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José Nunes Siqueira

Photo courtesy of Brazilian White Center – UNASP.

Siqueira, José Nunes (1917–2005)

By The Brazilian White Center – UNASP

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The Brazilian White Center – UNASP is a team of teachers and students at the Brazilian Ellen G. White Research Center – UNASP at the Brazilian Adventist University, Campus Engenheiro, Coelho, SP. The team was supervised by Drs. Adolfo Semo Suárez, Renato Stencel, and Carlos Flávio Teixeira. Bruno Sales Gomes Ferreira provided technical support. The following names are of team members: Adriane Ferrari Silva, Álan Gracioto Alexandre, Allen Jair Urcia Santa Cruz, Camila Chede Amaral Lucena, Camilla Rodrigues Seixas, Daniel Fernandes Teodoro, Danillo Alfredo Rios Junior, Danilo Fauster de Souza, Débora Arana Mayer, Elvis Eli Martins Filho, Felipe Cardoso do Nascimento, Fernanda Nascimento Oliveira, Gabriel Pilon Galvani, Giovana de Castro Vaz, Guilherme Cardoso Ricardo Martins, Gustavo Costa Vieira Novaes, Ingrid Sthéfane Santos Andrade, Isabela Pimenta Gravina, Ivo Ribeiro de Carvalho, Jhoseyr Davison Voos dos Santos, João Lucas Moraes Pereira, Kalline Meira Rocha Santos, Larissa Menegazzo Nunes, Letícia Miola Figueiredo, Luan Alves Cota Mól, Lucas Almeida dos Santos, Lucas Arteaga Aquino, Lucas Dias de Melo, Matheus Brabo Peres, Mayla Magaieski Graepp, Milena Guimarães Silva, Natália Padilha Corrêa, Rafaela Lima Gouvêa, Rogel Maio Nogueira Tavares Filho, Ryan Matheus do Ouro Medeiros, Samara Souza Santos, Sergio Henrique Micael Santos, Suelen Alves de Almeida, Talita Paim Veloso de Castro, Thais Cristina Benedetti, Thaís Caroline de Almeida Lima, Vanessa Stehling Belgd, Victor Alves Pereira, Vinicios Fernandes Alencar, Vinícius Pereira Nascimento, Vitória Regina Boita da Silva, William Edward Timm, Julio Cesar Ribeiro, Ellen Deó Bortolotte, Maria Júlia dos Santos Galvani, Giovana Souto Pereira, Victor Hugo Vaz Storch, and Dinely Luana Pereira.

 

 

First Published: January 29, 2020

José Nunes Siqueira was born November 6, 1917,1 in the city of Guararema, state of São Paulo, Brazil.2 He was son of Benedito Nunes de Siqueira and Rita Siqueira, from whose union were also born: Inocêncio, Dyone, João, Francisco, and Luiz Nunes Siqueira.3

José spent his childhood in the city of Mogi das Cruzes, state of São Paulo, where he studied at the local school.4 His father died when he was about seven years old and José and his brothers became the main providers for the family. Along with his brother, Francisco, José sold candy in movie theaters, worked as a shoe shiner, and did other jobs.5

In 1932 the evangelist Jerônimo Granero Garcia arrived in Mogi das Cruzes to hold a series of meetings in the city. Inocêncio, José’s older brother, attended the meetings and accepted Adventism. He was baptized in the first Adventist baptism in the city. Inocêncio shared his new beliefs with José. The first Adventist sermon José heard was preached by Pastor Germano Conrado, and after that he continued to attend Sabbath services. He attended a baptismal class taught by the same pastor, and he was baptized on December 30 1933, by Pastor Ennis Moore in the Tietê river, Mogi das Cruzes6

Even before his baptism, while watching pastors who occasionally visited the church, he developed an appreciation for the ministry.7 Longing to become a pastor, he started praying for a way to find resources to study theology at Brazil College. The answer came when he met Maria Dias, a woman known for helping needy students, who gave him enough money to pay for a year of study. José entered the Adventist Seminary in 1936,8 and he earned his living working as a canvasser during vacations.9 He graduated in 1940.10 He entered into the denominational service in 1941, when he accepted an invitation to pastor the district of Ribeirão Preto, state of São Paulo.11

On January 22, 1941,12 he married Lydia Erna Conrado (1920-?).13 Lydia served alongside her husband. She was a teacher at the elementary school in the countryside of São Paulo and at Brazil College.14 She also worked at the Adventist hospital in Glendale, California, USA, as an electrocardiogram technician.15 In New York, she participated in the van ministry that offered social services and religious help for the community.16 She wrote the book A Saúde Vem da Cozinha (Health Comes from the Kitchen, 1979) which had a great impact on the Brazilian population.17 She also wrote the biblical course “Encontro Com a Vida” (Encounter With Life), that replaced the old one “Curso Universal das Escrituras Sagradas” (Universal Course of the Sacred Scriptures), while she was a director of Escola Rádio Postal of the Voice of Prophecy.18 From their union four children were born: Osilda,19 Celina,20 Bety,21 and Marcius.22

