C. C. Lewis, the first principal of Minnesota Conference School (1888-1890).

Photo courtesy of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Archives.

Maplewood Academy

By Kathy Joy Parke

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Kathy Joy Parke, L.P.N. is a 1976 graduate of Bemidji AVTI (now called Northwest Technical College) in Bemidji, Minnesota. Kathy served as a medical office nurse and administrator before retiring in 2016. She currently manages a website devoted to Minnesota Seventh-day Adventist history, www.mnsdahistory.org, and she provides historical displays at Minnesota camp meetings and her alma mater, Maplewood Academy. In assisting the Minnesota Conference with historical projects, Kathy published a history of the conference in 2012, From the Wilds of Minnesota commemorating their 150th anniversary. 

Maplewood Academy is a coeducational boarding high school operated by the Minnesota Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. The roots of the school lie early in the development of the conference.

Minnesota Educational Developments

Less than two decades after the organization of the Minnesota Conference, constituents decided that their youth needed home and foreign missionary service training. In 1879 they formed a board of trustees both to encourage Minnesota youth to attend the recently established Battle Creek College in Michigan and to manage scholarships and loans for their enrollment.1 Battle Creek College president W. W. Prescott visited Minnesota's camp meeting in 1887, "setting forth strong reasons why we as a people should patronize the College." Some attended the college and benefited from Minnesota's Educational Relief Fund, but it soon became clear that the conference needed a school in Minnesota itself to prepare students for college.2

In April, 1888, the General Conference committee not only asked Prescott to promote the college at camp meetings again but also recommended that states establish conference preparatory schools.3 In June 1888 at Minnesota's camp meeting, Prescott and E. W. Farnsworth once more emphasized the college’s importance, and local leaders laid plans to establish a preparatory school (high school).4

During late 1888, former (and first) Minnesota Conference president, Washington Morse, voiced support for the idea, stating, "Had our people generally, from the first years of their rise, made it their inflexible rule to have their children educated in the faith ... thousands might have been saved to the cause who have gone off into the world, and now have little or no interest in the present truth or its success.”5

Founding of the Minnesota Conference School

In 1886 Adventists built a church on the northwest corner of Lake Street and Fourth Avenue in Minneapolis. Two years later the Minnesota Conference started a preparatory school in the Minneapolis church basement.6 Although it did not open until after the General Conference session met in the church; the General Conference did promote it, voting "that each Conference donate what it shall feel disposed to, toward the Minnesota school ..."7

On November 14, 1888, the "Minnesota Conference School" opened as the first conference school east of the Rocky Mountains and the third Adventist preparatory school outside of Battle Creek (two Oregon schools had already started).8 A stellar faculty who later served in leading world church roles welcomed the nearly 60 students. Principal Charles C. Lewis led while his wife, Elizabeth (Wiley) Lewis supervised the girls' home. Also teaching were two Battle Creek graduates in their first assignments–Miss Elsie M. Westphal (later Mrs. Clifford G. Howell) and Miss Sarah E. Peck.9 Myrtle G. Griffis (later Mrs. C. H. Parker) also soon joined the teaching staff.10

In 1890, anticipating the opening of Union College in Lincoln, Nebraska, and thinking most students would transfer there, leaders planned to close the Minnesota school. The opening of Union College was delayed until 1891, however, and Minnesotans scrambled to continue their school. Since the previous faculty had been released, it was necessary to hire new teachers. Another 1888 Battle Creek graduate, E. A. Sutherland, became principal and Sutherland's wife, Sallie, also taught.11 Anna Weller (later Mrs. M. W. Newton) joined as a third teacher.12 By November 15 escalating enrollment led to the recruitment of a fourth teacher– Fred Norton.13 In 1891, Prescott reported a school attendance of about 75.14

During the first year the school accepted some primary grade students, but discontinued the primary grades the next year. Housing varied. By the second year male students lived with private families and girls roomed in the principal's home or boarded on the second floor of the tract society building. Some students took up residence in the dining hall across the street.15

In the fall of 1891, many students transferred to Union College.16 From 1891 to 1898, the Minnesota school ran a limited winter program, often including a canvasser's course (learning to sell Christian books).17

Many Minnesota Conference School students continued their education and spent careers in church service. Known individuals include: Charles A. Burman; Marius and Elisabeth (Libby Johnson) Christensen; Emma (Collins) Ellis; George Emmerson; Carrie (Hawley) Johnson; George Edmund Johnson; Lena (Mortenson) Peterson; Letty (Nichols) Anderson; Minnie (Perkins) Owen; Alice (Redoute) Starr; Cora (Seaman) Diedricks; and Francis (Frank) Detamore.18 Detamore went on to Battle Creek College where he heard Ellen White speak on the importance of church (primary grade) schools. Impressed, he wrote a letter back home to Minnesota, stating his willingness to return and start a school with no pay other than room and board. As a result, in 1898, he opened the first Minnesota church school at Good Thunder.19

Relocation to Anoka and Renamed the Minnesota Industrial School

By 1898 leaders deemed the Minneapolis church as no longer suitable for a school. The basement classrooms had poor ventilation, housing was inadequate, and many felt concerned about the allurements of the surrounding city. Minnesota Conference president, C. W. Flaiz, pleaded with constituents to provide a school on a farm.20 After the purchase of a farm southwest of Anoka, opposition arose to having a boarding school in that area, so church leaders sold the property and obtained temporary quarters in Anoka's former Commercial Hotel on the northeast corner of Ferry and Main Streets.21

The "Minnesota Industrial School" at Anoka opened on October 18, 1899, again boasting an outstanding faculty team who later served in prominent church roles. Not surprisingly, Frank Detamore was the first principal. Teachers included Miss Frances M. Kennedy and Myron Winchell while Arthur and Mary Moon cooked meals. Later faculty included: Otto J. Graf (likely as principal); Harold J. Sheldon; Benjamin Francis; and probably E. W. Catlin (likely as principal).22 The 1903-1904 faculty had Marshall B. Van Kirk as principal and Miss Wavie Tubbs as a teacher.23

