efforts to reach the ACC cities, the conference planned the construction of a church complex in the capital of Córdoba province in 1939. Unfortunately, they could not buy property until 1943 and inaugurated the building in 1947.67 During that same period, the conference dedicated another church structure on July 5, 1941, in Ramírez, Entre Ríos. And finally, the Crespo Church, the first one organized in the South American Division, finished the construction and dedication of its new building, December 30, 1944, on the occasion of the congregation’s fiftieth anniversary.68 Near the end of 1950, the conference, after so many territorial changes, church constructions, and evangelistic series, had a total of 2,666 members.69

At the beginning of the 1960s, during January 24-28, 1961, the forty-first ACC biennial session took place in Puiggari, Entre Ríos. Leadership informed the delegates that the conference had, as of December 31, 1960, 30 churches and 4,183 members, and that 35 evangelistic series had taken place during the previous two years. The Bible Correspondence School had 2,937 active students, and, in addition, 155 students had been baptized. Lay members held 98 series of evangelistic meetings, and finally, 834 students attended the 20 elementary schools. The session reelected Pablo Seidl as president and Benito Kalbermatter as secretary-treasurer.70

In 1971, the AAC was under the presidency of M. E Gutiérrez and only included the provinces of Entre Ríos, Córdoba and Santa Fe. It had 6,192 members and 40 organized churches in the midst of a population of 4,579,039,71 an average of 1 Adventist for every 739 inhabitants. New challenges would face the conference, and, therefore, another change occurred in 1972. In an effort to simplify administration, the Austral Union Conference reduced the five local fields in Argentina to three, and the provinces previously administered by the Cuyo Mission (organized in 1943) joined the Central Argentine Conference, with the exception of the Catamarca province.72

As a result of the restructuring, until 2012 the ACC consisted of Entre Ríos, Córdoba, Santa Fe (except the northern region), Mendoza, La Rioja, San Juan, and San Luis provinces. Its administrative headquarters were now located at 1662 Sabattini Avenue, Maipú neighborhood, city of Córdoba, Córdoba province.73 As a result of efforts to grow and strengthen the conference,74 the plenary meeting of the Argentine Union Conference decided to divide the AAC and organize a Central West Argentine Mission (MACO) that began operation in 2013,75 serving the regions of Mendoza, La Rioja, San Juan, and San Luis.

The same session also decided that ACC territory would only consist of Entre Ríos, Córdoba, and Santa Fe (except the northern region) and would continue with Fernando Müller as president and Iván Heinze as treasurer. Diego Barreiro became executive secretary. The new conference had about 21,000 members.76 For almost 100 years, the conference, through the sale of publications, Adventist education, medical missionary programs, and many other missionary and humanitarian projects, had pursued its mission of spreading Adventism.77

The growth in new converts and churches especially stands out. The average yearly number baptized throughout the AAC territory was 663 during 2015 to 2018.78 The conference built 30 churches during the period 2010 to 2015. Greatly concerned about the children and adolescents in its territory, ACC currently has 23 Adventurer clubs79 and 80 Pathfinder clubs enrolling young people 10 to 15 years old.80 In the area of personal ministries, the conference has 408 small groups and 1,811 missionary couples.

In short, the AAC has continued to be faithful in its mission to “proclaim to all people the everlasting gospel of God's love, in the context of the three angels messages of Revelation 14: 6-12, as it stands revealed in the life, death, resurrection, and high priestly ministry of Jesus Christ, inviting them to accept Jesus as their personal Lord and Savior, to join His remnant church and to nurture and educate believers as disciples, in preparation for His soon return.”81