In 1943 José was transferred to pastor in the city of São José do Rio Preto.23 At the same time he also directed the evangelistic radio program “Momentos de Meditação” (Meditation Moments) that was 15 minutes long.24 He stayed there until 1945 when he accepted an invitation to shepherd the church in Santos, a coastal city in the state of São Paulo.25 There he began the construction of a new church and primary school.26

On January 12, 1946, José was ordained to the pastoral ministry. In the same year he accepted the invitation to be dean at Brazil College.27 At the end of 1946 he became director of the Education and Youth Departments at the São Paulo Conference and stayed in this position until 1951, at which time he helped to organize the first youth camp in Brazil, held on the campus of São Paulo Academy.28

In August 1951 he moved with his family to the city of Pendleton, Oregon, the United States. After studying for a trimester at Walla Walla College to improve his English,29 he was invited by Pastor Roberto Rabello to move to Glendale, California, to help in the recording of the Voice of Prophecy programs in Portuguese.30

The family returned to Brazil on December 26, 1953. At the beginning of 1952, during the quadrennial meetings of the South Brazil Union Conference, José was invited by Pastors Roberto Rabelo and Rodolfo Belz, president of the East Brazil Union Conference, to manage the Escola Rádio Postal of the Voice of Prophecy, headquartered in the city of Niterói, state of Rio de Janeiro.31 He stayed in this position until 1954 when he was appointed as president of Paraná-Santa Catarina Conference.32

In 1958 he became director of the Education and Youth Departments for the South Brazilian Union Conference. During the six years that he was in this position, he undertook important projects for the Adventist youth.33 Along with Pastors Jairo Araújo and Francisco N. Siqueira, he planned the first Youth Leadership Course in Brazil, with the goal of preparing leaders for the denomination (1958).34 He was also participated in organizing the first South Brazil Congress of Adventist Youth, from July 28 to August 1, 1959, at Brazil College. The motto for the congress was “Christ to the Multitudes.”35

In 1964 José accepted an invitation to be director of the Public Relations Department of Brazil College.36 He worked at this position until the end of 1965, when he and his family again went to the United States.37

They arrived in Los Angeles on December 21 and soon settled in Glendale, California. In January 1966 he was invited by Pastor Samuel Weiss, coordinator of evangelism for Hispanics in Los Angeles, to be the speaker for a three-month evangelistic campaign. In June 1966, during the General Conference Session in Detroit, Michigan, he accepted Pastor Sandefur’s invitation to be one of the associate pastors of the Spanish American Adventist Church in Los Angeles.38 He stayed in this position until 1968 when he was invited by Pastor Lowell L. Bock, president of the Southern New England Conference to pastor two Portuguese-American churches in the cities of New Bedford and Fall River, Massachusetts.39

Early in 1972, Pastor Wilson Sarli, president of São Paulo Conference, called José back to Brazil to pastor a church of college students in the city of São Carlos, in the state of São Paulo. He accepted the invitation and returned to Brazil in July 1972.40 He was in town for only six months when he was made sales manager for the Brazilian Publishing House in the beginning of 1973.41 In February 1975 he accepted the position of managing director of the Voice of Prophecy, headquartered in Rio de Janeiro.42

In December 1976 José returned to the United States to pastor the Hispanic and Portuguese-Brazilian churches in the Queens neighborhood in New York City. The family arrived in May 1977,43 and he retired four years later in 1981.44

While retired, José continued to dedicate himself to preaching the gospel. He worked as volunteer chaplain for one year at Orlando Adventist Hospital, in Orlando, Florida. Later, he and his wife headed an evangelistic work among Hispanics in Deltona, Florida, that resulted in the founding of the Hispanic Adventist Church of Deltona on April 13, 1985.45 In 1986, he moved with his wife to Deep Creek, Florida, and he served as elder of the Adventist Church of Port Charlotte.46 He died in 2005, at the age of 87, in Miami, Florida.47

José Nunes Siqueira’s contribution to the Adventist Church was beneficial in Brazil—especially among young people. In the United States, his service was important for preaching the gospel to Hispanics. Altogether, he served the Seventh-day Adventist Church for more than 40 years.

Sources

“Continua Ativo,” Revista Adventista, year 78, n. 12, December 1983, 36. Accessed August 30, 2016, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

“José Nunes Siqueira.” National Center of Adventist History (Online), January 12, 2016.

“José N. Siqueira.” Revista Adventista, year 100, n. 3, March 2005, 37. Accessed August 24, 2016, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

“Lydia Nunes Siqueira.” National Center of Adventist History (Online), January 12, 2016.