About 65 students enrolled initially, but by the 1903-1904 school term enrollment was around 40. The three-story building encompassed classrooms and administrative areas on the first floor, kitchen and dining hall in the basement, girls’ dormitory on the second floor, and boys' dormitory on the third floor. Besides traditional academic classes, the school also taught commercial and manual arts. Students held Bible meetings, shared religious literature, raised funds for missions, and helped the poor and sick. The school's missionary spirit is revealed in a statement explaining why there's no known photograph of the students: "Some of our students wanted a picture of the school, but we talked it over and decided that we would rather donate the amount to foreign fields. Seven dollars was thus given."24

Relocation to Maple Plain and Renamed Maplewood Academy

Leaders continued searching for a rural setting, finally purchasing a farm near Maple Plain in 1902, but they lacked funds to construct buildings. At a November 1902 business meeting organizers determined to raise $8,000 for the new school with $1,500 pledged immediately. Additional fund raising progressed slowly, but, with renewed zeal at the 1904 camp meeting, leaders raised sufficient money to erect the main building debt-free so that school could open that fall. The 94-acre farm was on a beautiful piece of land sloping gently to the shores of Rice Lake (later named Lake Katrina). Today it is the site of the Near Wilderness Settlement in Baker Park Preserve. The property included woods, farm land, and orchards. The setting in a maple grove soon brought a name change–Maplewood Academy.25

Fifty-seven students enrolled in the fall of 1904 and the faculty welcoming them were all Minnesota natives. Otto O. Bernstein was the principal assisted by a faculty consisting of his wife, Myrtle (Franklin) Bernstein, Miss Caroline Hopkins, and Miss Lena Rosenthal along with Wavie D. Tubbs and Harold. J. Sheldon, both having taught at the Anoka school. Ralph E. Campbell supervised the farm, which provided employment and a wholesome setting for the students.26

The administration building, constructed in 1904, was a two and a half story 40-foot square structure initially housing most operations. In 1905 the school erected a 30-foot by 24-foot dormitory with 26 rooms–again, debt-free. Enrollment, however, soon exceeded school capacity. By 1910, with a capacity for 80 students, the school had 120 attending. Three or four students crowded into rooms designed for two, and a few slept in the hall. The school had to refuse some applicants because of space limitations. The needs were obvious, and additional buildings soon appeared, with church members and leaders (including the conference president) participating in their construction. In 1911 they erected a girls' dormitory with the same dimensions as the first dormitory and added a chapel and dining room onto the administration building. To provide student labor and care for academic needs, they added a chicken coop and blacksmith and carpentry shops. Then the school put up an eight-room teachers' cottage in 1915 and built an addition to the barn. Electricity, a welcome addition, arrived in 1917. A 30-foot extension to the girls' dormitory in 1919 provided 14 more rooms and a parlor. The school also erected a three-room cottage to quarantine patients with communicable diseases, completed just in time for a smallpox epidemic. In 1921 a 30-foot addition expanded the boys' dormitory. Located in the maple grove, all buildings faced a rectangular lawn, the administration building being on the south (lake) side, the girls' dorm on the west, the boys' dorm on the east, the teachers' cottage and isolation cottage on the north. The farm on the north side of the property hosted dairy cattle and chickens. The campus still used horses for work and transportation. Gardens and berry patches provided student employment, school provisions, and produce to sell in the community.27

Studies included traditional subjects, Bible studies, mission courses, and church history classes. The academy also offered practical classes such as stenography, type-setting, music, hydrotherapy, first-aid, sewing, millinery, cooking, farming, blacksmithing, and carpentry. While the school was college preparatory, during its early years it also offered some seventh and eighth grade level classes when needed.28

In 1905, Bernstein explained the financial terms for attendance: "Two hours' industrial work is required daily of each student for which an allowance of five dollars is made thus reducing the student's monthly expense to ten dollars. Board (three meals per day), tuition, rooms, light, heat, laundry work etc., is covered by the ten dollars."29 School maintenance provided some student employment but later the academy opened industries such as the Fibre Furniture Shop which made furniture to sell to stores like Donaldson's in Minneapolis.30 Some students also worked at the school during the summer or as literature evangelists.31

With more than 100 students at the close of the second school year, Bernstein reported "the following nationalities and number of students were represented: English, thirty-three; German, nineteen; Swede, seventeen; Norwegian, twelve; Danish, five; Irish, four; Bohemian, three; Dutch, two; French, one; Polish, one; Scotch, one; Mexican, one; Swiss, one; and African, one."32

Enrollment steadily rose. By 1920 it reached 150 and, during the Maple Plain years, it peaked in 1927 at 170.33 The first graduating class in 1909 had two members, Carl J. Martinson and Winifred V. Halverson.34 Martinson became a noted physician, founding Minnetonka Hospital. He was a life-long Maplewood supporter and an avid collector of Adventist history memorabilia.35 Sadly, Halverson passed away less than two years later of scarlet fever complications during her junior year at Union College.36 The 1910 Maplewood class had five graduates, and classes grew until, by the 1920s, they had close to 20 graduates.37

In 1917, after a University of Minnesota review, the Minnesota State Board of Education accredited Maplewood Academy. When Adventist professor and education administrator Frederick Griggs visited the school in 1917, he stated "that there was no finer academy in the denomination than Maplewood." The academy had become a first-rate school. Both Adventist and non-Adventist students (as many as half the student body were non-members) benefited from its environment.38

One noted non-Adventist student was the son of Scandinavian immigrants, Adrian Lauritzen, who entered Maplewood in 1921. Not being Adventist, he had a rubber stamp made to use on his school papers with the message, "Be a good Lutheran." As he interacted with students and faculty, however, and became immersed in Bible classes and spiritual activities, he found something unique that he wanted to be a part of. After graduation in 1925, Lauritzen became an Adventist and soon his parents joined him. Adrian and his wife (Evelyn Sorensen, Maplewood class of 1940), taught at Maplewood several years. Acquiring a doctorate in music, he later served at the McPhail School of Music and the University of Minnesota. He always enjoyed preaching and evangelism. Dubbed "Mr. Maplewood" in later years, Dr. Lauritzen was devoted to promoting the academy and preserving the history of the school and of Seventh-day Adventists in Minnesota, resulting in his book, Saints of the Northern Star. In 1985, designated Maplewood's first Alumnus of the Year, he stated, "If it hadn't been for Maplewood, I would never have become an Adventist."39

