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Vera (Mosebar) White, Dallas R. White, 1926 passport photo.

Photo courtesy of Susan D. Patt. Also in the "Adventism in China (AIC)" Digital Image Repository.

White, Dallas Robert (1900–1964) and Vera Ann (Mosebar) (1901–1931); later, Florence Grace (Numbers) (1904–1986)

By Susan D. Patt, and Milton Hook

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Susan Davis Patt is a retired professor from La Sierra University’s Department of Art & Design. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and published in UPPERCASE Magazine. She enjoys historical and family research, and like her grandfather, Dallas White, has been involved in music for most of her life. Susan and her husband, Stephen Patt, now live in a remote area of Southeastern Arizona. 

Milton Hook, Ed.D. (Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, the United States). Hook retired in 1997 as a minister in the Greater Sydney Conference, Australia. An Australian by birth Hook has served the Church as a teacher at the elementary, academy and college levels, a missionary in Papua New Guinea, and as a local church pastor. In retirement he is a conjoint senior lecturer at Avondale College of Higher Education. He has authored Flames Over Battle Creek, Avondale: Experiment on the Dora, Desmond Ford: Reformist Theologian, Gospel Revivalist, the Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Series, and many magazine articles. He is married to Noeleen and has two sons and three grandchildren.

First Published: January 8, 2024

Nurses Dallas Robert and Vera (born Mosebar) White pioneered in the late 1920’s in Southwest China where they worked with Claude B. and Victoria (Martin) Miller to establish the first Seventh-day Adventist mission in Yunnan. Vera was tragically murdered in 1931 in the fifth year of their mission service in China. Dallas married Florence Grace Numbers in 1932 and served as a nurse, administrator, and ordained minister until evacuation in 1940, completing a total of 14 years of mission service in China. After returning to the U.S., he served an additional 14 years in the medical field in southern California hospitals.

Early Years

Dallas Robert White was born March 8, 1900, in Mansfield, Ohio, the fourth child in the family of James K. and Charlotte (Hulbert) White. His siblings were Clarence Hulbert (b.1890), Ada Lorena (b.1893), Cecil Pearce (b.1895), and Beatrice Victoria (b.1904).1 It is unknown just when Dallas’ parents left their Baptist roots and converted to Adventism, but by late 1899 they moved from Manitoba, Canada, to an Adventist community in Mansfield, Knox County, Ohio, where James K. White worked as a colporteur selling Adventist books. Dallas’ father continued to colporteur throughout the next 16 years while at times also working as a mechanic and/or farm laborer.

The family moved a number of times during Dallas’ young life, and as a result his early education was acquired in different locations beginning in Madison, Tennessee. While living there, nine-year-old Dallas consecrated his life to “the Master’s service,” and at that early age he made a vow to medical missionary work as he heard Ellen G. White speak and experienced her hand on his head, praying God’s blessing upon him.2 His education continued in Racine, Wisconsin and Battle Creek, Michigan. In 1916 he did colporteuring with his father in Kansas and was baptized by Elder Arther Bringle at the Kansas Camp Meeting that summer.3

Vera Ann Mosebar was born February 5, 1901, in Carleton, Monroe County, Michigan to Adventist parents, Frank and Ella (Choate) Mosebar. She attended grades 5-12 in Adventist schools in Oregon and Washington and was baptized in 1912 by Elder P. A. Hanson.4

Education and Early Married Life

Dallas attended Broadview Theological Seminary in LaGrange, Illinois from 1917-1920 receiving a Teaching Certificate in Piano.5 He furthered his education by studying nursing in California at the St. Helena Sanitarium where he met and fell in love with nursing student, Vera Ann Mosebar, who was working as the sanitarium dietician at the time.6

Vera graduated from St. Helena Sanitarium as a nurse in 1923, and Dallas received his nursing degree in 1924. They married on February 3, 19257 in St. Helena and moved to Washington state where Dallas assisted as a singing evangelist for a crusade at Okanogan after which he completed his Academic Course at Walla Walla College. During this time Vera worked as a surgical nurse at the Walla Walla Sanitarium and Hospital.8

China Mission Service

In the fall of 1926, Dallas and Vera received a call to serve in China. They sailed from San Francisco in December on the SS Shinyo Maru,9 arriving in Shanghai in January of 1927 on the SS Nagasaki Maru.10 Several days later they traveled to Nanking for the study of Mandarin at the Nanking Language School.11 They rented rooms in a house shared with the Ira O. Wallace family near the university. Vera’s letters home chronicled sights, smells, and experiences in a foreign country including mentions of impending danger.

