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Aerial view of the North Brazil Union Mission headquarters in 2018

Photo courtesy of North Brazil Union Mission Archives, accessed on July 27, 2020, https://bit.ly/3g58yl4.

North Brazil Union Mission

By Daniel Oscar Plenc, and Josafá da Silva Oliveira

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Daniel Oscar Plenc, Th.D. (River Plate Adventist University, Entre Ríos, Argentina), currently works as a theology professor and director of the White Research Center at the River Plate Adventist University. He worked as a district pastor for twelve years. He is married to Lissie Ziegler and has three children.

Josafá da Silva Oliveira

First Published: July 30, 2021

The North Brazil Union Mission (União Norte Brasileira, or UNB) is an administrative unit of the South American Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It is headquartered at 400 Mário Covas highway, Zip Code 67113-330, Coqueiro neighborhood, city of Ananindeua, state of Pará, Brazil.

Territory and Statistics

The North Brazil Union Mission comprises the states of Pará and Amapá in the northern region of Brazil, and the state of Maranhão in the northeast region. The total area is quite extensive, with approximately 1,722,798 square kilometers, highlighting the fact that Pará is the second largest state in Brazil. The total population of this territory is approximately 16,523,777. Those three states are in the area covered by the Brazilian Amazon which exits into the Atlantic Ocean. The Adventist Church is represented in the region by 318,770 members, distributed in 3,243 congregations. The ratio is one Adventist per 56 inhabitants.1

UNB leads a total of seven administrative units in the three states. In Pará, the following institutions operate: North Para Conference (Associação Norte do Pará, or ANPa), organized in 1927, headquartered in the city of Marituba; South Pará Conference (Associação Sul do Pará, or ASPa), organized in 2001, located in the city of Marabá; West Pará Mission (Missão Oeste do Pará, or MOPa), organized in 2008, with headquarters in the city of Santarém; Pará-Amapá Mission (Missão Pará-Amapá, or MPA), organized in 2016, located in the city of Ananindeua. This last administrative unit also serves Adventists in the state of Amapá. In Maranhão, the following institutions operate: Maranhao Conference (Associação Maranhense, or AMa), organized in 1988, headquartered in the city of São Luís (state capital); South Maranhao Conference (Missão Sul Maranhense, or MSMa), organized in 2006, with headquarters in the city of Imperatriz; and Northeast Maranhão Mission (Missão Nordeste Maranhense, or MNeM), established in 2019, headquartered in the city of Paço do Lumiar.2

The Adventist Educational Network is present in this territory through 34 schools, which together serve 17,186 students, through 969 teachers and other employees. This network includes a boarding school, Amazonia Adventist College (Faculdade Adventista da Amazônia, or FAAMA), located on Augusto Meira Filho highway, km 1, in the city of Benevides, in Pará. The UNB also manages Belem Adventist Hospital (Hospital Adventista de Belém, or HAB), located at 1758 Almirante Barroso Avenue, Marco neighborhood, in Belém. Furthermore, the UNB has operated New Time Radio (Rádio Novo Tempo) since 1995, and Hope Channel Brazil (TV Novo Tempo) on channel 44, since 2014. Both are broadcast from Belém, with a potential reach of approximately 1.5 million people.3

In the UNB territory there is Brazil Publishing House (Casa Publicadora Brasileira, or CPB) bookstore, located at 3588 Barão do Triunfo Street, Marco neighborhood, in Belém. The Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA) office also operates in the region. In the state of Pará, this agency maintains five development centers, where professional courses, sports, and music courses are offered through partnerships with the public and private sectors. These centers operate in Belém, Marituba, Jacundá, Castanhal, and Cametá.4

To serve Adventists throughout its territory, UNB has 3,735 employees, 63 of whom work in the union office in various departments. Among this total of 3,735 employees, there are 249 credentialed workers, and 136 licensed workers, with 18 credentialed and nine licensed workers at the UNB administrative headquarters.5

The Mission Organizational History

UNB’s history can be seen in five stages. The first stage was the time before the establishment of the union. It began in the early days of Adventism in Brazil and extended until the 1920s, when efforts were made to organize denominational expansion. The second stage began with the creation of Lower Amazonas Mission (Missão Baixo Amazonas, or MBA), now called North Para Conference (Associação Norte do Pará, or ANPa), and the inauguration of medical missionary launches between 1927 and 1936. The third stage covered a long period of time and corresponded to the organization and development of the UNB between 1936 and 1996. The fourth stage is marked by the first territorial reorganization of the institution, which led to the creation of Northeast Brazil Union Mission (União Nordeste Brasileira, or UNeB), between 1996 and 2009. Finally, the fifth stage came after another territorial reorganization and covered the period beginning in 2010, with the creation of Northwest Brazil Union Mission (União Noroeste Brasileira, or UNoB), and it lasts until the present day.6