Relocation to Hutchinson

Shortly after Maplewood’s organization, the Northern Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists (comprised of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa) opened the "Danish-Norwegian Seminary" in 1910 at Hutchinson, Minnesota, providing immigrants with instruction in their native tongue.40 It offered both academy (high school) and college classes.41 In 1917, the school expanded and later took the name "Hutchinson Theological Seminary."42 By 1928, as students became fluent in English, enrollment declined and the seminary encountered financial challenges. Most seminary students took academy level classes and, since Minnesota had an academy at Maple Plain, leaders proposed a merger of the seminary and Maplewood at Hutchinson. Despite some resistance, at the 1928 camp meeting the constituencies successfully voted the consolidation. For a time, Scandinavian language instruction continued in some courses.43 Even today, Maplewood continues to provide a multi-cultural experience.

In the fall of 1928, the combined school opened at Hutchinson as "Maplewood Academy" under the leadership of Alvin W. Johnson, the former Maple Plain principal. Several faculty from the merged schools served Maplewood in Hutchinson, including Wavie D. Tubbs, the only instructor who served at the Minnesota Industrial School in Anoka, Maplewood Academy in Maple Plain and Maplewood at Hutchinson.44

Maplewood Academy was now located at the summit of a broad hill, leading to its designation as "The School on the Hill." The imposing brick structure housed the entire school plant–classrooms, offices, library, chapel, kitchen and dining hall, book bindery and print shop. To the west was the 160-acre farm and to the north was a wooded area. In 1939, Maplewood built a gymnasium, the basement housing a craft shop producing wood products and a broom factory.45 By 1955, the property had enlarged to 281 acres.46

As enrollment steadily climbed, leadership envisioned an ambitious building plan.47 In early 1958, a newly-built multi-purpose structure housed a cafeteria, music facilities, and a home economics department.48 In 1959, construction began on a 700-seat capacity church, the first services being held April 8, 1961.49 Arriving in 1960 to serve as vice principal and music director, Maplewood 1942 graduate, Lyle C. Anderson, became principal in 1961 and oversaw further building developments (departing in 1973 as the second longest serving Maplewood principal).50 During Anderson's tenure, the school constructed a 70-room girls' dormitory in 1963.51 In 1967 a new 2,000-seat capacity gymnasium went up between the girls' dormitory and the future boys' dormitory site (the 1939 gym being re-purposed and eventually demolished). Completion of the new gymnasium was just in time to host camp meeting (it continues to meet there).52 In 1968 the campus added a 60-foot by 143-foot book bindery, a Harris Pine Mill factory opened, and construction began on a boys' dormitory occupied the fall of 1969.53

During the early 1970s, administration discussed the future of Maplewood's grand old administration building. In October 1976 the building was listed on the Minnesota Inventory of Historic Places and later the property was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.54 Maintaining the building, however, was challenging, and on June 19, 1978, the conference voted a new administration complex.55 On June 10, 1979, a ground-breaking ceremony took place.56 The new building rose during the next year. Friends, faculty, and students gathered on January 30, 1980, to pay tribute to the older structure. Moving into the new building started January 29, 1980, and on February 6, 1980, demolition of the old building began. It was a tearful day for many alumni and friends. The old building had served Adventists and the Hutchinson community for 78 years.57 The current administration building chapel rests on the site of the former building–a fitting tribute to the beloved edifice.58

The ambitious building program was a reflection of growing enrollment in the school, steadily climbing through the decades, reaching a peak enrollment of 239 in 1970 and again in 1979.59 Like many academies, though, Maplewood experienced a rapid enrollment decline through the 1980s. By 1985 it had dropped to 118.60 While other schools have closed, however, Maplewood has maintained a solid program, with enrollment stabilizing around 100 each year.61

The continued welfare of the school has resulted from active support of alumni, the Minnesota Conference, and other resources combined with a team of solid faculty. From 1991 to 2004 and again in 2010 through 2012, Marshall Bowers led as the longest serving Maplewood principal. Marshall and his wife (Lois Burghart, Maplewood class of 1971) have continued to advocate for the school into their retirement and were designated Alumni of the Year in 2018.

Through the years, many alumni have served in their communities and throughout the world, laboring with a dedication representative of the education they received "back home" in Minnesota. Several have taken church positions, serving as pastors, missionaries, teachers, administrators, health care workers, and in a variety of other roles. But most importantly, students acquired a knowledge of God and a desire to share it with others. Students, faculty, and staff members have been transformed as they passed through the doors of the school, whether it be a poorly ventilated church basement, a former hotel, buildings nestled in a maple grove beside a lake, an impressive edifice set high upon a hill, or a modern-style educational complex. Time has changed the location and physical structures, but time has never altered the school's mission to lead young people to Jesus and train them to labor for eternal goals as echoed in the words on the school seal–"Educating for Eternity."62

School Address

700 Main Street North, Hutchinson, MN 55350

Accreditations

Adventist Accrediting Association

National Council for Private School Accreditation

Nonpublic Education Council, Minnesota Department of Education

Principals

Minnesota Conference School (1888-1898): C. C. Lewis, 1888-1890; E. A. Sutherland, 1890-1891; Unknown, 1891-1898.

Minnesota Industrial School (1899-1904): Frank Detamore, probably 1899-1900; Otto J. Graf, probably 1900-1901; E. W. Catlin, probably 1901-1902; M. B. Van Kirk, probably 1903-1904.

