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Facade of the South Parana Conference building, 2016.

Photo courtesy of South Parana Conference Archive, accessed on October 1, 2019, http://bit.ly/2p5ZSp7.

South Parana Conference

By Renato Gross, and Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira

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Renato Gross

Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira

South Parana Conference (ASP) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of South Brazil Union Conference (USB). Its headquarters is currently at Senador Salgado Filho Av., nº 5280, Uberaba district, zip code 81580-000, in the city of Curitiba, capital of the state of Parana, Brazil.1

ASP covers part of the metropolitan area of Curitiba and all south regions of Paraná. There are 39 cities in its territory, all with an Adventist presence, which adds to around 2,268,787 inhabitants. Furthermore, there are 36 pastoral districts and 221 hosted congregations, with 21,480 baptized members. The regional average is one Adventist for each 105 inhabitants.2 In the education area, the ASP has eight education institutions in its territory.

In Curitiba, there is Alto Boqueirão Adventist Academy, with 1,079 students; Bom Retiro Adventist Academy, with 1,172 students; and Centenary Adventist Academy, with 1,174 students. In Paranaguá, there is Paranaguá Adventist Academy, with 656 students; and in Guaraqueçaba, there is Guaraqueçaba Adventist School, with 96 students. In União da Vitória, there is União da Vitória Adventist School, with 242 students; in Pinhais, there is Pinhais Adventist School, with 451 students; and in São José dos Pinhais, there is São José dos Pinhais Adventist Academy, with 1,831 students.3

In order to meet the region’s demands, ASP employs a work force of 716 servers; 46 of these are ordained ministers, and 12 are licensed ministers.4

Origin of SDA Work in the Conference Territory

In 1896, Adventism arrived in Paraná, more precisely in Curitiba, through canvassing. On the 13th of January that year, Albert Stauffer sold the German version of the book Story of Jesus, by Ellen White, to Mrs. Ana Otto. After being invited to stay in the Otto’s family residence, the evangelist canvasser5 continued preaching. In the beginning of the following week, after finishing a Bible study on the change of Saturday to Sunday, Ana accepted the Adventist faith along with her husband, Oscar Otto. By dawn that day, the state of Parana had its first Adventist converts.6

Ana and Otto were good missionaries from the beginning of their conversion. On the first Sabbath after they accepted Adventism, they conducted the first Paraná Sabbath School in their own house. They invited their friends to the gathering, and among them, there was Stauffer. The unfolding of that and other gatherings were significant, because they were the first Adventist group in the state. Other families worth mentioning are Frederico and Marthe Benckendorf, Jorge and Marria Wischral, and Otto and Albertina Seeling.7

Still in the first semester of 1896, Pastor Huldreich Ferdinand Graf arrived in Curitiba. Due to the significant number of children interested and the potentials glimpsed in the late nineteenth century, Graf opened an academy in Curitiba. Consequently, on July 1, 1896, the first Adventist Brazilian institution of education began to operate, situated at Paula Gomes St., nº 290 by the name of International Academy. That year, the school finished its activities with a total of 44 enrolled students. Today, under the name of Bom Retiro Adventist Academy of Curitiba, the centenary institution has more than a thousand students.

The first student to enroll in the International Academy was a girl named Marta, from the Seeling family. The first teachers were Guilherme Stein Jr. and his young wife, Maria. The venue was a very simple house, which functioned as a school, a worship house, and a home for both families - Stein and Graf. A year later, in September 1897, the Stein couple was transferred to Gaspar Alto in Santa Catarina.8 Brother Paulo Kramer, from the city of Hamburg, Germany was called to replace them. At the end of the first semester of 1897, the enrollment numbers went up to 70 students, a number that increased with time.9

In those early days, the Adventist message spread in Curitiba through publishing and educational work. In a single year, in January 1897,10 Pastor Graf organized the first group of people bound to Adventism. The growth of this first church, known today as the Seventh-day Adventist Central Curitiba Church, was extraordinary. In 1906, they received the family of Augusto and Ida Aniess, who came from Joinville, in the countryside of the state of Santa Catarina. Shortly after, when the International Academy closed, in 1904, the church started gathering in rented places, such as in the streets of Pedro Ivo and Aquidaban, now known as Emiliano Perneta,11