Administrative Leaders82

Presidents: F. L. Perry (1921);83 J. H. Roth (1922-1924); E. H. Wilcox (1925-1926); J .H. Roth (1927-1928); J. H. Meier (1929-1931); Walter Schubert (1932-1934); H. G. Stoehr (1935); Carl Becker (1937-1943); Carl Becker (1945); Walter Schubert (1945); K. H. Tulaszweski (1946-1949); Juan Riffel (1950-1953); K. F. Noltze (1955-1958); Pablo S. Seidl (1959-1965); Manuel F. Pérez (1966-1968); Marcos E. Gutiérrez (1971); Edwin Iván Mayer (1972-1977); Juan Tabuenca (1978-1980); Orlando Ciuffardi (1981-1984); Daniel Rode (1985-1986); Juan Carlos Sicalo (1987-1989); Carlos T. Kalbermatter (1990–1993); Víctor A. Peto (1994-2000); Aníbal D. Espada (2001-2008); Fernando Müller (2009-2013); Dario M. Caviglione (2014-2017); Leónidas Ariel Meda (2017-).

Secretaries: C. E. Krieghoff (1921-1922); W. A. Ernenputsch (1923-1927); Ernesto Steger (1929); C. E. Krieghoff (1930-1936); G. E. Emmenegger (1937); Ernesto Steger (1938-1947); Pablo C. Beskow (1948-1956); Benito C. Kalbermatter (1957-1963); Hector Pontigo (1964-1968); B. A. Treiyer (1969-1973); Benjamin Reichel (1974-1978); Basilio Zawadzki (1979-1980); Daniel Rode (1981); Basilio Zawadzki (1982-1984); Ruben Reichel (1985-1987); Carlos Kalbermatter (1988-1989); Ruben Reichel (1990); Emilio Vogel (1991-1992); Raúl Pérez (1993-1997); Roberto O. Gullón (1998-2003); Jorge Luorno (2004-2008); Gabriel Cesano (2009-2010); Iván Rosales (2011-2012); Diego Barreiro (2013-2014); Juan Roberto Peralta (2015-2016); Roberto O. Gullón (2017); Juan Roberto Peralta84 (2018-2019); Alejandro Brunelli (2020- ).85

Treasurers: C. E. Krieghoff (1921-1922); W. A. Ernenputsch (1923-1927); Ernesto Steger (1929); C. E. Krieghoff (1930-1936); G. E. Emmenegger (1937); Ernesto Steger (1938-1947); Pablo C. Beskow (1948-1956); B. C. Kalbermatter (1957-1963); Hector Pontigo (1964-1968); B. A. Treiyer (1969-1973); Benjamín Reichel (1974-1978); Basilio Zawadzki (1979-1984); Rubén Reichel (1985-1990); Roberto Nestares (1991-1996); Manuel R. Lastra (1997-2005); Carlos Giménez (2006-2008); Iván E. Heinze (2009-2016); Raul Kahl (2017); Elwin Alberto Ernst (2017- ).86

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Ostuni, Daniel. “Inspiración, Consagración, Acción [Inspiration, Consecration, Action].” La Revista Adventista, February 1977.

Peverini, Héctor J. En las huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence]. Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 1988.

Plenc, Daniel O., Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Sergio Becerra. Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano (Foundational missionaries of South American Adventism). 3rd ed. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 2016.

Plenc, Daniel. “El todo y la nada: un espacio para la memoria [Everything and nothing: a space for memory].” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], Spring 2011.

Plenc, Daniel. “Hitos Educativos [Educational Milestones].” La Revista Adventista, September 2, 2016.

Portal de Publicaciones [Publications Portal]. https://www.adventistas.org/es/publicaciones/

Portal of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. https://www.adventistas.org/es/

Portal of the Pathfinders Club. https://www.adventistas.org/es/conquistadores/

“Radio Nuevo Tiempo, al servicio de los oyentes [New Time Radio, at the service of listeners].” La Revista Adventista, April 2014.

Scholtus, Silvia C. “Adventism in Argentina.” In Religions of the World. Encyclopedia of Latin American Religions, ed. Henry Gooren, Springer, Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing AG, 2019.