Maplewood Academy (1904-): Otto O. Bernstein, 1904-1906; Harold J. Sheldon (1st tenure), 1906-1912; R. W. Brown, 1912-1913; Robert A. Hare, 1913-1918; Lawrence R. Anderson, 1918-1920; Harold J. Sheldon (2nd tenure), 1920-1921; Louis C. Palmer, 1921-1924; John J. Mair (1914 MWA graduate), 1924-1926; Alvin W. Johnson, 1926-1932; W. J. McComb, 1932-1933; David Gulbrandson, 1933-1935; E. F. Heim, 1935-1941; David J. Bieber, 1941-1945; J. V. Peters, 1945-1946; Peter C. Jarnes, 1946-1947; Charles L. Smith, 1947-1948; George P. Stone, 1948-1952; Benjamin G. Butherus, 1952-1957; LaVerne E. McClain (1st tenure), 1957-1960; Boyd E. Olson, 1960-1961; Lyle C. Anderson (1942 MWA graduate), 1961-1973; LaVerne E. McClain (2nd tenure), 1973-1977; Rick Emery, 1977-1981; Victor C. Hilbert, 1981-1983; Lyndon G. Furst, 1983-1987; Gary D. Wilson, 1987-1991; Marshall W. Bowers (1st tenure), 1991-2004; Luana Knable, 2004-2005; Steve J. Sherman, 2005-2010; Marshall W. Bowers (2nd tenure), 2010-2012; Justin Okimi, 2012-2015; Stacy Stocks, 2015-2018; Glen Baker, 2018-2019; John Bedell, 2019-.

Sources

Anderson, C. V. "Maplewood Academy Plans." Northern Union Outlook, February 19, 1946.

Anderson, Lyle C. "Maplewood Academy Fall School Term." Northern Union Outlook, August 30, 1968.

Bernstein, O. O. "Maplewood (Minn) Academy." The Educational Messenger, November 15, 1905.

Detamore, F. A. "A Remarkable Reunion." ARH, April 21, 1938.

Detamore, F. A. "Extracts From The Letters Of Church-School Teachers." The Advocate, April 1, 1900.

Dittes, Florence G., Roy C. Livingston, Ernest Sheldon, and Wavie D. Tubbs. "Minnesota." Northern Union Reaper, December 18, 1906.

"Down Is Up." Northern Union Outlook, March 17, 1980.

Edwards, C. A. "Impressions of Maplewood." Northern Union Outlook, February 7, 1961.

"Farewell Old Ad Building." Northern Union Outlook, March 3, 1980.

Flaiz, C. W. "Shall Minnesota Have A School?" The Minnesota Worker, November 9, 1898.

"Ground Broken For New Administration Building." Northern Union Outlook, July 2, 1979.

Hiatt, H. M. "Maplewood Academy." Northern Union Reaper, November 27, 1917.

"History of Maplewood Academy." Northern Union Outlook, August 16, 1960.

Lauritzen, Adrian R. M. "Maplewood Academy I, Maplewood Makes its Mark, Maplewood Academy II." In Saints of the Northern Star. Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005.

Lewis, C. C. "The Minnesota Conference School." ARH, December 17, 1888.

"Maplewood Academy." ARH, March 29, 1906.

Ortner, I. G. "Notice." Northern Union Reaper, July 17, 1928.

Parke, Kathy Joy. 1862-2012, From the Wilds of Minnesota ..., 150 years in the Minnesota Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. Buchanan, MI: Kathy Joy Parke, 2012.

Parke, Kathy Joy. Minnesota Seventh-day Adventist History. "Maplewood Academy." www.MNSDAHistory.org/schools/mwa.

Porter, R. C. "Minnesota Conference School." ARH, May 5, 1891.

"Preparatory Schools." Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Battle Creek, Mich.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1889.

Prescott, W. W. "A Conference School In Minnesota." ARH, September 25, 1888.

Sheldon, H. J. "Maplewood Academy." Northern Union Reaper, September 12, 1911.

Willison, C. M. "Education As It Started In The Northern Union." Northern Union Outlook, December 8, 1972.

Notes

  1. D. P. Curtis, " Conference," ARH, July 17, 1879, 31.

  2. D. P. Curtis, " Conference," ARH, July 15, 1880, 61; D. P. Curtis, " Conference," ARH, July 19, 1881, 60; E. A. Wright, "Minnesota Conference," ARH, July 11, 1882, 444, 445; D. P. Curtis, "Proceedings of the Conference," ARH, July 28, 1885, 476; D. P. Curtis, " Conference Proceedings," ARH, July 27, 1886, 477; D. P. Curtis, "The Conference Proceedings," ARH, July 12, 1887, 444.

  3. G. I. B., "Notes of the Recommendations of the General Conference Committee," ARH, May 1, 1888, 281.

  4. D. P. Curtis, "Minnesota Conference Proceedings," ARH, June 26, 1888, 412, 413.

  5. Morse, "Items of Advent Experience During the Past Fifty Years – No. 6," ARH, November 6, 1888, 689, 690.

  6. G. C. Tenney, "The Cause in ," ARH, March 16, 1886, 173-174; G. C. Tenney, "The Work in Minnesota," ARH, August 17, 1886, 523, 524; R. M. Kilgore, "The Minnesota Camp-Meeting," ARH, June 19, 1888, 396; W. W. Prescott, "A Conference School in Minnesota," ARH, September 25, 1888, 618.

  7. W. W. , "A in ," ARH, September 25, 1888, 618; U. Smith, "S. D. Adventist General Conference, Eleventh Day's Proceedings," ARH, November 13, 1888, 712.

  8. W. W. Prescott, "A Conference School In Minnesota," ARH, September 25, 1888, 618; Kan. Conf. Com., "The Kansas Conference School," ARH, October 23, 668; A.D. Olsen, "Minnesota Conference School," ARH, November 27, 1888, 748; "Preparatory Schools," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. (: Review & Herald Publishing Co., 1889), 122.

