Uruguay Union of Churches Mission

By Adilson da Silva Vieira, and Fabián Marcos

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Adilson da Silva Vieira

Fabián Marcos

The Uruguay Union of Churches Mission (Unión Misión Uruguaya or UU) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church within the territory of the South American Division. This institution takes care of Adventist work in the Eastern Republic of Uruguay. It is headquartered on 3452 Agraciada avenue, Zip Code: 11700, in the city and Department of Montevideo, Eastern Republic of Uruguay.1

Territory and Statistics

Its area of activity corresponds geographically to the territory of all Uruguay, with 177,414 km² of surface. The estimated population of this country is 3,519,000 inhabitants. The UU manages 113 congregations, with 60 organized churches and 53 groups. The number of Adventist members in Uruguay is 7,373 people. That is, throughout the Uruguayan territory there is an average of one Adventist per 477 inhabitants, which represents approximately 0.21 percent of the country's total population.2

In the UU territory there are six elementary schools and two high schools. The elementary schools are: Colegio Adventista Barros Blancos (Barros Blancos Adventist Academy), located on Ruta 8 km 24, in Barros Blancos, Department of Canelones, with 117 students;3 Colegio Adventista Del Prado (Del Prado Adventist Academy), located on 4420 Santa Lucía, Montevideo, with 78 students;4 Colegio Adventista Las Acacias (Las Acacias Adventist Academy), located on 3630 Ingeniero José Serrato street, also in Montevideo, with 220 students;5 Colegio Adventista Nueva Helvecia (Nueva Helvecia Adventist Academy), located on 1539 Federico Gilomén, Nueva Helvecia, Department of Colonia, with 32 students;6 Colegio Adventista Paysandú (Paysandú Adventist Academy), located on 1176 Uruguay, in Paysandú, with 68 students;7 and Escuela Joaquín Suárez (Joaquín Suárez School) of Instituto Adventista del Uruguay (Uruguay Adventist Academy or IAU), located in the IAU facilities, in Progreso, with 108 students.8

The educational centers that offer high school education are: Instituto Adventista del Uruguay (Uruguay Adventist Academy – IAU) and Liceo Adventista de Montevideo (Montevideo Adventist Academy – LAM). The IAU is located on Ruta 5 km 33,5, in Progreso, Department of Canelones. This is a boarding school that provides early childhood, elementary, and high school education. The IAU serves 176 students in high school. Montevideo Adventist Academy serves 191 students and is located on 2826 Luis Alberto de Herrera avenue, La Blanqueada, in Montevideo. Adventist education in Uruguay currently serves a total of 990 students through 161 employees, of whom 128 are teachers.9

In the area of communication, the UU maintains the Radio Nuevo Tiempo Uruguay (Uruguay New Time Radio), which operates in two cities. In Montevideo, the programs with messages of hope that announce the return of Jesus are broadcast through Radio Nuevo Tiempo Montevideo (Montevideo New Time Radio – FM 101.3). This radio station operates in the same building as the Uruguay Union.10 Another broadcaster of hope is the Radio Nuevo Tiempo Maldonado (Maldonado New Time Radio – FM 97.5), located on 530 Ituzaingó street, Downtown, Maldonado.11

In the social area, the Adventist institution responsible for providing assistance in the country is ADRA Uruguay. It is headquartered on 2311 Mateo Vidal, Montevideo. This agency promotes several actions through projects that seek to help people in poverty and distress.12 Since its establishment, ADRA Uruguay has benefited more than thirty thousand people with humanitarian assistance.13

The total number of servers of the Adventist Church in the mission field of Uruguay Union Mission is 244 people. Among these employees there are 25 pastors with ministerial credential, 5 pastors with a ministerial license, 8 workers with a missionary credential, and 1 worker with a missionary license. The other servers work in operational and administrative functions in the many church institutions in Uruguay already mentioned.14

The Union Organizational History

As in other South American countries, the Adventist message reached Uruguay thanks to the publishing ministry. On December 10, 1891, the first three missionary canvassers15 arrived in Montevideo. These were Elwin Snyder, Clair Nowlin, and Albert Stauffer.16 Although their plans were to settle in that locality, these men stayed only for 24 hours in the country. That happened because, after a brief field study, they realized that the small number of English-speaking people in the city would hinder the work they intended to do. Thus, the three canvassers went to Buenos Aires, Argentina.17

Upon arriving in Argentina, Snyder, Nowlin, and Stauffer dedicated themselves to spreading Adventist literature in that country. Although they were more fluent in English, their goal was to reach all people, including Spanish-speaking people. However, there were some obstacles, since apart from the fact that those men did not speak Spanish, their books were written in English, French, and German.18 Accordingly, later, while Nowlin and Snyder canvassed in Buenos Aires, Stauffer (who was fluent both in German and English) went to visit the German and French speaking settlers in the provinces of Santa Fe and Entre Ríos. Around 1892 Albert Stauffer returned to Uruguay.19 While there he carried out his first missionary activities in the Swiss-German colony of Nueva Helvecia, in southwestern Uruguay. Thus, Stauffer became the first missionary to convey the Adventist message through literature in the Uruguayan lands.20