Scholtus, Silvia C. “Robert H. Habenicht.” In Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano [Foundational missionaries of South American Adventism]. 3rd ed. Eds. Daniel O. Plenc, Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Sergio Becerra. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 2016.

Scholtus, Silvia. “Un paseo por la historia [A walk through history].” La Revista Adventista, April 9, 2019.

Schwarz, R.W. and Floyd Greenleaf. Portadores de luz: historia de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [A Land of Hope: the Growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America]. Florida: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 2012. 

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. https://www.adventistyearbook.org

Snyder, E. W. “Conferencia General de San Gerónimo [San Jerónimo Assembly].” La Revista Adventista, May 1904.

Spalding, Arthur W. Footprints of the Pioneers. Washington, D.C: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1947.

Spalding, Arthur W. Origin and History of Seventh-day Adventist, vol. 4. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1962.

Town, N. Z. “La Conferencia Anual en la República Argentina [The Annual Meeting in the Argentine Republic].” La Revista Adventista, December 1907.

Town, N.Z. “La Conferencia Anual en la República Argentina [The Annual Meeting in the Argentine Republic]. La Revista Adventista, November 1901.

Tulaszewki, C. H. F. “Working for Our Own Children.” South American Bulletin, July-August 1948. 

Valenzuela, David. “Evangelización en la Asociación Central [Evangelization in the Central Conference].” La Revista Adventista, August 1982.

Villar, Alexis. “Comienza el ciclo lectivo en las escuelas adventistas de Argentina [The school year begins in Adventist schools in Argentina].” News - Adventists, March 6, 2017.

Webster, F. C. “Consolidation in Union Facilitates Evangelism.” ARH, July 1972.

Westphal, F. H. “Early Incidents of the Work in South America.” ARH, October 30, 1924.

Westphal, J. W. “South America.” The General Conference Bulletin, May 28, 1909.

Westphal, J. W. “The Beginnings of the Work in Argentina.” ARH, August 12, 1920.

Wilcox, E. H. “Inauguración de la Capilla de Viale, Entre Ríos [Inauguration of the Chapel in Viale, Entre Ríos].” La Revista Adventista, February 21, 1927.

Wilcox, E. H. “Inauguración de una Nueva Capilla en Felicia, Pcia. de Sta. Fe, Rep. Argentina [Inauguration of a New Chapel in Felicia, Province of St. Fe, Argentine Rep.].” La Revista Adventista, November 1, 1926.

Notes

  1. “Central Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 225.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Argentine Conference,” accessed January 10, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Nt9ROD.

  3. Alexis Villar, “Comienza el ciclo lectivo en las escuelas adventistas de Argentina [The school year begins in Adventist schools in Argentina],” News--Adventists, March 6, 2017, accessed January 13, 2020, https://bit.ly/35N0srq.

  4. Claudio M. Martín, “Colegio Secundario en Córdoba [Middle School in Córdoba],” La Revista Adventista, October 1984, 17.

  5. Dora D. de Muller, “Bodas de Oro en Viale [Golden Anniversary at Viale],” La Revista Adventista, May 1977, 17. During October 1976, the Adventist school located at Viale, Entre Ríos, celebrated its fiftieth anniversary; Ernesto J. Bernhardt, “Cincuentenario en tres localidades de Entre Ríos [Fiftieth anniversary in three towns of Entre Ríos],” La Revista Adventista, April 1980, 14, 15. In November 1979, the schools located in Colonia La Paz, Obispo Norte and Galarza, Entre Ríos, celebrated their own fiftieth anniversaries.

  6. “Central Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 226.

  7. “Radio Nuevo Tiempo, al servicio de los oyentes [New Time Radio, at the service of listeners],” La Revista Adventista, April 2014, 23; Jesús viene ¡Resplandece [Jesus is coming, shine!], Document of the II Argentine Union Conference Congress (Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos, Argentina, December 16-19, 2015), 55, 68, 69, 86. Report by Juan Roberto Peralta, received by Eugenio Di Dionisio on September 20, 2016. Available in the Central Argentine Conference Archive.