  9. "Closing College Exercises," ARH, June 26, 1888, 416; W. W. Prescott, "A Conference School In Minnesota," ARH, September 25, 1888, 618; A. D. Olsen, "Minnesota Conference School," ARH, November 27, 1888, 748; A. W. Spalding, "Obituaries, Prof. C. C. Lewis," ARH, November 27, 1924, 22; Arthur Whitefield Spalding, Origin and History of Seventh-day Adventists (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1962), vol. 2, 53; Lora E. Clement, "Life Sketch of Mrs. C. C. Lewis," ARH, May 13, 1915, 14-15; Michigan Department of Community Health, Division of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, MI, USA, Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867-1952, Film: 49, Film Description: 1893 Gratiot-1893 Muskegon, Record Number 1059, "Westphal, Elsie M.," Ancestry.com, accessed January15, 2020, http://ancestry.com; E. S. Ballenger, "Young People's Missionary Volunteer Convention, San Fernando, Cal., March 2-7, 1909," Pacific Union Recorder, April 1, 1909, 1; W. H. Branson, "Daylight, Tenn.," Field Tidings, November 4, 1914, 3; Arthur Whitefield Spalding, Captains of the Host (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949), 386, 387; Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 206.

  10. "Preparatory Schools," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. (: Review & Herald Publishing Co., 1889), 43; C. C. Lewis, "The Beginning of Union College," The Sligonian, February, 1921, 16, 17; Minnesota, Marriages Index, 1849-1950 [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011,

    FHL Film Number: 1379160, "Griffis, Myrtle G.," Ancestry.com, accessed January14, 2020, http://ancestry.com; J. E. Fulton, "Mrs. C. E. Parker obituary," ARH, August 16, 1934, 21; J. E. Fulton, "C. E. Parker obituary," ARH, September 11, 1939, 7.

  11. "Edward Alexander Sutherland obituary," ARH, July 28, 1955, 27.

  12. R. C. Porter, "Minnesota Conference School," ARH, May 5, 1891, 283; C. E. Weniger, "Anna Weller Norton obituary," ARH, June 22, 1944, 21-22; "Mrs. M. W. Newton obituary," Pacific Union Recorder, May 10, 1944, 5; "Future Teachers Organize," Pacific Union Recorder," November 15, 1944, 2; "Myron Wallace Newton obituary," Pacific Union Recorder, July 25, 1960, 14; Lora E. Clement, "Let's Talk It Over," Youth's Instructor, March 12, 1940, 2; "Newton Hall," Pacific Union Recorder, June 4, 1951, 3.

  13. Porter, "Minnesota Conference School." J. W. Christian, "Fred Norton obituary," Northern Union Outlook, January 16, 1945, 8.

  14. W. W. Prescott, "Report of the Educational Secretary," Review and Herald Extra, Daily Bulletin of the General Conference, March 9, 1891, 38-40.

  15. "The Adventist School," The Minneapolis Tribune, October 1, 1889, 2; "Minneapolis Globules," St. Paul Daily Globe, October 1, 1889, 3.

  16. Porter, "Minnesota Conference School."

  17. N. W. Allee, "Minnesota Conference Proceedings," ARH, July 11, 1893, 444; N. W. Allee, "Minnesota Institutes," ARH, March 6, 1894, 158; N. W. Allee, "Minnesota," ARH, March 13, 1894, 172; D. P. Curtis, "Minnesota Conference Proceedings," ARH, July 3, 1894, 427; M. W. Winchell, "Our Conference School," The Minnesota Worker, January 22, 1895, 1-2; N. W. Allee, " Conference Proceedings," ARH, June 25, 1895, 413; N. W. Allee, "Minnesota Conference Proceedings," ARH, July 7, 1896, 428; Students, "Our School," The Minnesota Worker, March 31, 1897, 1, 2; C. W. Flaiz, "The School," The Minnesota Worker, November 10, 1897, 1; "The Canvassers' School," The Minnesota Worker, March 16, 1898, 1; C. W. Flaiz, "Canvassers' School and Institute," The Minnesota Worker, March 30, 1898, 1; C. W. Flaiz, "Shall Minnesota Have A School?," The Minnesota Worker, November 9, 1898, 1.

  18. H. M. Tippett, "Elder C. A. Burman obituary," ARH, March 28, 1940, 23; "Emma Collins Ellis obituary," ARH, February 22, 1951, 23; F. A. Detamore, "A Remarkable ," ARH, April 21, 1938, 21-22.

  19. C. M. Willison, "Education As It Started in the Northern Union," Outlook, December 8, 1972, 2-3; M. B. D., "Church Schools," The Advocate, February, 1899, 88; E. L. Neff, "Elder Francis Arthur Detamore obituary," North Pacific Union Gleaner, January 3, 1939, 7; E. L. Neff, "Elder F. A. Detamore obituary," ARH, January 19, 1939, 22.

  20. C. W. Flaiz, "Shall Have A School?," The Worker, November 9, 1898, 1.

  21. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in (, : The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 205-209; "Sanborn Insurance Map, ," November, 1904, provided by Anoka County Historical Society, .

  22. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 205-209; Maud Weseman, "Items," The Advocate, February 1900, 57; F. A. Detamore, "Extracts From The Letters Of Church-School Teachers," The Advocate, April 1, 1900, 127; "Items," The Advocate, July 1900, 237; E. L. Neff, "Elder Francis Arthur Detamore obituary," North Pacific Union Gleaner, January 3, 1939, 7; E. L. Neff, "Elder F. A. Detamore obituary," ARH, January 19, 1939, 22; "Minnesota Industrial School," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herlad Publishing Association, 1904), 82; "Frances Mildred Kennedy obituary," ARH, December 26, 1957, 26; W. C. Moffett, "Frances Mildred Kennedy obituary," Columbia Union Visitor, March 6, 1958, 7; G. B. Tripp, "Minnesota," ARH, May 30, 1893, 345; "Worker's Directory," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Battle Creek, Mich.: General Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 1893), 17; "Myron Alonzo Winchell obituary," Pacific Union Recorder, March 10, 1937, 6; J. R. Patterson, "Arthur Moon obituary," ARH, February 6, 1930, 29; "May Ellen Knowleton Moon obituary," ARH, May 24, 1945, 18; "Otto Julius Graf obituary," Lake Union Herald, October 31, 1950, 1; Robert Kitto, "Elder Harold J. Sheldon obituary," Northern Union Outlook, August 26, 1966, 15; Northern Union Reaper, April 24, 1906, 8; W. W. Ruble, "Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, October 22, 1912, 2; "Maplewood Academy," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C..: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 162; "Minnesota Conference," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: The General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1904), 39; C. C. Lewis, "The Church-School Work in the Northwestern and Southwestern Union Conferences," ARH, September 10, 1901, 592; F. A. Detamore, "Progress Department," The Advocate, November, 1901, 302; H. W. Cottrell, "Elder E. W. Catlin obituary," ARH, September 7, 1916, 23.