Southern forces are very near us and the Northern soldiers are flooding Nanking…Yesterday we counted about 700 soldiers in our crowd and there were other such crowds marching thru the city to meet the Southerners... They (the local nationals) are very afraid of what may happen here in Nanking.12

Even so, Dallas and Vera’s faith was strong. “We are not worked up or even excited, for we know the Lord will take care of us wherever we are.”13 Little did they know that within a short time they would be caught up in the March 1927 Nanking Incident.14

Vera was one of the first Adventist women evacuated to Shanghai early in the week of March 2, 1927.15 Although not among the seven Adventist men who escaped over the wall from Socony Hill, Dallas and Ira Wallace had their own harrowing experience as they were harassed and chased by soldiers through the streets of Nanking, narrowly escaping execution.16 It was just the first of several similar evacuations entailing abandoning household goods and starting over.

Shortly after the March 8,1928 birth of their daughter, Ardyth Marie, Dallas and Vera began the month-long journey to the Yunnan Province17 where they joined Claude B. and Victoria (Martin) Miller in establishing the new mission and dispensary in the provincial capital of Yunnanfu18 (now Kunming).

In 1930 they had another busy year. Both Dallas and Claude Miller were ordained as ministers at the Yunnan general meeting in early February.19 The two families moved to a new shared house in the northern district and had recently rented a separate group of buildings in the Kweichow Guild, south of town, for a chapel, dispensary, and housing for workers.20 On March 5 Dallas conducted his first baptism,21 and daughter Lorena Jean (called Jean) made her entrance into the world on March 6. Dallas kept busy working at the dispensary four days per week and then returned back home to give Bible Studies. “I have a Bible Class six nights a week…. Am very much in hopes we can have a baptism following this class. We have had but one man baptized this year.”22

The men made short mission trips across Lake Dianchi out into villages of tribes-people who had shown interest in the Adventist message.23 While they were gone on these trips Vera and Victoria were left to run the mission services and care for the dispensary patients. Vera wrote home of her work with a Miao man previously brought to the mission by Evangelist Feng.

…He came to have some of his songs printed so I have been busy trying to help him… I have him translating some songs and he will write them in large characters on some cloth we have for that purpose…These Miao are wonderful singers. I wish you could hear this man. I sing the tune for him and he starts right off…and never misses a note or gets on the wrong key. He writes the tune out, then translates the words from Chinese into his language.24

On January 14, 1931 Dallas and Claude headed out on an extended itinerating trip for Talifu (now Dali) and surrounding Miao villages. Their entire trip would be about seven hundred miles on foot, taking nearly three months to complete.25 They attended to large numbers of villagers, pulling teeth and treating a range of ailments and illnesses while sharing the gospel message.26

Tragedy Strikes

Back at the mission Vera and Victoria experienced trouble with several of their Chinese servants who were suspected of stealing from the mission. The women informed their husbands and families of these challenges and sought advice from the American Consul. Following his counsel, the servants were paid their wages and terminated by March 14.27

Mrs. Miller stayed with Vera while the men were gone. The night of the 15th both women tucked their Bibles under their pillows before going to sleep.28 That same night two of the dismissed male servants purchased an iron axe in town, waited until near midnight, and made their way to the home of the women. One “stood watch” outside the wall while the other made his way to the bedroom where the women were asleep. Using the newly purchased axe he attacked both women.29 The two young children slept in the adjoining room but were not harmed. The following morning servants discovered the brutalized women and called for the American Consul who documented that Vera was deceased but Victoria, although severely injured, was still alive. Victoria was transported to the hospital but died later that afternoon.30

A runner was sent from Talifu to inform their husbands to hasten and immediately return home because something terrible had happened.31 Alternating running with walking they doubled their normal time and covered five miles per hour, hiking sunup to sundown, completing twelve days travel in six and one half days.32 They finally learned that their wives had been tragically murdered, leaving Claude alone and Dallas a widower with two young daughters.