  8. Alejandro Fernández, “La ley argentina de inmigración de 1876 y su contexto histórico [The Argentine immigration law of 1876 and its historical context],” Almanack, September/December 2017, 51-85, accessed February 17, 2020, http://bit.ly/2u4KKei; Casa Rosada [Pink House], “Galería de Presidentes” [Presidents Gallery], accessed January 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2Sz6wAj.

  9. David P. Gullón, “El comienzo de la obra adventista en Argentina [The beginning of Adventist work in Argentina],” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], October 1977, 5, 10, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NPZLYe.

  10. J. W. Westphal, “The Beginnings of the Work in Argentina,” ARH, August 12, 1920, 6, accessed January 29, 2020, http://bit.ly/2uEXacW.

  11. Véase Sergio Becerra, “Geörg (Jorge) Riffel,” in Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano (Foundational missionaries of South American Adventism). 3rd ed., eds. Daniel O. Plenc, Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Sergio Becerra (Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 2016), 11-22; Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America,” (Ph.D. diss,, University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 1, 43; See the chapter on the beginnings of the work in South America in Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence] (Florida, Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 1988); R. W. Schwarz and Floyd Greenleaf, Portadores de luz: historia de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [A Land of Hope: the Growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Florida: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 2012), 221.

  12. Idem.; Reinaldo Hetze, “Cómo empezó la obra en Entre Ríos [How the work began in Entre Ríos],” La Revista Adventista, January 30, 1933, 16.

  13. David P. Gullón, “El comienzo de la obra adventista en Argentina [The beginning of Adventist work in Argentina],” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], October 1977, 11, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NPZLYe.

  14. See the chapter on the spread of Adventism in Argentina in Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence] (Florida, Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 1988).

  15. A literature evangelist of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is one who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the church, to transmit to his fellow-men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being,” consulted on January 21, 2020;, for more information visit the website: http://bit.ly/37I7sGQ.

  16. “The General Conference coordinates the world ministry of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and it is an agency established under the truth that no man should be governed by the judgment of another, and that any decision must be made by an assembly. The General Conference is responsible for the spiritual and development plans of the church in the world”; Adventist, “Iglesia Mundial, Conferencia General” [World Church, General Conference], accessed February 23, 2020, http://bit.ly/3a2atmP.

  17. Silvia Scholtus, “Un paseo por la historia [A walk through history],” La Revista Adventista, April 9, 2019, accessed January 21, 2020, http://bit.ly/3bYkbsh.

  18. See the chapter on the spread of Adventism in Argentina in Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence] (Florida, Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 1988).

  19. David P. Gullón, “El comienzo de la obra adventista en Argentina [The beginning of Adventist work in Argentina],” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], October 1977, 7, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NPZLYe.

  20. F. H. Westphal, “Early Incidents of the Work in South America,” ARH, October 30, 1924), 18, accessed February 10, 2020, http://bit.ly/2SyIeGt.

  21. Daniel O. Plenc, Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Sergio Becerra, Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano [Foundational missionaries of South American Adventism], 3rd ed., (Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 2016), 11-22; D. O. Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: Pioneros del Adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: Pioneers of Adventism in Latin America] (Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 2008), 17; See also the chapter on the spread of Adventism in Argentina in Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence] (Florida, Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 1988).

  22. Daniel Plenc, “El todo y la nada: un espacio para la memoria [Everything and nothing: a space for memory],” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], Spring 2011, 106, 107, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RBKRG6.

  23. David P. Gullón, “El comienzo de la obra adventista en Argentina [The beginning of Adventist work in Argentina],” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], October 1977, 11, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NPZLYe; Héctor J. Peverini, En las huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence] (Florida, Buenos Aires: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 1988), 237; Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America,” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 1, 71.