  23. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 205-209; "Minnesota Industrial School," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: The General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1904), 82; G. F. Eichman, "Elder M. B. Van Kirk obituary," Northern Union Outlook, September 7, 1943, 6, 7; J. M. Mershon, "Wavie D. Tubbs obituary," Northern Union Outlook, September 4, 1951, 8; "College of Liberal Arts Class Roll," The Educational Messenger, Commencement Number, June 1923, 7-8; R. L. Benton, "Among the Churches," Northern Union Reaper, November 6, 1917, 3; "Oak Park Academy," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1919), 204 and similar entries for 1920 and 1921.

  24. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in (: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 205-209; F. A. Detamore, "Extracts From The Letters Of Church-School Teachers," The Advocate, April 1, 1900, 127; "Minnesota Industrial School Student List 1903-1904," MNSDAHistory.org, accessed online February 3, 2020, http://mnsdahistory.org/schools/mis/.

  25. H. F. Phelps, "Minnesota Conference, Devotion and Business Combined," ARH, December 16, 1902, 19; R. A. Underwood, "Minnesota Camp-Meeting," ARH, June 16, 1904, 14; ARH, October 13, 1904, 24; "Maplewood Academy," ARH, March 29, 1906, 21; O. O. Bernstein, "Maplewood (Minn) Academy," The Educational Messenger, November 15, 1905, 1-2; "Intermediate Schools, Statistical Information Regarding S. D. A. Educational Institutions, Maplewood," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 118 and similar entries in subsequent years; "Maplewood Academy – Historical," Twenty-first Annual Announcement, Maplewood Academy Calendar, (Maple Plain, Minnesota: Maplewood Academy, 1924-1925 and 1925-1926), 7.

  26. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 209-212; "Maplewood Industrial School," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1905), 94; The Maple Log (Maplewood Academy, Hutchinson, MN, 1954), 6, accessed online January 28, 2020, http://mnsdahistory.org/schools/mwa/yearbooks/; Russell G. Lucht, "Otto O. Bernstein obituary," Northern Union Outlook, March 25, 1966, 10; "Myrtle Franklin Bernstein obituary," ARH, May 28, 1959, 24; "Caroline S. Hopkins obituary," ARH, March 27, 1958, 26; "Intermediate Schools, Maplewood Industrial School," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1905), 94 and similar entries in subsequent years; "Educational Institutions, Oak Park Academy, Lena Rosenthal," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1918), 197 and similar entry for 1919; "Educational Institutions, Sheyenne River Academy, Lena Rosenthal," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 235 and similar entries for 1921 and 1922; "Educational Institutions, Plainview Academy, Lena Rosenthal," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1923), 200 and similar entries for 1924 and 1925; "Educational Institutions, Maplewood Academy, Lena Rosenthal," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1927), 253 and similar entries for 1928 and 1929; J. M. Mershon, "Wavie D. Tubbs obituary," Northern Union Outlook, September 4, 1951, 8; Robert Kitto, " Elder Harold J. Sheldon obituary," Northern Union Outlook, August 26, 1966, 15; Year: 1900, Census Place: Lyra, Blue Earth, Minnesota, Page: 10, Enumeration District: 0014, FHL microfilm: 1240757, "Campbell, Ralph," Ancestry.com, accessed January 23, 2020, http://ancestry.com; Minnesota Historical Society, Minnesota State Population Census Schedules, 1865-1905, St. Paul, MN, USA: Minnesota Historical Society, 1977, Microfilm, Reels 1-47 and 107-164, "Campbell, Ralph E.." Ancestry.com, accessed January 23, 2020, http://ancestry.com.

  27. "Field Notes," ARH, August 17, 1905, 18; O. O. Bernstein, "Maplewood (Minn) Academy," The Educational Messenger, November 15, 1905, 1-2; "Maplewood Academy," ARH, March 29, 1906, 21; H. S. Shaw, "Minnesota Camp Meeting, President's Address," Northern Union Reaper, June 26, 1906, 2; S. E. Jackson, "Maplewood Farm," Northern Union Reaper, January 8, 1907, 4, 5; W. W. Ruble, "A Visit To Our Academies," Northern Union Reaper, July 5, 1907, 2; "Maplewood Academy," The Educational Messenger, December 20, 1907, 3; "Denominational Institutions–Table No. 2," Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions for the Year Ending December 31, 1910 (Takoma Park Station, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1910) 16; W. W. Ruble, "A Visit To Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, December 27, 1910, 6, 7; S. E. Jackson, "Minnesota Conference, Shall We Have More Room At Maplewood?," Northern Union Reaper, February 14, 1911, 6-7; S. E. Jackson, "Minnesota Conference, A New Dormitory," Northern Union Reaper, March 7, 1911, 4-5; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, March 28, 1911, 7; T. D. G., "Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, April 4, 1911, 6; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, May 2, 1911, 7; "Minnesota Conference, The Campmeeting," Northern Union Reaper, June 20, 1911, 5-6; S. E. Jackson, "The Bemidji Camp-Meeting, What Has Been Accomplished Thus Far," Northern Union Reaper, July 18, 1911, 6, 7; S. E. Jackson, "Minnesota Conference–The New Chapel and Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, August 1, 1911, 6, 7; S. E. Jackson, "Minnesota Conference, Among the Churches," Northern Union Reaper, August 22, 1911, 5; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, September 12, 1911, 7; "Maplewood Academy Notes," Northern Union Reaper, October 3, 1911, 7; W. W. Ruble, "Plainview and Maplewood Academies," Northern Union Reaper, October 17, 1911, 2, 3; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, October 31, 1911, 7; "Maplewood Academy Notes," Northern Union Reaper, December 5, 1911, 7; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, July 6, 1915, 8; "Maplewood Academy Notes," Northern Union Reaper, August 17, 1915, 4; M. B. Van Kirk, "Our Academies," Northern Union Reaper, October 5, 1915, 2, 3; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, March 20, 1917, 5; W. H. Edwards, "Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, May 1, 1917, 8; A. F. Schmidt, "A Visit To Our Schools," Northern Union Reaper, November 4, 1919, 1; "Minnesota Notes," Northern Union Reaper, November 11, 1919, 4; S. D. Hartwell, "Attention," Northern Union Reaper, October 26, 1920, 3; H. M. Hiatt, "Minnesota School Notes," Northern Union Reaper, September 27, 1921, 7; "Maplewood Academy–Historical, Buildings and Grounds" Twenty-first Annual Announcement, Maplewood Academy Calendar, (Maple Plain, Minnesota: Maplewood Academy, 1924-1925 and 1925-1926), 7, 8.