Later, toward the end of July or beginning of August 1895, Pastor Frank H. Westphal arrived in Uruguay. There Westphal held the first Adventist evangelistic meetings in the vicinity of that colony of Nueva Helvecia. As a result of the meetings, 35 people became interested in the Adventist faith. And, at the end of the following year, Westphal performed the first baptism ceremony in the country, baptizing 18 people in Nova Helvecia. On that same day, he organized the first Adventist church in Uruguay, the Adventist church of Nueva Helvecia.21

At the beginning of the 20th century, the church administrative unit responsible for the development of Adventist work in the Uruguayan, Paraguayan, and Argentine territories was Asociación del Río de la Plata (River Plate Conference – presently called Asociación Bonaerense – Buenos Aires Conference). At that time the institution was headquartered in Buenos Aires, approximately 900 km away from Montevideo. In April 1901, during the 34th Congress of the SDA General Conference, church leaders decided to create the Unión Misión Sudamericana (South American Union Mission–presently named Unión Argentina–Argentina Union Conference). On that same occasion, Joseph W. Westphal, Frank Westphal's younger brother, was appointed as the first superintendent of this institution.22

Later, in 1906, the South America Union Mission held a congress in the city of Paraná, capital of the province of Entre Ríos, Argentina. This meeting took place within March 15 and 25 of that year, with delegates from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and other South American countries. During that meeting on March 19, the delegates approved a vote authorizing a change in the status of the South America Union Mission, which came to be called Unión Asociación Sudamericana (South American Union Conference).23 Among other observations, the need to reorganize the South American Union Conference territory was also done at that congress. Thus, on March 21, 1906, the River Plate Conference mission field was reconfigured and the Misión Uruguaya (Uruguay Mission–MU) was established.24

At that same meeting, Pastor John McCarthy was appointed as the first president of Uruguay Mission, and Pastor N. Z. Town was appointed secretary-treasurer to help in the direction of the administrative unit. When he took office, Pastor McCarthy commented that there were 48 Adventists in Uruguay and that “their generosity caught his attention, since they had given 1,120 gold pesos in offerings.” The main reason for the establishment of Uruguay Mission was the need to better serve the mission fields that were beginning to grow in South America. Initially Uruguay Mission was headquartered in Buenos Aires, Argentina.25 And at the end of the first year after its organization, this mission had 60 Sabbath keepers and two organized churches throughout the country. The average was one Adventist per 16,300 inhabitants.26

In 1909 the MU administrative headquarters was transferred to the city of Nueva Palmira, Department of Colonia, Uruguay. This was the first headquarters of the mission established in Uruguayan lands, remaining in this same location until 1911 when it was transferred to the city of Mercedes, Department of Soriano, on 591 Cololó.27 Later, in 1912, Pastor F. L. Perry organized a new church in Montevideo after having held some evangelistic meetings in that city.28 In the following year, the church in Uruguay bought a building on 2535 Arenal Grande street and transferred the MU administrative headquarters to Montevideo, where it remained for many years.29

Later, during the 1930s, radio became an important ally in advancing Adventist preaching in Uruguay. In 1936, for example, Pastor Pedro Brouchy, while carrying out a series of evangelistic meetings in Uruguayan lands, began to broadcast his sermons on the radio. The broadcasts reached especially those people who could not find space in the auditorium where the meetings were held. Since then preaching through communication systems has developed a lot, helping to draw new interested people for the church.30

In the following years, Adventist membership continued to grow in the Uruguayan territory, and new temples were built. In 1940 the temple of Montevideo SDA Central Church was inaugurated at 2360 Italia avenue. That same year the Uruguay Mission headquarters was transferred to the premises of that church in Montevideo.31 Until the end of that year, it was recorded that 103 people were baptized and the Adventist church in Uruguay had more than a thousand members. At that time there were 13 organized Adventist churches throughout the Uruguayan territory.32

Another significant milestone in the preaching of the gospel through the radio took place within 1942 and 1943, when the evangelistic meetings of Pastor Henry Westphal (son of Frank Westphal) also began to be broadcast by a group of nine Uruguayan radios. In 1942 one of the stations that broadcast Pastor Westphal's programs was one of the most powerful in the continent, with such a wide reach that it covered Australia, Europe, and the Philippines. In addition to this, similar advances occurred in April of that same year, when “the Mission organized half-hour programs every Sunday night.”33

In the following year, with Henry Westphal taking over the program “La Voz de la Profecía” (The Voice of Prophecy),34 Bible study lessons were mailed to interested listeners. These lessons were corrected by a team of volunteers in Montevideo, and the names of each of the interested people were written down. In this way canvassers and other workers could easily find those interested in order to present biblical truth to them. “In mid-1943 Westphal reported that the baptisms were already the result of the radio Bible school.” Thus, preaching through the media proved to be an efficient resource.35

Meanwhile, still in 1943, Adventist education took an important step in the country. In that year the first Adventist teaching institute was established in that locality–the “Instituto Adventista del Uruguay” (Uruguay Adventist Academy). This institution was organized on October 4, 1943, when 100 acres of land (404,686 m2) were purchased in the city of Progreso,36 about thirty km north of Montevideo. The location was good and buses from the capital passed by in short-time intervals (less than an hour). Thus, it was possible to travel easily from the main city of the country to the Adventist campus.37 From then on Adventist education experienced great growth in Uruguay. In the following decade, the IAU reached the mark of 120 enrolled students. Furthermore, at the same time, Uruguay already had 10 other Adventist schools, serving a total of 220 students.38