Then was given to us the realization that no smiling face would greet our coming –those faces were not for us to see – we were shielded from that by His mercy.33

The horrific death of these two women missionaries shocked the world with articles and photos appearing on front pages of many newspapers. The funeral on March 26 was attended by missionaries from all denominations and societies, as well as government officials and tribes people.34 With a heavy heart, Dallas wrote to Vera’s parents:

Today, I followed that loved one to her last resting place, out there in the little British American cemetery outside the North Gate. There she awaits the voice of the Great Life-Giver …the show of sympathy from all quarters was nearly overwhelming of itself…My faith has not wavered, but my helpmeet is gone. I miss her sound counsel, her words of encouragement, her brave presence.35

Within a short time, church leaders asked Dallas and Claude for their future plans. A telegram was quickly wired back, “Staying on”.36 Claude continued trips out among tribespeople but Dallas’ days were now filled with care for his two daughters on top of Bible studies and dispensary work. He began to consider taking the girls back to the states to live with their maternal grandparents but was torn with the thought of being apart from them.

The place will be emptier than ever. The absence of their good-night kisses and hugs and incessant daddy this and daddy that will be like another knife thrust, but should something happen, and I had had a chance to send them home, I could never forgive myself.37

Due to sweeping changes at the Division Council, Dallas was persuaded to send the girls to the States and to continue his work in China until his furlough.38 On February 9, 1932 Ardyth and Jean White, under the care of Veda Quade, boarded the President Madison in Shanghai.39 They arrived in Seattle, Washington on February 25 and went to their new home with their maternal grandparents.40

A New Beginning

On March 8, 1932 Dallas married Florence Grace Numbers,41 the music teacher at Far Eastern Academy, and together they traveled to East Szechuan where Dallas took up his new position as director of the East Szechuan Mission. By October of that year, he reported good attendance at an evangelistic series in Du Djia Ho where twelve were enrolled in the baptismal class.42 Even though his entire team worked hard over the next two years, it was difficult to increase the church membership beyond what it had been when he was transferred to this mission.43

Dallas, Florence, and 18-month Bobby sailed from Shanghai in July of 1934, on furlough to the United States,44 where Dallas was reunited with daughters Ardyth and Jean. After the April 16, 1935 birth of youngest daughter, Merrilyn Irene, the entire family returned to China where Dallas was once again assigned a new position. He would oversee construction of the Wuhan Sanitarium-Hospital for a short time and then continue with ministerial duties in the Central China Union. The family would live in a Honan Mission house at Yencheng.45

Along on this return trip were a number of musical instruments that Dallas had collected in hopes of fulfilling his dream of creating a West China Band.46 Music had always played an important role in his life. He had sung solos or in groups since he was young and could play most wind instruments.47 Now he would be able to give music lessons, organize musical groups, and contribute special music.

I haven’t told you about our Orchestra here on the hill. A flute, E flat Alto (sic, Horn), Saxophone, Trombone, 2 cornets, a trumpet, a violin, a B flat Clarinet. We can make quite a joyful noise…A double and single male Chinese quartet. All of them workers and of course educated in the mission’s school.48

During the years in Yencheng, Dallas was able to spend more time with the family but things were soon to change. An opportunity arose in early 1937 for him to join Pastor Ho Ai Deng in opening a station in Western Hunan at Chiencheng among a new Miao tribe.49 Initial attempts at presenting the gospel message were rejected and mocked. Dallas suggested they try a different approach and first treat the medical needs of the people, and patients began to come “at a rate of almost a hundred a day”.50 This broke down prejudice and led to more interest in the gospel. Dallas remained at the Miao Mission for six weeks and then returned home to Yencheng.51 Church leaders were hopeful that this new endeavor would prove similar to the success of gospel work with the Miao of Yunnan. Dallas and Florence expressed their interest in being appointed to this new mission, and their offer was approved.52 However, conditions in Honan delayed fulfillment of this plan.