  28. H. J. Sheldon, "Minnesota Conference, Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, September 12, 1911, 6, 7; W. W. Ruble, "Plainview and Maplewood Academies," Northern Union Reaper, October 17, 1911, 2, 3; "Course of Study," Twenty-first Annual Announcement, Maplewood Academy Calendar, (Maple Plain, Minnesota: Maplewood Academy, 1924-1925 and 1925-1926), 22-28.

  29. O. O. Bernstein, "Maplewood (Minn) Academy," The Educational Messenger, November 15, 1905, 1, 2.

  30. "Maplewood News Notes," Northern Union Reaper, August 30, 1927, 4; "Maplewood News," Northern Union Reaper, March 6, 1928, 6.

  31. O. O. Bernstein, "Maplewood Academy," ARH, June 21, 1906, 20; Ernest Sheldon and Roy C. Livingston, "Minnesota, Young Mens' Mission Band," Northern Union Reaper, December 18, 1906, 7, 8; R. A. Hare, "Report of Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, August 31, 1915, 5.

  32. O. O. Bernstein, "Maplewood Academy," ARH, June 21, 1906, 20.

  33. "Section 4–Educational Institutions," Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions–The Fifty-eighth Annual Statistical Report (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1920) 14; "Section 4–Educational Institutions," Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions–The Sixty-fifth Annual Report (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1927) 14.

  34. "Maplewood Academy – Graduates" Twenty-first Annual Announcement, Maplewood Academy Calendar, (Maple Plain, Minnesota: Maplewood Academy, 1924-1925 and 1925-1926), 43.

  35. Dr. Elmer J. Martinson, "Dr. Carl J. Martinson obituary," Northern Union Outlook, September 22, 1972, 11; Kathy Joy Parke, personal knowledge from having seen the Adventist historical collection of Carl Martinson that passed to his son Elmer, Kathy also being the beneficiary of some of the collection.

  36. A. W. Kuehl, "Winifred Halverson obituary," Northern Union Reaper, May 2, 1911, 7.

  37. "Maplewood Academy – Graduates" Twenty-first Annual Announcement, Maplewood Academy Calendar, (Maple Plain, Minnesota: Maplewood Academy, 1924-1925 and 1925-1926), 43.

  38. "Educational Report," Northern Union Reaper, September 18, 1906, 6; H. M. Hiatt, "Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Reaper, November 27, 1917, 5.

  39. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), iii, iv, x, 217-219; Jeffrey Lauritzen (son of Adrian and Evelyn Lauritzen), email message to author, January 26, 2020; Composite 1940 Class Picture, Maplewood Academy, Hutchinson, MN; "Dedication," The Maple Log (Hutchinson, MN: Maplewood Academy, 1944), 6-7 and 14, accessed online January 28, 2020, http://mnsdahistory.org/schools/mwa/yearbooks/; Debbie Barr, "Maplewood Alumni Visit Campus," Mid-America Adventist Outlook, November 27, 1980, 11; Kathy Joy Parke, personal knowledge due to being a cousin of Evelyn Lauritzen; Kathy Joy Parke, personal knowledge due to having in her possession the Alumnus of the Year plaque awarded to Dr. Adrian Lauritzen inscribed "Mr. Maplewood, Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, In Honor of Your 50 Years of Loving Service & Dedication for Maplewood Academy, October 5, 1985".

  40. R. A. Underwood, "They All Shall Be Taught Of God," "Report of the President," "A Statement," Northern Union Reaper, February 22, 1910, 1-7; R. A. Underwood, "The Danish-Norwegian Seminary," ARH, February 17, 1910, 15-16; "The Danish-Norwegian Seminary," Northern Union Reaper, October 4, 1910, 2; M. Ellsworth Olsen, A History of the Origin and Progress of Seventh-day Adventists Second ed. (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 693, 694.

  41. "Denominational Institutions–Table 2, Section 1–Educational Institutions, "Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions–Forty-ninth Annual Statistical Report (Takoma Park Station, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911) 12.

  42. "Seminary Will Build," Hutchinson Leader, August 24, 1917; M. L. Andreasen, "Hutchinson Seminary," Northern Union Reaper, August 28, 1917, 1; "New Start For The Seminary," Hutchinson Leader, September 14, 1917, 1; "Seminary Notes," Northern Union Reaper, February 19, 1918, 5; "17 Teachers At Seminary," Hutchinson Leader, September 27, 1918, 1; "Hutchinson Theological Seminary," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 224.