Later, in the 1960s, the church in Uruguay was further strengthened through the development of education and the youth department. In 1961 the first Club de Conquistadores (Pathfinders Club) in Uruguay was founded in the church of the IAU campus.39 A few years later, in 1964, the first camporee40 was held in those lands. This event, which marked the beginning of this ministry in the country, took place “in La Republicana park, with other clubs that were also starting their activities, such as Las Acacias and Central de Montevideo.”41 In regard to education, it was also in that year of 1964 that Las Acacias Adventist Academy was established in the city of Montevideo.42

In order to enhance the assistance work in the Uruguayan lands, the church decided to organize an institution especially dedicated to this service in that country. This took place on June 19, 1965, when ADRA Uruguay was established under the name Obra Filantrópica de Asistencia Social Adventista–OFASA–Seventh-day Adventist Welfare Service (S.A.W.S).43 Since its creation its offices have been located at the MU headquarters. Little more than a decade later, in 1976, the Uruguay Mission headquarters moved to 3211 Mateo Vidal street, Montevideo. At that time, about thirty-five years had already passed since the MU headquarters was established in the Uruguayan capital to administer the work from there. The Adventist work had advanced significantly in that country, and there were already 23 organized churches and 3,911 Adventists in Uruguay.44

With the purpose of carrying on the gospel in the 1980s, the Adventist church in South America invested heavily in public evangelism campaigns. These initiatives brought good results, which could be seen through the growth in the number of members. However, when those initiatives were carried out in the territory of the Unión Austral (Austral Union Conference–presently called Unión Argentina–Argentina Union Conference), which comprised the countries of Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay, these campaigns did not obtain such satisfactory results. Thus, faced with difficulties, the church administrators made an evaluation, looking for ways to reverse the situation. Based on the evaluation, the Uruguayan Mission leaders were able to make new plans, and, in this way, better results have been achieved in public evangelism since then.45

In 1985 the MU allocated an office in its headquarters for the operation of a bookstore, which became known as “Librería Adventista” (Adventist Bookstore–presently known as Librería del Servicio Educacional Hogar y Salud–Uruguay–Home and Health Educational Service Bookstore–Uruguay). Since then this bookstore has contributed to the canvassing work46 and with the distribution of denominational material.47 In 1985 camp facilities were built on the mission territory. This was an achievement that contributed to the development of many Adventist youth in Uruguay. The realization of this project was possible due to the fundraising that young people from all over Austral Union Conference carried out every Sabbath of that year. When the fundraising period ended, the Austral Union Conference not only gave the Uruguay Mission the sum of approximately U.S. $10,800.00, but also managed to pass on this same aid to the Paraguay Adventist church.48

Later, in 1992, as part of its evangelization plan in the big cities, the MU held a great series of meetings in the city of Montevideo. This initiative was called “Metro Montevideo” (Montevideo Subway). On that occasion six simultaneous meetings were held in different neighborhoods. As a result, many people accepted Jesus and joined the Adventist denomination, resulting in an increase in membership in the country.49 In that same year, four years after the centenary of the Adventist Church in Uruguay, there were about six thousand five hundred seven members linked to the mission, distributed in 36 organized churches in the territory.50 Later, in 1996, within the framework of the celebration of 100 years of Adventism in Uruguay, the Uruguayan Post Office (National Postal Network) produced a commemorative postage stamp in recognition of the work carried out by the Adventist denomination in the country.51

At the beginning of the 21st century, in order to make the Adventist message reach homes more easily and around the capital, the MU leaders purchased a radio station in Montevideo. Consequently, the churches in Montevideo and surrounding areas, which were reached by the signal, were happy with the arrival of many radio listeners who requested Bible studies and, later, gave their lives to Jesus. Later, in 2002, the church acquired a radio station in the city of Maldonado, which was linked to the Red Nuevo Tiempo (Adventist Media Center). However over time, the Radio Nuevo Tiempo (New Time Radio) stations in Montevideo and Maldonado began to broadcast their own local programming.52

In 2008 the membership of the Uruguay Mission rose to 6,955 Adventists, distributed in 82 congregations throughout the country. That is, since the beginning of the new millennium, the mission had grown by almost 30 percent.53 This was the fruit of God's blessings on the work done by all ADVENTIST leaders and members in Uruguay, who were strongly involved in the preaching of the gospel. In view of this growth and with the purpose of giving better attention to the development of the Adventist work in Uruguay, the SAD decided to request a survey to the General Conference for reorganizing the Austral Union Conference territory. That request, which as proposed would lead to the establishment of two church unions in Uruguay and Paraguay, was evaluated at a meeting of the Board of Directors of the South American Division, held on April 23, 2009. With this reconfiguration, Uruguay would become a Union directly linked to the SAD.54