Conference Organizational History

In 1906, the territory of Brazil Conference, which covered the entire national territory, was reorganized into four missionary fields. Within the new administrative units that emerged was Santa Catarina-Parana Conference, with its headquarters in the city of Brusque, Santa Catarina. Later, in December 1910, at a meeting in the city of Porto Alegre, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Parana Conference was created, with its headquarters in Curitiba.12 Thereafter, the new institution was responsible for fostering the progress of the Adventist work in the whole region of Paraná - a territory that relied on 135 baptized members and only four organized churches. The first appointed leaders to head the institution were Pastors Jacob G. Kroeker, as president, and Augusto Pages, as secretary and treasurer, thus constituting the initial milestone of the conference.13

In the beginning of the 1910s, certain Adventist families emigrated from Germany to Curitiba. Among these families were the relatives of Guilherme and Sofia Malsbenden, Otto and Maria Weber, and Pastor Luis Braun, as well as the young Felix Zetztsche. A few years later, on January 20, 1915, with the help of Malsbendenm, designer and constructor, the first Adventist church in Paraná was built at Saldanha Marinho St., nº 1,110, at the corner of Brigadeiro Franco St.14 The work continued growing throughout the state of Paraná - many baptisms occurred periodically in the Barigui River, where the current Barigui Park is, near the Ukrainian Memorial.15 In 1915, at least 88 people in the territory were baptized. At the end of the year, the number of Adventists in the region reached 190 people, who congregated in the five organized churches in the state.16

Furthermore, “in 1917, Pastor Ricardo Süssmann conducted a series of public conferences, where many families were converted.”17 There is news of other conferences in tents that were set where the Chancellor’s Building is today at Paraná Federal University, at the corner of 7 de Setembro and Buenos Aires Streets.18 These conferences relied on choir participation, because there was a special concern for the quality of music. On those occasions, piano music during the service was not usual because the sound of the organ or pump organ predominated,19 which was considered to be the most solemn sound. Piano music was limited to Sabbath School.20

At the same time, the Sabbath and Advent messages reached other cities, such as União Vitória, Alexandra, Ponta Grossa, Castro (where Pastor Spies21 resided for a while), and Teixeira Soares. There the brethren built churches and church schools in order to care for the new Adventist generations. In addition, new churches were opened in Curitiba, in Vista Alegre, Juvevê, and Portão neighborhoods, all with attached schools.22 Later on, in 1921, a youth society called Volunteer Missionaries (VM) was organized, with Emílio Doehnert as the first director. Later, Doehnert became a canvassing leader in USB and, finally, general manager of Brazil Publishing House (BPH) in the city of Santo André, state of São Paulo. Meanwhile, in the Curitiba Church, the VM society was led by the worker Roberto Rabello who, years later, would become the speaker of the program Voice of Prophecy.23

In 1927, the SDA Church promoted a reunification of its administrative units located in the states of Santa Catarina and Paraná. Consequently, the headquarters of the Seventh-day Adventists of Santa Catarina-Paraná Mission was centralized in Curitiba, occupying the rooms on the ground floor of the central church. This decision was taken on March 8 by the Administrative Board of USB, which was attended by Pastor G. W. Schubert, representative of the General Conference, and Pastor Nielsen, representative of the union in question. One reason for the change of address to Curitiba was the difficult access to Brusque and Gaspar Alto.24

The first board to lead the mission during this new phase was composed of Pastors Germano Strithorst, as president, and Germano Guilherme Ritter, as secretary-treasurer. In 1927, the field had 803 members. Also, in 1927, there were 147 baptisms. The pastoral districts were established in Curitiba, with nine churches and groups, under the orientation of Pastor A. E. Hagen; Ponta Grossa, with nine churches and groups, under the leadership of A L Westphal; Itararé with 15 districts and groups, under the direction of Alfredo Suessmann; Florianópolis, under the leadership of pastor Germano Streithorst; Brusque, under the coordination of Pastor Kaltehauser; and Mafra and Rio Negro, without a leading pastor. The field dynamics was notorious from an early stage, as in its first year six conference series were planned, and 35 evangelistic campaigns were carried out.25