Back home sounds of war and shelling could be heard at the mission with soldiers being brought to the hospital. Many missionaries were encouraged to leave their homes,53 and in mid-December of 1937 Dallas and family left Yencheng with just what they could carry with them.54 They traveled to Hankow and boarded a refugee train headed to Canton and from there to Hong Kong where many other missionaries had already gathered.55

Within two months it was deemed safe enough for Dallas to return alone to Yencheng while Florence and the children stayed in Hong Kong. Air raid warnings happened daily as he packed the family’s household goods in preparation for the move to the new Miao Mission assignment.56 In late March of 1938 he traveled by boat, along with his baggage and household necessities, for a new life in Western Hunan. Travel was dangerous with government unrest, fighting, and bandits, but Dallas and several workers finally arrived in Soli, Hunan.57 They set up the dispensary and rented space for a new chapel where Pastor Ho Ai Deng began a series of meetings.58 The medical needs at the newly organized Miao Mission were many, and Dallas labored under adverse conditions. It was cold, money and food were running low, and his health began to suffer.59 Union leaders did not believe it yet safe enough for the family to join him. This challenging situation turned into nine long, lonely and stressful months of separation. “Thru all this, all I can do is to retreat to prayer and supplication.…"60

Even so, music still remained important to Dallas. “Thurs aft Nov 4 …I am lonesome for my family…I have 3 boys blowing horns and we are soon to have a singing class. I have 2 real good singers and ½ dozen all ready promised to come—will try to get some special music for the effort....”61

The last known record of Dallas at the Miao Mission is a January 14, 1939 letter he wrote to Florence, telling of his poor health.62 It is unclear just when and why he left the mission, but by spring 1939 Dallas had joined the family in Hong Kong and was involved in other church endeavors.63 The Miao Mission did not yield the great gospel success that was hoped for and finally was disbanded. Instead, work among the Miao tribes of Western Hunan became a part of the broader outreach program of the Hunan Mission.64

Changing residences became a way of life for the Whites as they moved several more times while in Hong Kong. Dallas’ last assignment in China was that of director of the Anhwei Mission in Nanjing in 1940.65 Shortly before receiving the final order to evacuate, he baptized “sixteen smiling believers…happy in the hope of a soon coming Savior."66 On November 20, 1940 the family set sail from Shanghai on the SS Washington67 and landed in San Francisco the following month, marking the end of Dallas’ fourteen years and Florence’s ten years of service in war-torn China.

Return to America

After the 1941 General Conference Session, Dallas received word that they were being given the status of “permanent return,” which would facilitate the “brethren” in assisting him to find service in the homeland.68 A number of letters went back and forth between Dallas and General Conference officials, but no promising positions materialized.69 Again he drew on his faith in God and His promises to take him through these challenging times.

Not once has He failed us. We have every reason to believe that God cares over every one of His children and works out His own plans for their lives. We have firm confidence in Him to Whom we have committed our all.70

Over the next six years the family continued the struggle to find suitable work.71 Dallas spent two years as a nurse anesthetist at the Paradise Valley Sanitarium in National City, California and later worked as a special duty nurse at the Glendale Sanitarium and Hospital.72 In 1946 he assisted Glenn Coon in a New York evangelistic effort.73 The following year while studying at the seminary in Washington D.C., he received a call to become the director of Pisgah Institute in Pisgah, NC.74 In preparation for the move, a freak accident occurred, and Dallas was severely burned.75

The resulting plastic surgery and lengthy recovery put an end to the move to Pisgah. When he was finally able to work again, Dallas began a job in the Urology Clinic of the White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles and continued there until his retirement in 1963.76