  24. Brown, 37-40, 76, 89.

  25. Roberto Gullón Canedo, Historia de la Estructura Organizacional de la División Sudamericana [History of the Organizational Structure of the South American Division] (South American Division, Brasilia, Brazil, 2008), 10. This document is available in the CHA Archives of the Ellen G. White Research Center, River Plate Adventist University, Entre Ríos, Argentina.

  26. Juan McCarthy, “Eco de Misiones [Echo of Missions],” La Revista Adventista, supplement, February 1905, 3, 4.

  27. Daniel Plenc, “Hitos Educativos [Educational Milestones],” La Revista Adventista, September 2, 2016, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2tuZ9jT.

  28. Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 1, 71.

  29. Daniel Plenc, “Hitos Educativos [Educational Milestones],” La Revista Adventista, September 2, 2016, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2tuZ9jT; Daniel Plenc, “El todo y la nada: un espacio para la memoria [Everything and nothing: a space for memory],” Revista Enfoques [On focus Review], Spring 2011, 108, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RBKRG6.

  30. Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 787, in which he cites as source “Diversas [Various],” El Faro [The Lighthouse], November 1902, 176.

  31. Silvia C. Scholtus, “Adventism in Argentina,” in Religions of the World. Encyclopedia of Latin American Religions, ed. Henry Gooren (Springer, Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing AG, 2019), 1-6, available in: http://bit.ly/38FfYb2.

  32. Silvia C. Scholtus, “Robert H. Habenicht,” in Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano [Foundational missionaries of South American Adventism]. 3rd ed., eds. Daniel O. Plenc, Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Sergio Becerra (Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 2016), 59-84.

  33. David P. Gullón, “El comienzo de la obra adventista en Argentina [The beginning of Adventist work in Argentina],” Revista Enfoques [On Focus Review], October 1977, 20, 21, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NPZLYe.

  34. “Notas Misioneras” [Missionary Notes], El Faro [The Lighthouse], October 1903, 153; “Notas Misioneras” [Missionary Notes], El Faro [The Lighthouse], December 1903, 185, documents cited in Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America,” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 787.

  35. Ibid., 3: 785-786; E. W. Snyder, “Conferencia General de San Gerónimo [San Jerónimo Assembly], La Revista Adventista, May 1904, 1.

  36. N. Z., Town, “La Conferencia Anual en la República Argentina [The annual meeting in the Argentine Republic],” La Revista Adventista, (November 1901, 5.

  37. Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America,” Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953, vol. 3, 792.

  38. Ibid., 793.

  39. Ibid.

  40. Ibid., 796.

  41. Ibid., 397, 398.

  42. N.Z., Town, “La Conferencia Anual en la República Argentina [The annual meeting in the Argentine Republic],” La Revista Adventista, December 1907, 4; J.W. Westphal, “South America,” The General Conference Bulletin, May 28, 1909, 197, accessed February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HCxiBH; Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 798.

  43. Ibid., 801.

  44. Ibid., 808.

  45. Ibid., 804-806.

  46. The Austral Union Conference of the Adventist Church was an administrative unit organized during February 1906 in the city of La Plata, Argentina, to serve the territories of Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay. The administrative headquarters was established in Buenos Aires. Its existence lasted until August 3, 2009, ending with the creation of the Argentine Union Conference, officially recognized at the 59th session of the Seventh-day Adventist General Conference in 2010 at Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Religious freedom, “Historia de los Adventistas en la Argentina [Adventist History in Argentina],” accessed January 13, 2020, https://bit.ly/2tf7HuL; Adventist Archives, “General Conference Sessions,” accessed January 13, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RgIp7J.

  47. “Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 119, accessed January 13, 2020, https://bit.ly/2tRCU7x.

  48. “Elder G. B. Thompson…” General Conference Bulletins May 20, 1922: 180, accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Rmb0bU; Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 810-813.

  49. General Conference Committee Minutes, no. 1898, September 19, 1921, 1173, accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Ns62ch.

  50. Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 813, 814.

  51. Ibid., 814.

  52. Adventist Statistics, “N. Argentine Conference (1921-1928),” accessed February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/37Hs1U0.