Nigri, M. S. “Bienais na União Sul,” Revista Adventista, year 53, n. 5, May 1958, 26. Accessed August 30, 2016, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

Nigri, Moisés S. “Coluna Paulista - O Departamento de Rádio da Associação Paulista.” Revista Adventista, year 39, n. 1, January 1944, 8. Accessed October 5, 2017, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

Siqueira, José N. “A 7ª Região Missionária em Ação.” Revista Adventista, year 37, n. 3, March 1942, 12. Accessed October 5, 2017, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

Siqueira, José N. “A Semente do Céu é Lançada na Terra.” Revista Adventista, year 38, n. 4, April 1948, 11. Accessed October 5, 2017, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

Siqueira José N. “Congresso Sul-Brasileiro da Juventude Adventista.” Revista Adventista, year 54, n. 12, December 1959, 25-27. Accessed October 5, 2017, http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

Siqueira, José Nunes, Átomos da Paz. Santo André, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, s/d.

Siqueira, José Nunes, De Engraxate a Pastor. Miami, FL: author’s edition, s/d.

Siqueira, José Nunes, Solucionando Problemas. São Paulo, SP: Graphic Department of Brazil College, 1991.

Siqueira, José Nunes, Visões Apocalípticas. São Paulo, SP: Adventista Universitária, 1991

Notes

  1. José Nunes Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor (Miami, FL: author’s edition, s/d.), 53.

  2. “José Nunes Siqueira,” National Center of Adventist History, January 12, 2016, accessed August 28, 2016, http://www.memoriaadventista.com.br/wikiasd/index.php?title=Jos%C3%A9_Nunes_Siqueira.

  3. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 15-17.

  4. Ibid., 9.

  5. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 16-17; and Elis Siqueira, interviewed by Renato Stencel, Engenheiro Coelho, São Paulo, Ellen G. White Research Center, October 25, 2016.

  6. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 17-22.

  7. Ibid., 20.

  8. Ibid., 24-25.

  9. Ibid., 34-47.

  10. Ibid., 183.

  11. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 67-69; José N. Siqueira, “A 7ª Região Missionária em Ação,” Revista Adventista, year 37, n. 3, March 1942, 12; and José N. Siqueira, “A Semente do Céu é Lançada na Terra,” Revista Adventista, year 38, n. 4, April 1948, 11.

  12. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 65-68.

  13. Ibid., 21; “Lydia Nunes Siqueira,” National Center of Adventist History, January 12, 2016, accessed August 28, 2016, http://www.memoriaadventista.com.br/wikiasd/index.php?title=Lydia_Nunes_Siqueira.

  14. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 82, 94.

  15. Ibid., 123-124.

  16. Ibid., 166.

  17. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 148; Lydia Nunes Siqueira, A saúde vem da cozinha (Santo André, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 1979), 232.

  18. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 161.

  19. Ibid., 73.

  20. Ibid., 89.

  21. Ibid., 97.

  22. Ibid., 105-106.

  23. Ibid., 76-78.

  24. Moisés S. Nigri, “Coluna Paulista - O Departamento de Rádio da Associação Paulista,” Revista Adventista, year 39, n. 1, January 1944, 8.

  25. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 86.

  26. Ibid., 88-89.

  27. Ibid., 89-90.

  28. Ibid., 93-95.

  29. Ibid., 99.

  30. Ibid., 101-103.

  31. Ibid., 106-107.

  32. Ibid., 108-111.

  33. Ibid., 112.

  34. Ibid., 116; and M. S. Nigri, “Bienais na União Sul,” Revista Adventista, year 53, n. 5, May 1958, 26.

  35. José N. Siqueira, “Congresso Sul-Brasileiro da Juventude Adventista,” Revista Adventista, year 54, n. 12, December 1959, 25-27.

  36. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 118.

  37. Ibid., 121-123.

  38. Ibid., 125-128.; and “General Conference Committee – authorization given to meet in Detroit…” General Conference Committee minutes, June 1966, 2.

  39. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 132.

  40. Ibid., 139.

  41. Ibid., 141.

  42. Ibid., 151.

  43. Ibid., 161-163.

  44. Ibid., 165-168.

  45. “Continua Ativo,” Revista Adventista, year 78, n.12, December 1983, 36; and Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 172-173.

  46. Siqueira, De Engraxate a Pastor, 173-177.

  47. “José Siqueira,” Revista Adventista, year 100, no. 3, March 2005, 37.

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UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Siqueira, José Nunes (1917–2005)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed August 03, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8GP6.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Siqueira, José Nunes (1917–2005)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Date of access August 03, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8GP6.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center – (2020, January 29). Siqueira, José Nunes (1917–2005). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved August 03, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8GP6.