Thus, within November 8 and 12, 2009, the SAD leaders, meeting in the city of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, elected the new church leaders in Uruguay. Pastor Heriberto Peter was appointed as president, and Pastors Roberto Pinto and Carlos Biaggi were elected as secretary and treasurer, respectively.55 On January 1, 2010, the Unión Misión de Iglesias de Uruguay (Uruguay Union of Churches Mission) was officially established under the legal name of Asociación Uruguaya de los Adventistas del Séptimo Día (Uruguay Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists).56 At that time there were 6,981 Adventist members and 49 organized Adventist churches throughout the Uruguayan territory. After this reconfiguration, Uruguay Adventist Academy and Radio La Voz de la Esperanza–Uruguay–The Voice of Hope Radio–Uruguay were under the responsibility of the UU.57

In 2010 goals were set for the development of the new Uruguay Union. One of them was “to establish ten churches in places with no Adventist presence, which would be something historic in the country at that time.” In harmony with this, the union's motto on this occasion was “Plantar iglesias, Romper paradigmas” (Planting Churches, Breaking Paradigms).58 In a short while, the first achievements resulting from the Adventist work in Uruguay were seen. In 2012 at least two Uruguayan cities of global mission59 already had an Adventist presence. In one of them, “Paso de los Toros, with 13,000 inhabitants, a temple was built, and 22 people were baptized.” And the other city reached was Rio Branco, where “21 people were baptized and a temple was inaugurated in record time: 15 days.”60

Regarding Adventist education, at the end of 2012 the UU, with the goal of expanding the Network of Adventist Schools in the country, bought property in the Uruguayan capital to establish the “Liceo Adventista de Montevideo” (Montevideo Adventist Academy).61 Thus, by the middle of the following year, Uruguay Union already served approximately eight hundred students, through a team of 100 teachers and 50 employees, and founded another high school. The establishment of LAM, in the capital, made it possible for high-school students to have easier access to Adventist education.62

Thus, Adventist work continued growing in Uruguay. In 2014, in addition to other projects, the UU promoted the preaching of the message through 14 radio stations, 4 local radio programs, 3 support centers, and 498 missionary mailmen (volunteers who deliver Bible study materials to people who have expressed interest through the radio or local churches). At that time there were 2,495 Bible students under the care of Red Nuevo Tiempo (Adventist Media Center). There were 919 students in the six schools in the missionary territory of the union. The publishing department had 85 canvassers who had broken the sales record until then, reaching approximately US $316,925.00. Through the “Impacto Esperanza” (Hope Impact) project63 the church had already distributed, up to August of that year, about twenty thousand missionary books.64 Furthermore, during that whole year, 350 people joined the Adventist faith throughout the Uruguayan territory. Thus, the church had 8,233 members organized in 88 congregations.65

The following year (2015), the UU administrative head office moved to a new area on 3452 Agraciada avenue, Montevideo, where it remains until the present day.66 In that same year, within April 10 and 12, the first meeting of the Pathfinders Club leaders took place, organized by the UU youth department. This event aimed at fostering mission and evangelization among children and adolescents who were members of the club. The program was supported by the SAD, which was represented by the leader of the pathfinders and adventurers of South America.67

Another important missionary front in the Uruguayan Union territory is the publishing work. In addition to having actively participated in the early history of Adventism in Uruguay, this evangelistic branch has been present throughout the history of the church in Uruguay. On March 30, 2016, the South American Spanish Publishing House delivered the “Librería Adventista” (Adventist Bookstore) to the administration of the Uruguay Union.68 This bookstore and the canvassers bear the main responsibility for the dissemination of several types of church literature in the Uruguayan territory. Within 2015 and 2019, the UU had 423 active canvassers in its territory. During that period these effective canvassers, together with student canvassers, visited more than one hundred thousand Uruguayan homes. Through dozens of grants, canvassing work has also helped many students start and pay for their studies. Now the bookstore has its own space at the union headquarters and is open to the public at large.69

Still on the issue of evangelism through publications, in 2016 the president of the Republic of Uruguay received from a pastor and a church elder the book “El Deseado de Todos los Gentes” (The Desire of Ages). On this occasion the Uruguayan Minister of Health was also present, and he got to know the plans and programs that the Adventist church develops in the health area. During the meeting government officials expressed their admiration “for the health work that the Adventist Church has done in the country.”70

Adventist youth have also actively participated in missionary activities developed in Uruguay. In the city of Dolores, the Adventist church stands out as “being mostly composed of children.” Such an example is interesting, not only because of the actions of the children but because this church “has been formed in a country where the birth rate is among the lowest in the world.”71 In this context, the UU has also worked with the “Club de Aventureros” (Adventurers Club)72 and the Pathfinders Club throughout the country. Through these programs the church has sought to disciple children and adolescents, so that they learn about the love of God and how to be relevant in the community. Today, throughout the Uruguayan territory, there are 26 Adventurers clubs and more than three hundred children who participate in the activities. There are also 709 pathfinders, distributed in 35 clubs throughout the country.73

After overcoming many challenges over the years, Uruguay Union reached 2019 with very expressive results. In that year the “Escuela Sabática” (Sabbath School) department managed to subscribe 63.8 percent of the church members, and the number of participants in the “Primero Dios” (God First])project74 reached the mark of 2,727 people. In addition, with the real growth in membership, 23 new congregations were established in the last five years, of which six have already become organized churches.75

One of the great goals of the Union for the coming years is to further foster the engagement of members in the mission through daily communion with God and relationship with others. As one of the actions to achieve this result, until November 2019, 180 “GPs My Style” (My Style Small Groups) were organized in the union territory. This project was planned to mobilize and involve youth in mission. The GP My Style is based on the proposal of Small Groups,76 where participants study the word of God and create ties of friendship.77

The growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay has not been easy throughout its history. The ecclesiastical administration and the believers of that region faced many challenges. Nonetheless, these challenges were overcome through their faith in God. But there is still much to be done. There are many people who need to be reached by the gospel. However, the members and leaders of this church administrative unit remain certain that the same God who provided the achievements in the past will continue to care for his church until His soon return.