Dallas never lost his passion for service. On October 2, 1964 he went on his final mission trip: this time to Mexico with LIGA (Mexico Pan-American League), a mission outreach program from Loma Linda University that provided medical care and educational opportunities to isolated Mexican villages.77 Tragically, the private plane he was on crashed near Hermosillo, Mexico, killing all four of the men on board before they could even begin the project.78 Dallas died as he had lived his life–in service to others. He was interred at Montecito Memorial Park in Colton, California.79

Florence began teaching elementary school in southern California in the early 1950’s.80 She received her elementary teaching certificate from the Pacific Union Conference in 196481 and after the death of Dallas continued teaching first grade at San Gabriel Academy.82 In the 1970’s she spent six years in Hong Kong teaching children of missionaries.83 Florence passed away at Loma Linda, California on May 4, 1986 and was laid to rest alongside Dallas.84

Sources

Appel, G. J. “Hunan Annual Meeting.” China Division Reporter, April 1940.

“Births.” China Division Reporter, August 1935.

Crisler, Clarence C. “In Memoriam.” China Division Reporter, April/May 1931.

Crisler, Clarence C, China’s Borderlands and Beyond, Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing, 1937.

Crisler, Clarence C. “Into the West China Union.” China Division Reporter, August/September 1934.

Crisler, Clarence C. “Ordination Service.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1930.

Crisler, Clarence C. “Transferred to Central China.” China Division Reporter, September, October 1935.

Dallas Robert White and Vera (Mosebar) White, “Biographical Information Blank,” RG 21. Record 114952. General Conference Office of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.

Dallas Robert White (8 Mar 1900–11 Oct 1964) memorial page, Find a Grave Memorial ID 63152876. Accessed 10 July 2023. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/63152876/dallas-robert-white.

Dallas R. White, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file. General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.

“Dallas White Family Letters.” Personal collection of Susan D. Patt. Personal collection items will be placed in the Center for Adventist Research, https://www.centerforadventistresearch.org.

“Departures.” China Division Reporter, July 20, 1934.

Esteb, L. E. “Real Sacrifice.” North Pacific Union Gleaner, July 21, 1931.

“Fifty Future Teachers Receive Credentials.” Pacific Union Recorder, May 9, 1966.

Florence Grace (Numbers) White (11 Feb 1904–4 May 1986) memorial page Find a Grave Memorial ID 175354586, accessed 10 July 2023. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/175354586/florence-grace-white.

Florence (Numbers) White. ARH. July 17, 1986.

“Former Worker Dies on Mission.” Loma Linda University Scope, October 9, 1964.

“Jean (White) Davis Family Tree.” Ancestry.com.

Hall, Stephen T., Besieged: Missionary Soldiers for Christ Trapped in China’s Civil War. Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2023.

Hoffman, Ardyth (White) to Merrilyn (White) Webb, October 28, 2002, Dallas White Family Letters, personal collection of Karen Hill.

“Hunan Mission.” China Division Reporter, June/July, 1937.

Miller, Claude B. “The Yunnan Mission.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1930.

National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland, Record Group 59, Entry A1 205C General Records of the Department of State, Central Decimal Files, 1930-1939, Box 1788, FE 393.1113 White.

Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21, Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file. General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Archives, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926-1971.

Warren, Merritt C. “Central China Union Report.” China Division Reporter, February 1938.

Warren, Merritt C. and Clarence C. Crisler. “Our Fallen Co-workers.” ARH, June 11, 1931.

Webb, Merrilyn (White), China Memories, personal collection of Karen Hill. In 2002 Merrilyn (White) Webb contacted her siblings requesting they write their memories from life in China. Each submitted memories. In addition to these recollections, over the next few years she compiled letters, photographs and personal notes into large notebooks, hereafter known as China Memories. Personal collection items will be placed in the Center for Adventist Research, https://www.centerforadventistresearch.org.

Webb, Merrilyn (White), “Dallas Robert White Biography”, 2002, White Family Papers, personal collection of Karen Hill. Personal collection items will be placed in the Center for Adventist Research, https://www.centerforadventistresearch.org.