  53. “North Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 124, accessed January 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/2sv1pHg.

  54. Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 817.

  55. Ibid., 817, 818.

  56. E. H. Wilcox, “Inauguración de una Nueva Capilla en Felicia, Pcia. de Sta. Fe, Rep. Argentina [Inauguration of a New Chapel in Felicia, Province of St. Fe, Argentine Rep.],” La Revista Adventista, November 1, 1926, 7, 8; E. H. Wilcox, “Inauguración de la Capilla de Viale, Entre Ríos [Inauguration of the Chapel in Viale, Entre Ríos],” La Revista Adventista, February 21, 1927, 10, 11.

  57. “North Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1930), 229, accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/375bZ6A.

  58. R. R. Breitigam, “North Argentine Conference Session,” South American Bulletin, November 1930, 7, 8, accessed January 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/388NsxJ.

  59. “Northwestern Argentine Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1932), 237, accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/30qLTsn.

  60. E. L. Maxwell, “Austral Union Notes,” South American Bulletin, June 1929, 5, accessed January 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/35URUyJ.

  61. “Central Argentina Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1932), 235, accessed January 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/360g76J.

  62. “Notas del Congreso Bienal” [Biennial Congress Notes], La Revista Adventista, November 10, 1930, 8.

  63. J. L. Brown, “Cordoba,” South American Bulletin, April 1936, 3, accessed January 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/36cIQW6.

  64. J. L. Brown, “Notes from Central Argentine,” South American Bulletin, March 1936, 7, 8, accessed January 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/2R8zl5Z.

  65. Carlos Becker, “Dedicación del Nuevo Templo de la ciudad de Santa Fe [Dedication of the New Temple in the city of Santa Fe],” La Revista Adventista, May 27, 1940, 11; Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 824.

  66. Ibid., 823.

  67. Ibid., 825.

  68. Daniel Feder, “Dedicación del Nuevo Templo de Ramírez, Entre Ríos [Dedication of the New Temple at Ramírez, Entre Ríos], La Revista Adventista, September 15, 1941, 13; E. N. Lugenbeal, “El Cincuentenario de la Iglesia de Crespo [The fiftieth anniversary of the Crespo Church], La Revista Adventista, April 16, 1945, 11, 12.

  69. Walton John Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America” (Ph.D. diss., University of Southern California, 1953), vol. 3, 829; C.H.F. Tulaszewki, “Working for Our Own Children,” South American Bulletin, July-August 1948, 6, accessed January 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/2v2kUrn; G. C. Faas, “Anniversary Service in Viale, Entre Ríos,” South American Bulletin, July-August 1956, 2, accessed January 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/3as290W.

  70. J. G. Clouzet, “The 41st. Central Argentine Conference Session,” South American Bulletin, April-June 1961, 2, 3, accessed January 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/3bTqP2Z.

  71. “Central Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1973-1974), 224, accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Nrn5eJ.

  72. F. C. Webster, “Consolidation in Union Facilitates Evangelism,” ARH (July 1972), 16, accessed January 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RjUrgr; Carlos A. Marsollier, “La obra avanza en la Asociación Central [The work advances in the Central Conference],” La Revista Adventista, March 1976, 17, 18; Daniel Ostuni, “Inspiración, Consagración, Acción [Inspiration, Consecration, Action],” La Revista Adventista, February 1977, 15, 16; Carlos A. Marsollier, “Noticias de la Central Argentine Conference [News from the Central Argentine Conference],” La Revista Adventista, July 1977, 15, 16.

  73. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Argentine Conference,” accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NqyfQB; Carlos A. Marsollier, “A cincuenta años de la inauguración del templo de Felicia [Fifty years after the inauguration of the Felicia temple], La Revista Adventista, January 1977, 15.