Chronology of Administrative Leaders78

Presidents: John McCarthy (1906); J. V. Maas (1907–1910); F. L. Perry (1911–1915); J. W. Westphal (1916–1919); A. R. Sherman (1920–1922); C. E. Krieghoff (1923–1930); Ner Soto (1931–1934); Pedro M. Brouchy (1935–1941); H. Westphal (1942, 1943); C. Becker (1944); E. Lugenbeal (1945); N. Wensell (1946, 1947); Juan Riffel (1948, 1950); A. Bellido (1950–1952); Ner Soto (1953); Mario Rasi (1953); Samuel Weber (1954–1958); Benoní Cayrus (1958–1960); A. E. Collins (1961–1964); Gastón Clouzet (1965, 1966); S. Fernández (1967–1969); Humberto Caïrus (1970, 1971); José Tabuenca (1971, 1972); Charles Griffin (1973, 1974); Juan Tabuenca (1974–1977); Orlando Ciuffardi (1978–1980); Carlos Mayer (1981–1985); Eduardo Cayrus (1986–1995); Oscar Wasiuk (1995–2003); Horacio Cayrus (2004– 2008); Daniel De Brun (2008); Heriberto Peter (2010, 2011); Carlos Sánchez (2011–2019); Jorge Wiebusch Martins (2020–Present).

Secretaries: N. Z. Town (1906); Arthur Fulton (1907, 1908); G. E. Hartman (1909–1911); F. L. Perry (1912, 1913); J. T. Thompson (1914–1918); G. E. Hartman (1919, 1920); J. Weiss (1921, 1922); C. E. Krieghoff (1923, 1924); Ner Soto (1925–1930); S. Peris (1931, 1932); D. J. Weiss (1933–1943); S. Alberro (1944–1947); J. Zevallos (1948–1950); Andrés Rode (1950–1954); Orlando Cesán (1955–1961); Héctor Soto (1961–1963); Tito Weiss (1964, 1965); G. Vergan (1966–1971); E. Gordienko (1972–1975); Roberto Mato (1976–1981); G. Biaggi (1982–1984); R. Nestares (1984–1988); Alfredo Hengen (1989, 1990); Haroldo Martigani (1991–1996); David Noel Gutiérrez (1997–2006); Alberto Jesús Lencinas (2007–2009); Roberto Pinto (2010, 2011); Alfredo R. Hengen Lattar (2012–2014); Jim Galvão Soares (2015); Evaldino J. Almeida Ramos (2016–Present).

Treasurers: N. Z. Town (1906); Arthur Fulton (1907, 1908); G. E. Hartman (1909–1911); F. L. Perry (1912, 1913); J. T. Thompson (1914–1918); G. E. Hartman (1919, 1920); J. Weiss (1921, 1922); C. E. Krieghoff (1923, 1924); Ner Soto (1925–1930); S. Peris (1931, 1932); D. J. Weiss (1933–1943); S. Alberro (1944–1947); J. Zevallos (1948–1950); Andrés Rode (1950–1954); Orlado Cesán (1955–1961); Héctor Soto (1961–1963); Tito Weiss (1964, 1965); G. Vergan (1966–1971); E. Gordienko (1972–1975); Roberto Mato (1976–1981); G. Biaggi (1982–1984); R. Nestares (1984–1988); Alfredo Hengen (1989, 1990); Haroldo Martigani (1991–1996); David Noel Gutiérrez (1997–2006); Alberto Jesús Lencinas (2007–2009); Carlos Ernesto Biaggi (2010); Samuel O. Rojo Bishop (2011–2013); Henrry Mendizábal Suárez (2014, 2015); Samuel Cabrera Luján (2016–Present).

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“Nuevas uniones en las repúblicas de Paraguay y Uruguay” [New Unions in the Republics of Paraguay and Uruguay]. La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 110, January 2010.

Nuevo Tiempo [New Time]. https://www.nuevotiempo.org/.

“Pelo DDD: Mundo J.A” [By DDD: J.A world]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 84, April 1988.

Peverini, Héctor J. En las huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence]. Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1988.

“Plantio de Igrejas: União Uruguaia” [Church planting: Uruguay Union]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1245, year 107, February 2012.

Portal de la Educación Adventista [Adventist Education Website]. https://www.educacionadventista.com/.

Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website]. https://www.adventistas.org/es/.

“Respuesta a Emergencias” [Emergency response]. Revista Institucional de ADRA Uruguay 2019 [Institutional Magazine of ADRA Uruguay 2019], no. 1, 2019.