White, Dallas Robert. ARH, December 3, 1964.

White, Dallas R. “From Pastor Dallas R. White.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, September 1930.

White, Dallas R. “From Yunnanfu.” China Division Reporter, August/September 1931.

White, Dallas R. “In East Szechwan.” China Division Reporter, November/December 1932.

White, Dallas R., “1939 Daily Journal.” Pacific Press Publishing Association.

White, Dallas Robert. “Jean (White) Davis Family Tree.” Ancestry.com.

White, Dallas R. “Personal Chronology.” Dallas White Family Papers, Personal collection of Susan D. Patt. Personal collection items will be placed in the Center for Adventist Research, https://www.centerforadventistresearch.org.

White, Florence, “Teaching Certificate.” 1964, actual certificate in the personal collection of Karen Hill.

White, Vera M., 1931 Diary, personal collection of Susan D. Patt. The original of 1931 Diary was in the possession of Vera’s daughter Ardyth (White) Hoffman until the 2018 Paradise Fire when her home and all contents were burned. Fortunately some years prior to this copies were made by Ardyth’s sister, Jean (White) Davis, and are now in the personal collection of Susan D. Patt. Personal collection items will be placed in the Center for Adventist Research, https://www.centerforadventistresearch.org.

White, Vera N. (sic). “From Yunnanfu.” China Division Reporter, February 1931.

Woodman, I. J. “Mrs. Dallas R. White.” ARH, June 11, 1931.

Notes

  1. “Dallas Robert White.” FamilySearch, Intellectual Reserve, 2022, accessed April 23, 2022, https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/landscape/LRM2-9XH

  2. Dallas R. White to Brother Cormack, February 12, 1935, GCA Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file; Dallas Robert White and Vera (Mosebar) White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 9, 1926, RG 21, Record 114952General Conference Office of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.

  3. Dallas Robert White and Vera (Mosebar) White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 9, 10, 1926, General Conference Office of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Silver Spring, Maryland, RG 21. Record 114952.

  4. Vera (Mosebar) White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 9, 1926, General Conference Archives.

  5. Dallas Robert White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 10, 1926, General Conference Archives.

  6. Vera (Mosebar) White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 9, 1926, General Conference Archives.

  7. Dallas Robert White, “Jean (White) Davis Family Tree,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 5, 2023, https://www.ancestry.com/familytree/person/tree/103183994/person/220025039259/facts.

  8. Dallas Robert White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 10, 1926, General Conference Archives;

    Vera (Mosebar) White, “Biographical Information Blank,” December 9, 1926, General Conference Archives.

  9. Dallas White to “Dear Folks at Home” (Frank and Ella Mosebar), December 26, 1926, Dallas White Family Letters, personal collection of the author.

  10. Vera White to “Dear Folks at Home,” January 14, 1927 (miswritten as 1926), Dallas White Family Letters, personal collection of the author.

  11. Vera White to “Dear Folks at Home,” January 27, 1927, Dallas White Family Letters, personal collection of the author.

  12. Ibid.

  13. Ibid.

  14. Both “Nanking Incident” and “Nanking Outrage” are used to identify the outrageous events of March 1927.

  15. Stephen T. Hall, “Besieged: Missionary Soldiers for Christ Trapped in China’s Civil War,” Nampa, Idaho, Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2023, 158.

  16. ibid., 185-198. More details of Ira Wallace and Dallas White being “hunted like animals” and the cinematic reunion with their wives may be found in the book by Stephen T. Hall.

  17. Vera & Dallas R. White, to “Dear Folks at Home,” April 7, 1928, Dallas White Family Letters.

  18. C. B. Miller, “The Yunnan Mission,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1930, 2-3.

  19. C. C. Crisler, “Ordination Service,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1930, 2.

  20. C. B. Miller, “The Yunnan Mission,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1930, 2-3; Vera White to “Dear Ones at Home,” May 19, 1930, Dallas White Family Letters.