Concerning teaching, Adventist education remained strong in the territory. In 1929, the field had eight schools, operating in the cities of: Curitiba, Alexandra, Piraí do Sul, Cornélio Procópio, Teixeira Soares, Tronco, Butiá, and Castro. Some faculty members that worked in these schools were Eurico Avi, Eliza Crivelaro, Marta Franz, Manoel Kümpel, Conrado Stoehr, Herbert Hoffmann, Durval Stockler de Lima, Dalva Paula, Ludgero Reinert, João Bork, Werner Frank, Waldemar Ehlers, Pedro C. Braga, Werner Weber, and Odete Oberg. As church pastors in these cities the following were appointed; F. K. Kumpel, Matias Alencar, Emílio Keppke, Roberto Rabelo, J. D. Hardt, Querino Dau, G. F. Ebinger, Emílio R. Azevedo, G. H. Gerling, J. M. Zeroth, Nelson Schwantes, Arnoldo Rutz, Santiago Schmidt, João Kattwinkel, Dermeval Stockler, Boni Renk, and Silas Gianini.26

Moreover, the Seventh-day Adventist Mission of Santa Catarina-Paraná organized a choir, initially conducted by Guilherme Ebinger - the institution treasurer at the time. Sometime later, Evaldo Schünermann, Bernardo Schünermann's brother, former manager of BPH, took over the position of choirmaster.27 Thus music was added to the pioneering work of evangelism, education, and publishing, which helped the Adventist mission continue progressing in the whole region of Paraná. The growth was so abundant that, in 1933, Santa Catarina-Parana Mission had 1,635 members who met in at least 17 organized churches throughout the mission territory.28 Therefore, the importance of music ministry for the expansion of Adventism in the region currently covered by ASP is notable, as well as the relevance of canvassing, Adventist education, and public conferences.29

Later in 1934 the Adventist work in Paraná experienced greater development than in Santa Catarina, causing the Santa Catarina-Parana Mission to become the Parana-Santa Catarina Mission.30 In addition, the institution had 1,906 members that were spread throughout 16 churches. In 1934, 162 people were baptized throughout the territory attended by the mission.31 In the same period, the institution was moved from Saldanha Marinho St., in Curitiba, to Dr. Ermelino Leão St., also in Curitiba.32 However, in 1940, the mission changed its name to Parana-Santa Catarina Conference, a nomenclature used until 1956, when the Adventist work was reorganized in both states. At that time, churches in Paraná came to be led by Parana Conference, which later gave rise to ASP. In the 1980s, about 2,513 people were baptized, which increased the number of Adventists in the region to 32,563.33

Until 1988, Adventist work was coordinated by Paraná Conference in the state of Paraná. However, in that same year, the territory was reorganized once again. Through vote no. 88-353, the assembly of the South American Division approved the establishment of two SDA Conferences in Paraná. Thereafter, North Parana Conference (ANP), established its headquarters in the city of Maringá, countryside of Paraná. The former Parana Conference became known as South Parana Conference (ASP). Therefore, ASP is the oldest IASD administrative organization in Paraná. For more than a century, the message that inspired the prophetically foretold Adventist pioneers has been sown, cultivated, grown, and rooted in this state.34

A new geographic reorganization of ASP took place in January 2010, when Central Parana Conference (ACP) was created. The new institution was responsible for fostering the progress of the work in the whole central region of Parana, which had 21,551 members.35 ASP continued assisting the 18,841 members of the southern region of the state.36 Between 2010 and 2013 more than 7,200 people were baptized in ASP territory alone. Furthermore, 51 new districts were established, around 1.7 million missionary books were handed out, and 51 new churches were built - 12 in cities that had no previous Adventist presence.37 Then, between 2000 and 2016, 84 new churches were built - an average of one church every 2.5 months. Within this context, the Afonso Pena Church38 was established and a new Central Curitiba Church (with capacity for 2,200 people) was built.