“Retratos do Adventismo na América do Sul” [Adventism Portraits in South America]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1230, year 105, November 2010.

Sánchez, Carlos. “Presidente de Uruguay recibió libro sobre la vida de Jesús” [President of Uruguay received a book on the life of Jesus]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), April 8, 2016.

“Selo Uruguaio” [Uruguayan Stamp]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 93, May 1997.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics. http://www.adventiststatistics.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1993 and 2010.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2015 and 2019.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, various years.

Snyder, E.W. “The Work in Argentina.” The General Conferencia Bulletin 1, extra no. 19 (March 4, 1895).

Snyder, E. W. and C.A. Nowlen. “Work in South America.” The Home Missionary 4, no. 4 (April 1892).

Stauffer, A.B. “Report from Argentine and Uruguay.” ARH, June 13, 1893.

Wasiuk, Oscar N. Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay]. Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996.

Westphal, F.H. Pionero en Sudamérica [Pioneer in South America]. Libertador San Martin: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 1997.

Westphal, J.W. “The South American Union Conference.” ARH, May 24, 1906.

Zuliani, Adelar Alberto. “Origen, desarrollo y aporte del Instituto Adventista del Uruguay” [Origin, development and contribution of Uruguay Adventist Academy]. Degree Thesis in Theology, River Plate Adventist University, 2001.

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, “Uruguay Union of Churches Mission,” accessed on May 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2LbVwVf.

  2. Ibid.

  3. Colegio Adventista Barros Blancos [Barros Blancos Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/3ePELML.

  4. Colegio Adventista Del Prado [Del Prado Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YTNyaZ.

  5. Colegio Adventista Las Acacias [Las Acacias Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/3gjCbyy.

  6. Colegio Adventista Nueva Helvecia [Nueva Helvecia Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZsFTiH.

  7. Colegio Adventista Paysandú [Paysandú Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/3ieYsj7.

  8. Instituto Adventista del Uruguay [Uruguay Adventist Academy], “Oferta Educativa – IAU” [Education Offer – IAU], accessed on July 29, 2020, https://bit.ly/2BKpZZm.

  9. Liceo Adventista de Montevideo [Montevideo Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/2CU9Pwt; Portal de la Educación Adventista [Adventist Education Website], “Uruguay,” accessed on July 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZrM2vp.

  10. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Uruguay New Time Radio - Montevideo,” accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NJgyM9.

  11. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Uruguay New Time Radio - Maldonado,” accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/3eSLJ3n.

  12. ADRA Uruguay, “Bienvenido” [Welcome], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NLHJWr.

  13. “Respuesta a Emergencias” [Emergency response], Revista Institucional de ADRA Uruguay 2019 [Institutional Magazine of ADRA Uruguay 2019], no. 1, 2019, 19.

  14. “Uruguay Union of Churches Mission,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report: New Series, Volume 1 (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2019), 64.

  15. “The canvassers […] are missionaries who are in charge of sowing the Christian seed, through the delivery of thousands of books […]. Many of them make a harvest week at the end of their campaign. […] All big cities are divided into small sectors and marked on the map, and the canvassers are assigned to the areas that must be covered and served.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Publicaciones - Grandes Ciudades” [Publications - Big Cities], accessed on July 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/32PLYcx.

  16. E.W. Snyder and C.A. Nowlen, “Work in South America,” The Home Missionary 4, no. 4 (April 1892): 91.

  17. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay], Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996, 5.

  18. E.W. Snyder, “The Work in Argentina,” The General Conferencia Bulletin 1, extra no. 19 (March 4, 1895): 461-462.

  19. A.B. Stauffer, “Report from Argentine and Uruguay,” ARH, June 13, 1893, 374.

  20. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay], Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996, 5; Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Historia de América del Sur” [History of South America], accessed on July 1, 2020, http://bit.ly/2ScYEEu.

  21. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay], Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996, 10.

  22. F. H. Westphal, Pionero en Sudamérica [Pioneer in South America], Libertador San Martin: River Plate Adventist University Editorial, 1997, 76; A. G. Daniells, O. A. Olsen and L. R. Conradi, “Twenty-sixth Meeting, April 20, 10:30 A.M.,” General Conference Bulletin 4, extra no. 17 (First Quarter, April 22, 1901): 390; Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence], Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1988, 238.

  23. J.W. Westphal, “The South American Union Conference,” ARH, May 24, 1906, 14; Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence], Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1988, 239; Floyd Greenleaf, Tierra de esperanza: El crecimiento de la Iglesia Adventista Sudamericana [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America], Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2011, 96-97.

  24. Roberto Gullón Canedo, Una Semilla de Esperanza: Historia de la Estructura Denominacional [A seed of Hope: History of the Denominational Structure], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015, 78; “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 97.

  25. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay], Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996, 22-24.

  26. Roberto Gullón Canedo, Una Semilla de Esperanza: Historia de la Estructura Denominacional [A seed of Hope: History of the Denominational Structure], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015, 78; “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 97.

  27. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay], Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996, 23.

  28. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Historia de América del Sur” [History of South America], accessed on July 1, 2020, http://bit.ly/2ScYEEu.

  29. “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1914), 146.

  30. Floyd Greenleaf, A land of hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 409.

  31. “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1941), 183.