  21. Vera White to “Dear Folks at Home,” March 7, 1930, Dallas White Family Letters. Note: Since Dallas had just been recently ordained it seems likely that this was his first baptism and the same “one man baptized” he mentions in mid-July, 1930 “General Reports from the Field” (see note 22).

  22. Dallas R. White, “From Pastor Dallas R. White,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, September, 1930, 5.

  23. Vera N. (sic) White, “From Yunnanfu,” China Division Reporter, February 1931, 3.

  24. Vera White to “My Dear Ones at Home,” January 20, 1931, Dallas White Family Letters.

  25. Ibid.

  26. Dallas White to Vera White, February 1, 5 and 26, 1931, Dallas White Family Letters.

  27. Vera (Mosebar) White, 1931 Diary, February 1-March 15, 1931, personal collection of author; Harry E. Stevens, American Consulate, Yunnanfu, China to Nelson Trusler Johnson, American Minister, Peiping, April 3, 1931, “Chronology of events from December 2, 1930-March 26, 1931,” Enclosure 11, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland, Record Group 59 Entry A1 205C General Records of the Department of State, Central Decimal Files, 1930-1939, Box 1788, FE 393.1113 White.

  28. Dallas White to Father and Mother Mosebar, March 26, 1931, Dallas White Family Letters.

  29. Nelson Trusler Johnson, American Minister, Peiping to Secretary of State, Washington, January 16, 1932, enclosure of English translation of October 9, 1931 judgment, “Facts” 4, 5. National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland, Record Group 59 Entry A1 205C General Records of the Department of State, Central Decimal Files, 1930-1939, Box 1788, FE 393.1113 White. Note: Over the years there have been many variations of the story of this murder in newspapers, books, church periodicals and oral traditions. Information in this article is based on trials, appeals and verdicts as listed in file FE 393.1113. Even so, there are still unanswered questions.

  30. Ibid.

  31. Harry E. Stevens, American Consulate, Yunnanfu, China to Nelson Trusler Johnson, American Minister, Peiping, “Chronology of events from December 2, 1930-March 26, 1931,” Enclosure 11 NARA, FE 393.1113; Clarence C. Crisler, China’s Borderlands and Beyond, Takoma Park, Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1937.

  32. Dallas R. White to Mosebars, March 26, 1931, Dallas White Family Letters.

  33. Ibid.

  34. Ibid.

  35. Ibid.

  36. Merritt C. Warren and Clarence C. Crisler, “Our Fallen Co-workers,” Adventist Review and Herald, June 11, 1931, 21.

  37. L. E. Esteb, “Real Sacrifice,” North Pacific Union Gleaner, July 21, 1931, 2.

  38. Dallas White to Mom and Pop (Frank and Ella Mosebar), March 27, 1931, Dallas White Family Letters.

  39. National Archives and Records Administration; Washington, D.C.; “Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Seattle, Washington”; NAI Number: 4449160; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number; 85, Ancestry.com.

  40. Ella Mosebar to Dallas White, February 27, 1932, Dallas White Family Letters.

  41. U.S., Consular Reports of Marriages, 1910-1949, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; “Marriage Reports in State Department Decimal Files, 1910-1949”; Record Group: 59, General Records of the Department of State, 1763-2002; Series ARC ID: 2555709; Series MLR Number: A1, Entry 3001; Series Box Number: 534; File Number:133, Ancestry.com., accessed July 5, 2023.

  42. D. R. White, “In East Szechwan,” China Division Reporter, November, December 1932, 4.

  43. C. C. Crisler, “Into the West China Union,” China Division Reporter, Aug, Sep 1934, 3.

  44. “Departures,” China Division Reporter, July 20, 1934, 10.

  45. C. C. Crisler, “Transferred to Central China,” China Division Reporter, September, October 1935, 7.

  46. “Dallas R. White to A. W. Cormack, March 11, 1935, March 20, 1935,” General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file.

  47. Merrilyn (White) Webb, “Dallas Robert White Biography 1,” 2002, Dallas White Family Papers, personal collection of Karen Hill.