But in 2013, ASP went through another reorganization. In that year the West Parana Mission, the current West Parana Conference, was created. The new administrative headquarters was responsible for the continuity of Adventist work in the whole region of western Parana.39 With that reconfiguration, ASP was responsible for 102 churches, with 18,434 baptized members in the whole southern region of the Parana state.40 Concerning the evangelistic movements of the ASP, between 2011 and 2016, through the Impacto Esperança [Hope Impact] project,41 around 2.2 million missionary books were handed out. At the same time, new buildings were opened in the Academies of Paranaguá, São José dos Pinhais, and Pinhais. Furthermore, the Hope Channel stands out in the region as a tool of evangelism, being conveyed by 14 channels, with a range of 19 cities and nearly 2,689,396 viewers.42

Throughout its history, ASP received the following names: Parana Conference, from 1910 to 1927; Santa Catarina-Parana Mission, from 1927 to 1934; Parana-Santa Catarina Mission, from 1935 to 1940; Parana-Santa Catarina Conference, from 1940 to 1956; Parana Conference, from 1957 to 1988; South Parana Conference from 1989. Moreover, the institution went through changes in its operation addresses (all in the city of Curitiba). From 1927 to 1934, the conference office was at Saldanha Marinho St., nº 169; from 1935 to 1958, Ermelino de Leão St., nº 170; from 1958 to 1959, Saldanha Marinho St., nº 1147; from 1959 to 2000, Brigadeiro Franco St., nº 1275; from 2001 to 2010, Deputado João Ferreira Neves St., nº 159; from 2011, Senador Salgado Filho Av., nº 5280.43

Among the acquired learning throughout ASP’s journey, one is worthy of mention, regarding 2010, when the conference was reorganized. On that occasion, the educational area of the institution went through many challenges because some Adventist schools became deficient, with low rates of enrollment, hindering the growth of the segment. However, after some important administrative decisions, the department grew more than 50 percent regarding the number of enrolled students between 2010 and 2019, and today the institutions are well-developed financially, which has allowed the building of three new school units from 2017 to 2019. In addition to the financial growth and the growing number of students, the sense of mission of the schools has also intensified. Each year hundreds of people are baptized as the direct fruit of Adventist education.

ASP also faced challenges related to the attempt of establishing an Adventist presence in the 39 cities that compose the territory. Nevertheless, with much evangelistic effort and a strategic plan of church planting, evangelism, and discipleship, the institution has been obtaining good results in this area, even though some places still need to be won and consolidated in the near future. Before new obstacles, financial resources have been invested for the expansion of churches and to win new cities. The keyword is “growth.” For that reason, the members are driven and trained to develop in discipleship, with the precious aid of the Bible and the Sabbath School to study, teach, and practice. The intentional objective is to develop disciples who take part in the evangelism of the territory and offer tithes and offerings to maintain its work.

In the educational area, plans involve the completion of some buildings, as well as an increase in enrollment, investments in pedagogical training, and school evangelism. Finally, in relation to the area of publications, the plan is to recruit and train new canvassers, as well as to advance student canvassing.

Chronology of Administrative Executives44

Presidents: Jacob G. Kroger (1910-1912); Augusto Pages (1913); Ricardo Suesmann (1914-1916); Germano Conrado (1917-1918); Saturnino Mendes de Oliveira (1919); Germano Streithorst (1920-1923); Niels P. Nielsen (1924); Ennis V. Moore (1925-1926); Germano Streithorst (1927-1931); H. G. Stoher (1932-1934); A. L. Westphal (1935-1936); Elmer Wilcox (1937); Germano Ritter (1938-1940); Querino Dau (1941-1943); Orlando G. Pinho (1944); José Rodrigues dos Passos (1945-1949); Moisés S. Nigri (1950-1951); Orlando G. Pinho (1952-1953); José Nunes Siqueira (1954-1957); Arnoldo Rutz (1958-1963); Itanel Ferraz (1964-1966); João Wolff (1967-1968); Floriano Xavier dos Santos (1969-1971); Walter Boger (1972-1977); Henrique Berg (1977); David Moroz (1978-1985); Luís Lindolfo Fuckner (1986-1993); Samuel G. F. Zukowski (1994-1998); Antônio Alberto G. Moreira (1999-2009); Luis Mário de Souza Pinto (2010-2011); Herbert Boger Junior (2011-2013); Williams Moreira César (2013-current).