  43. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 191-213, 223, 272-273; "Denominational Institutions–Table 2, Section 4–Educational Institutions, "Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions–The Fifty-sixth Annual Statistical Report (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1918) 11; "Denominational Institutions–Table 2, Section 4–Educational Institutions, "Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions–The Fifty-seventh Annual Statistical Report (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1919) 15; "Denominational Institutions–Table 2, Section 4–Educational Institutions, "Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions –The Sixty-fifth Annual Report (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1927) 14; General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, "Hutchinson Theological Seminary," Two Hundred Eighth Meeting, General Conference Committee, May 2, 1928, 554-555; General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, "Hutchinson Theological Seminary," Two Hundred Eighteenth Meeting, General Conference Committee, May 31, 1928, 578-579; "Notice" and "Minnesota Items," Northern Union Reaper, July 17, 1928, 1-2 and 7; Martin S. Reppe, "Ample Opportunity For Norwegians and Danes At Hutchinson," Northern Union Reaper, July 24, 1928, 2.

  44. I. G. Ortner, "Notice," Northern Union Reaper, July 17, 1928, 1, 2; "Minnesota Items," Northern Union Reaper, July 17, 1928, 7; "Hutchinson Theological Seminary" and "Maplewood Academy," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1928), 267, 268, 272; "Maplewood Academy," Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1929), 281.

  45. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 223, 224; Kathy Joy Parke, personal knowledge of Maplewood Academy at Hutchinson from visiting various years and attending 1969-1973; "Maplewood Academy News," Northern Union Outlook, January 31, 1939, 5; J. V. Peters, "A New Industry At Maplewood," Northern Union Outlook, November 27, 1945, 6; Kathy Joy Parke, personal knowledge about the craft shop and broom factory from conversations with Kathy's mother, Myrna Joyce (Andersen) Parker who worked in the broom factory; "Report From Maplewood," Northern Union Outlook, March 12, 1946, 7, 8; "Craftshop and Repair Shop," The Maple Log (Maplewood Academy, Hutchinson, MN, 1941), 6, accessed online January 28, 2020, http://mnsdahistory.org/schools/mwa/yearbooks/.

  46. "Denominational Institutions–Table 2, Section 1–Educational Institutions, Part 2–Academies in North America," Ninety-third Annual Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1955) 20.

  47. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 224, 225; C. V. Anderson, "Maplewood Academy Plans," Northern Union Reaper, February 19, 1946, 6, 7; "Report From Maplewood," Northern Union Outlook, March 12, 1946, 7, 8.

  48. Mrs. Irmgard S. Hooper, "Maplewood Academy News," Northern Union Outlook, April 1, 1958, 5, 6.

  49. Mrs. Ivan Groulik, "First Services in the Hutchinson Church," Northern Union Outlook, May 9, 1961, 10; Mrs. Edwin H. Peterson, "Hutchinson Church History," Northern Union Outlook, June 7, 1968, 12, 13.

  50. C. H. Lauda, "Boyd Olson Appointed Educational Secretary, Far Eastern Division," Northern Union Outlook, May 2, 1961, 6; "Seniors," The Maple Log (Hutchinson, MN: Maplewood Academy, 1942), 31, accessed online January 28, 2020, http://mnsdahistory.org/schools/mwa/yearbooks/; "Maplewood Academy Principals," MNSDAHistory.org, accessed online January 28, 2020, http://mnsdahistory.org/schools/mwa/principals/.

  51. C. A. Edwards, "Impressions of Maplewood Academy," Northern Union Outlook, February 7, 1961, 6, 7; C. H. Lauda, "Report From Minnesota," Northern Union Reaper, February 19, 1963, 9; "45 Bare Rooms Need Furnishings," Northern Union Outlook, March 19, 1963, 4, 5.

  52. Lewis O. Anderson, "Auditorium Under Construction," Northern Union Outlook, April 28, 1967, 6, 7; J. L. Dittberner, "Minnesota Holds Full-Scale Camp Meeting Again!" Northern Union Outlook, July 14, 1967, 12.

  53. Lyle C. Anderson, "Maplewood Academy Fall School Term," Northern Union Outlook, August 30, 1968, 2, 3; Arthur Kiesz, "A Brief Report," Northern Union Outlook, October 3, 1969, 5, 6.

  54. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Saints of the Northern Star, Seventh-day Adventism in Minnesota (Maple Grove, MN: The Minnesota Conference Association of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005), 224-227; "State Listings, Minnesota, McLeod County, Maplewood Academy" National Register of Historic Places, accessed online January 30, 2020, http://www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/mn/mcleod/state.html; "Part III–Department of the Interior, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Annual Listing of Historic Properties, Notice," Federal Register (Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, March 5, 1985), 8902, accessed online January 30, 2020, https://books.google.com/books?id=uS_8TRpifwwC&lpg=PA8902&dq=Maplewood%20Academy%20National%20Register&pg=PA8902#v=onepage&q=Maplewood%20Academy&f=false.

  55. "New MWA Administration Building Voted," Northern Union Outlook, August 21, 1978, 10.

  56. "Ground Broken for New Administration Building," Northern Union Outlook, July 2, 1979, 8.

  57. "Farewell Old Ad Building," Northern Union Outlook, March 3, 1980, 6; Evelyn Johnson Swanson, "Farewell to the Old ... Welcome to the New," MWA Alumni Today, Spring, 1980, 3-5, 9.

  58. Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, "Another Maplewood Milestone," Northern Union Outlook, February 4, 1980, 8; Kathy Joy Parke, personal knowledge as an alumnus of Maplewood Academy.

  59. "Section 1–Educational Institutions, Part 2–Academies in North America," 108th Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1970) 22; "Section 1–Educational Institutions, Part 2–Secondary Schools," 117th Annual Statistical Report (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1979) 24.

  60. "Section 1–Educational Institutions, Part 2–Secondary Schools," 123rd Annual Statistical Report (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1985) 28.

  61. "Section 1–Educational Institutions, Part 2 – Secondary Schools," 124th Annual Statistical Report (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1986) 28 and similar reports for subsequent years.

  62. "Through The Years," Maplewood Academy Alumni Directory (Hutchinson, Minnesota: Maplewood Academy, 2011), 1.

×

Parke, Kathy Joy. "Maplewood Academy." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=89QL.

Parke, Kathy Joy. "Maplewood Academy." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Date of access January 19, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=89QL.

Parke, Kathy Joy (2021, January 09). Maplewood Academy. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved January 19, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=89QL.