  48. Dallas White to Dearest Mother, (Charlotte Large) August 7-10, 1935, Dallas White Family Letters.

  49. “Hunan Mission,” China Division Reporter, June/July, 1937, 11.

  50. Ibid.

  51. Ibid.

  52. M. C. Warren, “Central China Union Report,” China Division Reporter, February 1938, 3-4.

  53. Ardyth (White) Hoffman, to Merrilyn (White) Webb, October 28, 2002, Dallas White Family Letters.

  54. Dallas White to A. W. Cormack, June 26, 1941, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file.

  55. Ardyth (White) Hoffman and Merrilyn (White) Webb, 2002, China Memories, personal collection of the author.

  56. Dallas White to Florence White, February 1938, Dallas White Family Letters.

  57. Dallas White to Florence White, March 20-April 30, 1938, Dallas White Family Letters.

  58. Dallas White to Florence White, April 30, 1939, Dallas White Family Letters.

  59. Dallas White to Florence White, November 4-January 14, 1939, Dallas White Family Letters.

  60. Dallas White to Florence White, January 6, 1939, Dallas White Family Letters.

  61. Dallas White to Florence White, November 4, 1938, Dallas White Family Letters.

  62. Dallas White to Florence White, January 14, 1939, Dallas White Family Letters.

  63. Dallas R. White, 1939 Day Journal, (beginning with March 25), Pacific Press Publishing Association.

  64. G. J. Appel, “Hunan Annual Meeting,” China Division Reporter, April 1, 1940.

  65. S. L. Frost, “Information on Returning Missionaries,” November 19, 1940, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file.

  66. Dallas R. White to A. W. Cormack, June 26, 1941, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file.

  67. S. L. Frost, “Information on Returning Missionaries,” November 19, 1940, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file; Merrilyn (White) Webb, “China Memories,” November 5, 2002, personal collection of Karen Hill.

  68. “Dallas R. White Letter to A. W. Cormack, June 26, 1941,” General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file.

  69. See General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file, letters 1941-1942.

  70. Dallas R. White to A. W. Cormack, June 26, 1941, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file.

  71. General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Archives, Secretariat Appointee Files, RG 21 Box 9922, Dallas R. White Appointee file, letters 1941-1942.

  72. Dallas R. White, “Personal Chronology,” Dallas White Family Papers, personal collection of the author.

  73. Ibid.

  74. Ibid.

  75. Merrilyn (White) Webb, “Dallas White Biography 1,” China Memories, personal collection of Karen Hill.

  76. Dallas R. White, “Personal Chronology,” Dallas White Family Papers.

  77. “Former Worker Dies on Mission.” October 9, 1964, Loma Linda University Scope, 1. Accessed July 7, 2023, https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1072&context=scope.

  78. Ibid.

  79. Dallas Robert White, Findagrave.com, accessed July 10, 2023, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/63152876/dallas-robert-white.

  80. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1950.

  81. Florence White, “Teaching Certificate,” 1964, personal collection of Karen Hill.

  82. “Fifty Future Teachers Receive Credentials,” Pacific Union Recorder, May 9, 1966; Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1964-1971.

  83. “Deaths,” White, Florence Numbers, ARH, July 17, 1986.

  84. Ibid.; Florence Grace (Numbers) White, Findagrave.com, accessed July 6, 2023, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/175354586/florence-grace-white.

×

Patt, Susan D., Milton Hook. "White, Dallas Robert (1900–1964) and Vera Ann (Mosebar) (1901–1931); later, Florence Grace (Numbers) (1904–1986)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 08, 2024. Accessed May 23, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A8QC.

Patt, Susan D., Milton Hook. "White, Dallas Robert (1900–1964) and Vera Ann (Mosebar) (1901–1931); later, Florence Grace (Numbers) (1904–1986)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 08, 2024. Date of access May 23, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A8QC.

Patt, Susan D., Milton Hook (2024, January 08). White, Dallas Robert (1900–1964) and Vera Ann (Mosebar) (1901–1931); later, Florence Grace (Numbers) (1904–1986). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 23, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A8QC.