Secretaries: Augusto Pages (1911); Nola Stauffer (1912); Augusto Pages (1913); Saturnino Mendes de Oliveira (1919-1925); Germano Ritter (1926-1928); Guilherme Doerner (1929-1931); Guilherme Ebinger (1932-1934); G. G. Ritter (1935); F. H. Gerling (1936-1939); Dermival Stockler Lima (1940-1941); Wilson Ávila (1942); O. G. de Pinho (1943-1945); Dermival Stockler Lima (1946-1952); R. S. Ferreira (1953-1956); Hugo Gegembauer (1956-1962); N. S. Ávila (1963-1965); Francisco Nascimento (1966-1967); Walter Boger (1968-1971); Adolpho dos Santos (1972-1974); Leonid Bogdanow (1975-1979); Harry E. Bergold (1980-1988); Albino Marks (1989-1994); Otávio A. Fonseca (1995-2004); Giovan Monteiro (2005-2008); Stanley Edilson Arco (2009); Herbert Boger Junior (2010); Osni Fernandes (2011-2016); Edilson Cardoso (2017-current).

Treasurers: Augusto Pages (1911); Nola Stauffer (1912); Augusto Pages (1913); Germano Ritter (1926-1928); Guilherme Doerner (1929-1931); Guilherme Ebinger (1932-1934); G. G. Ritter (1935); F. H. Gerling (1936-1941); Wilson Ávila (1942); O. G. de Pinho (1943-1945); Dermival Stockler Lima (1946-1952); R. S. Ferreira (1953-1956); Hugo Gegembauer (1956-1962); N. S. Ávila (1963-1965); Francisco Nascimento (1966-1967); Walter Boger (1968-1971); Adolpho dos Santos (1972-1977); Vilson P. Keller (1978-1982); Paulo C. dos Reis (1983-1988); Ivalter de Souza (1989-1997); Antônio Oliveira Tostes (1998-2001); Edson Erthal de Medeiros (2002-2007); Uilson Leandro Garcia (2008); Laudecir Miotto Mazzo (2009); João Adilson Rodrigues (2010-2018); Leonardo Pombo (2019-current).45

Sources

“Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1987.

Bergold, H. E. “Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1987, 24.

Canedo, R. G. Uma semente de esperança: história da estrutura denominacional [A seed of hope: history of the denominational structure]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015.

Enciclopédia da Memória Adventista no Brasil Website [Encyclopaedia of the Adventist Memory in Brazil Website]. http://bit.ly/2EUazjs.

Gross, Renato. Curitiba Secondary International Academy: a story of faith and pioneering. Rio de Janeiro, RJ: Collins, 1996.

Gross, Renato. Instituto Adventista Paranaense: uma história em três tempos – 1939-2009 [Parana Adventist Academy: a story in three steps – 1939-2009]. Ivatuba, PR: Parana Adventist Academy, 2009.

“Paraná é dividido em dois campos” [Parana is divided in two fields]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1988.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Portal. https://www.adventistas.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopaedia. First revised edition. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1976.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

South Parana Conference Website. asp.org.br.

Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions. Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911, 1916, and 1935.

Zukowski, Samuel. “Santa Catarina: berço da mensagem adventista no Brasil” [Santa Catarina: birthplace of the Adventist message in Brazil], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1994.

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “South Parana Conference,” accessed on August 12, 2019, http://bit.ly/2Tr3BbA.

  2. Jéssica Brites, email message to Luvercy Ferreira, September 25, 2018.

  3. Idem.

  4. Idem.

  5. An evangelist canvasser is a missionary who “builds ministry by acquiring and selling to the publications published and approved by the Church, with the objective of conveying to its fellows the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Accessed on August 30, 2018, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  6. Renato Gross, Curitiba Secondary International Academy: a story of faith and pioneering (Rio de Janeiro, RJ: Collins, 1996), 45-51.

  7. Roberto Doehnert and E. A. Doehnert, The message of the advent arrives in Curitiba, PR (Non-published Historical Memory, original copy of this author’s archives), 4.

  8. Renato Gross, Curitiba Secondary International Academy: a story of faith and pioneering (Rio de Janeiro, RJ: Collins, 1996), 31.

  9. Edgar Link, email message to the author, November 9, 2016.

  10. Idem.

  11. Roberto Doehnert and E. A. Doehnert, The message of the advent arrives in Curitiba, PR (Non-published Historical Memory, original copy of this author’s archives), 6, 8.

  12. “Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 126.

  13. “Brazilian Union Conf.,” Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1911), 8; “Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1912), 139.

  14. Roberto Doehnert and E. A. Doehnert, The message of the advent arrives in Curitiba, PR (Non-published Historical Memory, original copy of this author’s archives), 6, 8.