  32. “South American Division,” 1940 Annual Statistical Report (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1940), 14.

  33. Floyd Greenleaf, A land of hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 410.

  34. “La Voz de la Profecía” [The Voice of Prophecy] was a radio program that “started in 1942, in Glendale, California, [and although it began] with the name ‘La Voz de la Profecía,’ [because of the North American radio program The Voice of Prophecy, founded in 1929 by H. M. S. Richards], it was later [called] ‘La Voz de la Esperanza’ [The Voice of Hope]. Its main mission was to reach – through the radio – the population of the Spanish-speaking world with the gospel of salvation. From the very beginning, the program ‘La Voz’ [The Voice] had a tremendous reception, which has continued through the years. Its first director and speaker was Braulio Pérez Marcio.” La Voz de la Esperanza [The Voice of Hope], “Nuestra Historia” [Our History], accessed on July 29, 2020, https://bit.ly/30VXPDf.

  35. Floyd Greenleaf, A land of hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 413.

  36. Instituto Adventista del Uruguay [Uruguay Adventist Academy], “Nuestra Historia” [Our History], accessed on June 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/3d73TwF.

  37. Floyd Greenleaf, A land of hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 450.

  38. Adelar Alberto Zuliani, “Origen, desarrollo y aporte del Instituto Adventista del Uruguay” [Origin, development and contribution of Uruguay Adventist Academy], Degree Thesis in Theology, River Plate Adventist University, 2001, 58.

  39. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old,” […] They “meet, in general, once a week, in order to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature. This group is characterized by thrilling with outdoor activities such as camping, hiking, climbing mountains, exploring forests and caves. [...] The Pathfinders Club is present in more than 160 countries, with 90,000 headquarters and more than two million participants. They legally exist since 1950, as an official program of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Boys and girls of any religious faith can join this movement that has diversity, color, and youthful energy.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Conquistadores – ¿Quiénes son los Conquistadores?” [Pathfinders – Who are the Pathfinders?], accessed on July 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/3954UoM.

  40. “Camporee is a large camp that gathers teenagers, youth and children who participate in the Pathfinders clubs, directed by the Seventh-day Adventist Church around the world.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Camporí de Conquistadores de la DSA” [Pathfinders Camporee of the South America Division (SAD)], accessed on July 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/30fhBcx.

  41. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Conquistadores – Origen Histórico: los conquistadores llegan a Sudamérica” [Pathfinders – Historical Origin: pathfinders arrive in South America], accessed on May 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2yusq0r.

  42. Colegio Adventista Las Acacias [Las Acacias Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on July 1, 2020, https://bit.ly/3gjCbyy.

  43. “Nosotros” [About Us], Revista Institucional de ADRA Uruguay 2019 [Institutional Magazine of ADRA Uruguay 2019], no. 1, 2019, 3.

  44. “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1977), 251.

  45. Floyd Greenleaf, A land of hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 609.

  46. Canvassing work “is a way of doing missionary work through the distribution of books and magazines, achieving many benefits. Among them, economic resources to study at the University or as livelihood.” Adventistas Buenos Aires - Zona Norte [Buenos Aires Adventists - North Zone], Facebook post, October 11, 2018 (11:47 a.m.), accessed on July 27, 2020, https://bit.ly/2CITsU1.

  47. Floyd Greenleaf, A land of hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 609.

  48. “Pelo DDD: Mundo J.A” [By DDD: J.A world], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 84, April 1988, 24.

  49. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay], Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996, 42.

  50. “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1993), 251.

  51. “Selo Uruguaio” [Uruguayan Stamp], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 93, May 1997, 7.

  52. Nuevo Tiempo [New Time], “Radio Nuevo Tiempo – Donde Escuchar” [New Time Radio – Where to listen], accessed on July 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/3jUpq0b.

  53. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Uruguay Mission - Yearly Statistics (2000-2008),” accessed on July 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/3ev2ikO.

  54. Floyd Greenleaf, Tierra de esperanza: El crecimiento de la Iglesia Adventista Sudamericana [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America], Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2011, 709.

  55. “DSA elege líderes das Uniões Uruguaia e Paraguaia” [SAD elects leaders of the Uruguay and Paraguay Unions], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1219, year 104, December 2009, 35.

  56. “Nuevas uniones en las repúblicas de Paraguay y Uruguay” [New Unions in the Republics of Paraguay and Uruguay], La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 110, January 2010, 6.

  57. “Uruguay Union of Churches Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 297.

  58. “Retratos do Adventismo na América do Sul” [Adventism Portraits in South America], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1230, year 105, November 2010, 33.

  59. “Global Mission is a branch of the Adventist Mission front line. It is a department of the world Seventh-day Adventist headquarters. Since 1990, Global Mission has established new congregations in unreached areas in the world. [...] The Global Mission projects began as local initiatives. They include the sponsorship of lay members, the so-called pioneers, who volunteer for a minimum period of one year to establish a new congregation in their culture.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Misión Global – ¿Qué es Misión Global?” [Global Mission – What is Global Mission?], accessed on July 17, 2020, https://bit.ly/2OzWso4.

  60. “Plantio de Igrejas: União Uruguaia” [Church planting: Uruguay Union], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1245, year 107, February 2012, 27.