  74. Aníbal Espada, “Congreso de la Asociación Central [Central Conference Congress],” La Revista Adventista, June 1981, 16; David Valenzuela, “Evangelización en la Asociación Central [Evangelization in the Central Conference], La Revista Adventista, August 1982, 14; Aníbal D. Espada, “51° Congreso de la Asociación Argentina Central [51st Congress of the Central Argentine Conference],” La Revista Adventista, April 1984, 15.

  75. In November 2012, the plenary meeting of the Argentine Union Conference appointed the administrators for the MACO: Ivan Rosales, president; Juan Peralta, secretary; Elwin Ernst, treasurer; Seventh-day Adventist Church - Central Argentine Conference, Facebook post, November 19, 2012, accessed January 17, 2020, http://bit.ly/2TaMNGa.

  76. “Central Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2014), 260, accessed January 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2FUgFjX.

  77. Jorge Figueroa, “Colportores en plena actividad [Canvassers in full activity], En Marcha, April 2009, 1; “Gran impacto misionero en Rosario [Great missionary impact in Rosario],” La Revista Adventista, November 2010, 22; “Nueve pastores fueron ordenados en la primera iglesia adventista de Sudamérica [Nine pastors were ordained in the first South American Adventist Church], La Revista Adventista, March 2012, 20.

  78. Adventist Statistics, “Central Argentine Conference (2010-Present),” accessed February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2VcvIOL.

  79. “The Adventurers Club is a program for children from 6 to 9 years old, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the USA, in 1972. [...] In 1991, the General Conference authorized it as a world program, establishing its objectives.” Seventh-day Adventist Church portal, “Historia” [History], accessed February 27, 2020, http://bit.ly/2PwNatP.

  80. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet, in general, once a week to learn to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” Such young people “are thrilled with outdoor activities as camping, hiking, climbing, exploring the woods and caves. [...] It is worth mentioning their knowledge of outdoor survival in places that are not easily accessible. They know how to cook outdoors, light a fire without matches, among others.” Besides, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awakened by manual arts, and fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Seventh-day Adventist Church portal, “¿Quiénes son los Conquistadores?” [Who are the Pathfinders?], accessed on February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2TpEBBY.

  81. Mission Statement of the Seventh-day Adventist Church,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 11, accessed January 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NvG9s2.

  82. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Argentine Conference,” accessed February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HMLN5H; “North Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 122; “Central Argentine Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 225. To verify in more detail about all presidents, secretaries and treasurers in the ACC history, consult the Yearbooks from 1922 to 2019.

  83. General Conference Committee Minutes, no. 1898, September 19, 1921: 1173, accessed January 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Ns62ch; “Argentina, South America,” ARH, February 19, 1920, 21, accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2tDMD1l.

  84. Juan Peralta, better known as David, received an invitation to serve as president of the Northwestern Argentine Mission based in the city of Tucumán. Central Argentine Conference, Twitter posts, January 20, 2020 (9:47 a.m.), accessed January 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/37HjvUY.

  85. Alejandro Brunelli has been appointed as executive secretary and director of the AAC Global Mission. Central Argentine Conference, Twitter posts, January 22, 2020 (2:56 a.m.), accessed January 21, 2020, http://bit.ly/2VbNvWs.

  86. More information about the AAC can be found on the website: www.aac.adventistas.org, or in social media – Facebook: @aacentral, Instagram: @asociacioncentral, Twitter: @AdventistasAAC, Youtube: Asociacion Argentina Central IASD [SDA Central Argentine Conference].

×

Shapiama, Angel Jesús Torrel, Eugenio Di Dionisio, Silvia C. Scholtus. "Central Argentine Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. May 28, 2021. Accessed August 04, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FGDH.

Shapiama, Angel Jesús Torrel, Eugenio Di Dionisio, Silvia C. Scholtus. "Central Argentine Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. May 28, 2021. Date of access August 04, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FGDH.

Shapiama, Angel Jesús Torrel, Eugenio Di Dionisio, Silvia C. Scholtus (2021, May 28). Central Argentine Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved August 04, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FGDH.