  15. Ibid., 10.

  16. “Brazilian Union Conf.,” Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1916), 6.

  17. Ibid.

  18. H. E. Bergold, “Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1987, 24.

  19. “Musical instrument of keyboards and bellows that replaces the organ, in which the tubes are replaced by free or electric reeds.” Michaelis, “Pump organ,” accessed on January 17, 2019, http://twixar.me/4DY3.

  20. Renato Gross, Instituto Adventista Paranaense: uma história em três tempos – 1939-2009 [Parana Adventist Academy: a story in three steps – 1939-2009] (Ivatuba, PR: Parana Adventist Academy, 2009), 54.

  21. Frederico Weber Spies (1866-1935) was a missionary, pastor, and administrator of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. “Converter to Adventism at 22.” In 1896 he came to work in Brazil at the request of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Spies and his wife Isadora Read were pioneers among other missionaries who came to Brazil to preach the Adventist message. Enciclopédia da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Encyclopaedia of the Adventist Memory in Brazil], “Spies, Frederico Weber (1866-1935),” accessed on January 24, 2019, http://twixar.me/pGY3.

  22. H. E. Bergold, “Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1987, 24; “Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1987, 40.

  23. Radio and television programs were launched in Brazil around 1963 with the objective of spreading the Adventist message. Jacinto Col Neto, “Voice of Prophecy in Brazil” (Monography, Brazil College, no date), 1.

  24. Samuel Zukowski, “Santa Catarina: berço da mensagem adventista no Brasil” [Santa Catarina: birthplace of the Adventist message in Brazil], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1994, 8-11; R. G. Canedo, Uma Semente de Esperança: a história da estrutura denominacional [A Seed of Hope: the story of the denominational structure] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015); “Brazil,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia – Revised Edition 10 (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1976), 187-188; “Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 126.

  25. H. E. Bergold, “Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1987, 24; “Associação Paranaense Comemora 60º Aniversário” [Parana Conference Celebrates its 60th Anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1987, 40.

  26. Idem.

  27. Roberto Doehnert and E. A. Doehnert, The message of the advent arrives in Curitiba, PR (Non-published Historical Memory, original copy of this author’s archives), 10.

  28. “Santa Catharina-Parana Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1934), 173.

  29. Roberto Doehnert and E. A. Doehnert, The message of the advent arrives in Curitiba, PR (Non-published Historical Memory, original copy of this author’s archives), 8.

  30. Ibid.

  31. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Statistical Report of Seventh-day Adventist Conferences, Missions and Institutions (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1935), 14.

  32. “Santa Catharina-Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1934), 173; “Parana-Santa Catarina Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1935), 176.

  33. Ibid.

  34. “Paraná é dividido em dois campos” [Parana is divided in two fields]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1988, 22.

  35. “Central Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 302.

  36. “South Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 306.

  37. “Presidência, 7ª. Assembleia Quadrienal – Associação Sul Paranaense” [Presidency, 7th Quadrennial Assembly - South Parana Conference], 2013, 7-8.

  38. Jéssica Guidolin, email message to the authors, January 17, 2017.

  39. “West Parana Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2014), 294.

  40. “South Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2014), 293.

  41. “Hope Impact is a program that motivates reading and provides the annual mass distribution of books on the Seventh-day Adventists part in the whole South American territory.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, https://bit.ly/2WZNdzY.

  42. Jéssica Guidolin, email message to the authors, January 17, 2017.

  43. Marlene Freitas, email message to the authors, August 16, 2010.

  44. “Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 126; “South Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 255; South Parana Conference, “Líderes Administrativos” [Administrative Leaders] accessed on August 12, 2019, http://bit.ly/31BAOUN. For a more detailed verification about all presidents, secretaries, and treasurers of the South Parana Conference, consult the Seventh-day Adventist yearbooks from 1911 to 2018.

  45. More info about the South Parana Conference can be checked on the website: asp.org.br, or in social media – Facebook, Instagram e Twitter: @adventistasasp, and Youtube: Associação Sul Paranaense [South Parana Conference].

×

Gross, Renato, Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira. "South Parana Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7I48.

Gross, Renato, Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira. "South Parana Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Date of access March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7I48.

Gross, Renato, Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira (2021, January 10). South Parana Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7I48.