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Naor Klein

Photo courtesy of Brazilian White Center - UNASP.

Klein, Naor (1916–2003)

By The Brazilian White Center – UNASP

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The Brazilian White Center – UNASP is a team of teachers and students at the Brazilian Ellen G. White Research Center – UNASP at the Brazilian Adventist University, Campus Engenheiro, Coelho, SP. The team was supervised by Drs. Adolfo Semo Suárez, Renato Stencel, and Carlos Flávio Teixeira. Bruno Sales Gomes Ferreira provided technical support. The following names are of team members: Adriane Ferrari Silva, Álan Gracioto Alexandre, Allen Jair Urcia Santa Cruz, Camila Chede Amaral Lucena, Camilla Rodrigues Seixas, Daniel Fernandes Teodoro, Danillo Alfredo Rios Junior, Danilo Fauster de Souza, Débora Arana Mayer, Elvis Eli Martins Filho, Felipe Cardoso do Nascimento, Fernanda Nascimento Oliveira, Gabriel Pilon Galvani, Giovana de Castro Vaz, Guilherme Cardoso Ricardo Martins, Gustavo Costa Vieira Novaes, Ingrid Sthéfane Santos Andrade, Isabela Pimenta Gravina, Ivo Ribeiro de Carvalho, Jhoseyr Davison Voos dos Santos, João Lucas Moraes Pereira, Kalline Meira Rocha Santos, Larissa Menegazzo Nunes, Letícia Miola Figueiredo, Luan Alves Cota Mól, Lucas Almeida dos Santos, Lucas Arteaga Aquino, Lucas Dias de Melo, Matheus Brabo Peres, Mayla Magaieski Graepp, Milena Guimarães Silva, Natália Padilha Corrêa, Rafaela Lima Gouvêa, Rogel Maio Nogueira Tavares Filho, Ryan Matheus do Ouro Medeiros, Samara Souza Santos, Sergio Henrique Micael Santos, Suelen Alves de Almeida, Talita Paim Veloso de Castro, Thais Cristina Benedetti, Thaís Caroline de Almeida Lima, Vanessa Stehling Belgd, Victor Alves Pereira, Vinicios Fernandes Alencar, Vinícius Pereira Nascimento, Vitória Regina Boita da Silva, William Edward Timm, Julio Cesar Ribeiro, Ellen Deó Bortolotte, Maria Júlia dos Santos Galvani, Giovana Souto Pereira, Victor Hugo Vaz Storch, and Dinely Luana Pereira.

 

 

First Published: June 24, 2021

Naor Klein, a pastor and accountant, was born to Libório Klein and Eva Machado Klein on June 6, 1916, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. He had two sisters: Neida Klein (Stoher) and Neusa Klein (Harder). In his childhood, the family acquired a farm in the city of Santo Amaro (that later became a part of São Paulo city) next to Brazil College (now UNASP-SP). He was raised by Adventist parents who carefully guide their children to become workers in the Lord’s Church. After completing elementary education, Naor left school in order to help on the farm where they raised chickens and cows, made cheese, had a vegetable garden, and traded these products to support the family.1

Years later, his older sister Neida married Waldemar Stoher, who was pastor in Presidente Prudente in the countryside of São Paulo. It was voted by the São Paulo Conference that a church should be built in this city. However, the church members could not afford it, so Pastor Waldemar started a campaign to help with the construction costs. Naor got involved and started a pastel business (Brazilian fried food, similar to empanada). His main clients were students from Brazil College, and by this means, Naor met Toni Sostag (December 28, 1915 – December 24, 1999), who would become his wife in the future.2

In January 1937, he began working as an office assistant for the São Paulo Conference. Afterwards, Naor and Toni were married on July 27, 1939, in the city of Jaguariaíva in the state of Paraná, during a ceremony officiated by Pastor Hermínio Sarli. The couple had two children: Deise Klein (Simon) (b. August 26, 1941) and Dalmo Klein (b. February 28, 1946 – d. December 18, 2009).3 Toni served the Church in different areas,including as a deaconess, director of children's ministry, and Bible instructor with her husband.4

In order to build a family, Naor completed an Education for Adults Program and, afterwards, an Accounting Technician course in 1942.5 Following this, he accepted a call to teach accounting at Brazil College beginning in February 1943. In the meantime, he continued studying and completed a degree in Theology in 1944.6 Two years later in February 1945, Naor was appointed as Secretary-Treasurer for the São Paulo Conference.7