  61. Comunicación Unión Uruguaya [Uruguay Union Communication], “Primer Liceo Adventista fue inaugurado en la ciudad de Montevideo Uruguay” [First Adventist High School was inaugurated in the city of Montevideo Uruguay], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], May 2, 2016, accessed on June 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/3c1Nmdz.

  62. Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día, Uruguay [Seventh-day Adventist Church, Uruguay], “Informe de Educación 2013, IASD Union Uruguaya” [Education Report 2013, Uruguay Union SDA church], video with educational data report of Uruguay Union in 2013, August 29, 2013, accessed on June 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/31G0RgO.

  63. Through the Impacto Esperanza [Hope Impact] project, Adventists encourage reading and distribute missionary books to the population of South America. “From house to house, at the stoplight or even on the tip of a ship, volunteers have been reaching out for a decade to deliver not a simple book, but an opportunity for a new start, for reconciliation. […] In ten years, the Asociación Casa Editora Sudamericana [South American Spanish Publishing House] and Casa Publicadora Brasileira [Brazil Publishing House] have produced more than 170 million missionary books.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Impacto Esperanza – 10 Años” [Hope Impact – 10 Years], accessed on July 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Bbs3JC.

  64. Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día, Uruguay [Seventh-day Adventist Church, Uruguay], “Unión Uruguaya - Crecimiento Agosto 2014” [Uruguay Union - August 2014 Growth], video with an overview of growth data and activities of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay, August 4, 2014, accessed on June 3, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Ap83Tg.

  65. “South American Division,” 2015 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2015), 21.

  66. “Uruguay Union of Churches Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2015), 313.

  67. Giselly Abdala, “Uruguay realiza su primer encuentro de líderes de Clubes de Conquistadores” [Uruguay holds its first meeting of Pathfinders Club leaders], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], April 16, 2015, accessed on June 10, 2020, https://bit.ly/2XRJgjL.

  68. Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día, Uruguay [Seventh-day Adventist Church, Uruguay], “Informe SEHS Uruguay - 2019” [SEHS Uruguay Report - 2019], video with the SEHS report for the III Quinquennial of Uruguay Union, November 20, 2019, accessed on May 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2BAeOCd.

  69. Ibid.

  70. Carlos Sánchez, “Presidente de Uruguay recibió libro sobre la vida de Jesús” [President of Uruguay received a book on the life of Jesus], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], April 8, 2016, accessed on June 3, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Yy9cli.

  71. Cecilia Ferreira and Verónica Korsun, “Una iglesia adventista de niños en Uruguay” [An Adventist church of children in Uruguay], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], October 31, 2013, accessed on June 8, 2020, https://bit.ly/2z8IXXM.

  72. The Adventurers Club is a specific program for children from 6 to 9 years old, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, in 1972. At the meetings, the children engage in activities focused on physical, mental, and spiritual development. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Aventureros” [Adventurers], accessed on July 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/32rhb5s.

  73. Ministerio de Conquistadores y Aventureros DSA [SAD Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministry], “Estadísticas - Unión Uruguaya” [Statistics - Uruguay Union], accessed on June 8, 2020, https://bit.ly/31yz5mu.

  74. The ‘Primero Dios’ [God First] project aims to “motivate everyone to reserve the first hour of the day to be in communion with God, worshiping, praying and reading the word of God.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Jornada Primero Dios” [God First day], accessed on July 29, 2020, https://bit.ly/3fbU1mv.

  75. Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día, Uruguay [Seventh-day Adventist Church, Uruguay], “Informe - III Congreso Quinquenal de la Unión Uruguaya” [Report - III Quinquennial Congress of Uruguay Union], video with the latest information from the church in Uruguay, November 17, 2019, accessed June 3, 2020, https://bit.ly/2VGknpG.

  76. “The grupos pequeños [small groups] (GP) are made up of several people who meet once a week to study the Bible. The SDA church takes this model from the experience of the early Christians. The meetings are conducted by a leader, who directs the Bible study, also supported by a range of materials edited by the SDA.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Ministerio Personal – Grupos Pequeños” [Personal Ministries – Small Groups], accessed on July 17, 2020, https://bit.ly/3jf0n7C.

  77. Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día, Uruguay [Seventh-day Adventist Church, Uruguay], “Informe - III Congreso Quinquenal de la Unión Uruguaya” [Report - III Quinquennial Congress of Uruguay Union], video with the latest information from the church in Uruguay, November 17, 2019, accessed June 3, 2020, https://bit.ly/2VGknpG.

  78. Oscar N. Wasiuk, Reseña histórica de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día en el Uruguay [Historical review of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Uruguay] (Florida, Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1996), 24-26, 44; Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Uruguay Union of Churches Mission,” accessed on April 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/3ifgqln; “Uruguay Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 97; “Uruguay Union of Churches Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 266. For more information about all the leaders of Uruguay Union, see the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks from 1907 to 2020.

×

Vieira, Adilson da Silva, Fabián Marcos. "Uruguay Union of Churches Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GQX.

Vieira, Adilson da Silva, Fabián Marcos. "Uruguay Union of Churches Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Date of access March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GQX.

Vieira, Adilson da Silva, Fabián Marcos (2021, January 10). Uruguay Union of Churches Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GQX.