Due to his administrative skills and trustworthy conduct, Naor was appointed as Secretary-Treasurer and Auditor for the South Brazil Union Conference,8 where he served from 1949 to 1967.9 In conjunction with this occupation, he was pastor for many years of the district of Sacomã in the city of São Paulo, and held the first baptism of the nearby district of Americanópolis in 1959. He was ordained to the ministry on January 24, 1953.10 

After 18 years at the South Brazil Union, Naor was appointed as an assistant treasurer for the South American Division, becoming responsible for the Brazilian territory.11 From May 1972, Klein worked as assistant auditor for the Division, and although he retired on December 31, 1975,12 he held this position until 1978.13

As a member, leader, and pastor, Naor sought to develop opportunities for fellowship and healthy entertainment for young people. He began organizing camp meetings within the local church around 1948, which became known and imitated with an increasing reach and were successfully held for over 25 years. Naor was frequently requested by youth leaders of the South and East Brazil Unions, organizing camp meetings in São Carlos in the state of São Paulo; Satulina in the state of Rio de Janeiro; and Brasília in the Federal District, among others. For the South American Division, he assisted in the organization of congresses such as Quitandinha (Rio de Janeiro, 1956) and Maranata (Curitiba, 1970). In addition, he was frequently invited to preach and hold weeks of prayer and was known as a caring counselor by church members.14

Naor Klein’s 40-year ministry to the Adventist Church in Brazil was very important in the administrative and pastoral areas. He continued serving until his death on December 17, 2003, at 87 years of age. He was buried in the family's tomb at Hortolândia Park Cemetery in the state of São Paulo.15

Sources

“Assembleia Ordinária da Associação Paulista dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia.” Revista Adventista 40, no. 12 (December 1945).

“Assembleias da União Sul- Brasileira, Colégio Adventista e Casa Publicadora Brasileira.” Revista Adventista 44, no. 2 (February 1949).

Certificado de Ordenação. In Collection of the National Center of Adventist History/Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC, Engenheiro Coelho, S Bookcase: 02. Shelf: 06. Folder/Box: “Klein, Naor.” Accessed May 29, 2019.

Diploma de Contador. In Collection of the National Center of Adventist History/Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC, Engenheiro Coelho, S Bookcase: 02. Shelf: 06. Folder/Box: “Klein, Naor.” Accessed May 29, 2019.

“Igreja Adventista de São Paulo, SP (Americanópolis).” National Adventist Memory Center, March 4, 2015. Accessed May 7, 2020. http://www.memoriaadventista.com.br/wikiasd/index.php?title=Igreja_Adventista_de_S%C3%A3o_Paulo,_SP_(American%C3%B3polis).

Seminário Adventista. In Collection of the National Center of Adventist History/Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC, S Bookcase: 02. Shelf: 06. Folder/Box: “Klein, Naor.” Accessed May 29, 2019.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Notes

  1. Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019.

  2. Ibid.

  3. Ibid.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Ibid.; Diploma de contador (Collection of the National Center of Adventist History/Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC, SP), 1.

  6. Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019; Seminário Adventista (Collection of the National Center of Adventist History/Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC, Engenheiro Coelho, SP), 1.

  7. Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019; “Assembléia Ordinária da Associação Paulista dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia,” Revista Adventista 40, no. 12 (December 1945): 25; “São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1946), 160.

  8. “Assembleias da União Sul- Brasileira, Colégio Adventista e Casa Publicadora Brasileira,” Revista Adventista 44, no. 2 (February 1949): 14; Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019.

  9. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1950), 167; “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1967), 209; Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019.

  10. Certificado de Ordenação (Collection of the National Center of Adventist History/Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC), 1; Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019; “Igreja Adventista de São Paulo, SP (Americanópolis),” National Adventist Memory Center, March 4, 2015, accessed May 7, 2020, http://www.memoriaadventista.com.br/wikiasd/index.php?title=Igreja_Adventista_de_S%C3%A3o_Paulo,_SP_(American%C3%B3polis).

  11. “South American Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1968), 195.

  12. Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019.

  13. “South American Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1979), 259.

  14. Deise Simon, email message to Letícia Miola, May 29, 2019.

  15. Ibid.

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UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Klein, Naor (1916–2003)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 24, 2021. Accessed June 17, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6GJZ.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Klein, Naor (1916–2003)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 24, 2021. Date of access June 17, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6GJZ.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center – (2021, June 24). Klein, Naor (1916–2003). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 17, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6GJZ.