The organization of an administrative unit in the northern region of Brazil took place 30 years after the establishment of the first Adventist congregation in the southern region of the country in the city of Gaspar Alto, state of Santa Catarina, in 1895. Nonetheless, since the origin of Adventist work in Brazil, denominational advances were directed to the northern region. The first conferences and unions were established in the early 20th century, in Brazil. In 1902, Brazil Conference (Associação Brasileira), now known as Rio de Janeiro Conference (Associação Rio de Janeiro), was created and was responsible for the entire national territory. Later this conference was reorganized and its territory was reconfigured into four organizations. The first union, Brazilian Union Conference (União Brasileira), now known as Central Brazil Union Conference (União Central Brasileira, or UCB), was established in 1911.7 Due to its vast expanse, a few years later the territory was reorganized again. Brazilian Union Conference became South Brazil Union Conference (União Sul Brasileira), now known as Central Brazil Union Conference, and North Brazil Union Mission (União Norte Brasileira) was created. Soon after it became East Brazil Union Conference (União Este Brasileira, or UEB), now known as Southeast Brazil Union Conference (União Sudeste Brasileira, or USeB).8 With these changes, more attention was paid to the northern region.

In 1920, Pastors Oliver Montgomery and W. H. Williams, SAD president and treasurer, respectively, made an exploratory trip to the Amazon region, following the course of the Amazon River from Peru down to Manaus and Belém. After that trip, plans were developed to create an Adventist mission in the northern region. However, these plans were postponed due to lack of human resources.9 In 1920 there were only three Adventist members in Maranhão and there were few reports of canvassers working in the region.10 In a bold initiative on January 14, 1927, UEB voted the organization and establishment of the Lower Amazonas Mission, or MBA, presently known as ANPa and headquartered in Belém.11

At the time of its foundation, MBA covered the territory of the present Brazilian states of Amazonas, Acre, Rondônia, Roraima, Pará, Amapá, Maranhão, Piauí, and Ceará, an area of 4,273,689 square kilometers.12 The mission was definitively organized with the arrival of Pastor John L. Brown, his wife Esther, and their son, Walton. As soon as Brown arrived, he assumed the presidency of the field. With the Brown family, there were also the canvassers André Gedrath and Hans Mayr, the latter with his wife, Johanna. The group left the city of Rio de Janeiro on May 18, 1927, and arrived in Belém on May 29.13 During the next two years, the workers who served in the northern region were under the direction of MBA. As a result of this effort, the first Adventist church in the region was organized in the city of São Luís, Maranhão.14 At the same time, a church and school were organized at Centenary Farm in the city of Maués, in Amazonas. Three more schools were founded in Andirá, Ponta Alegre, and Mucajá.15

At the beginning of this missionary work, people traveled by land and by water. The canvassers distributed materials in capitals such as Belém, São Luís, and Fortaleza, and they navigated rivers with missionary launches.16 Pastor John Brown had sunstroke and was stricken by malaria, so he was forced to leave MBA in June 1928. The field was left without official leadership until the election of Pastor Leo Halliwell, six months later. Halliwell arrived in Belém in 1929.17 After his arrival, the Luzeiro (Light Bearer) launches were inaugurated. These boats carried people who took the message of the gospel and healthful living to villages and cities on the banks of the Amazon River between Manaus and Belém. The first Light Bearer launch was inaugurated on July 4, 1931, with the aim of serving communities located along the 64,000 square kilometers of navigable rivers.18

With the missionary work of the pioneers and the assistance of those working on the Light Bearer launch, there was an increase in the number of Adventists in northern Brazil. Soon the leaders of UEB and SAD realized that there were great possibilities for evangelism in that region. During the division’s Annual Council, held at Brazil College (Colégio Adventista Brasileiro, or CAB), now known as Brazil Adventist University, Sao Paulo campus (Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo), in the city of São Paulo, the committee members voted to organize a new union to serve the work in that part of the country.19 The name of this new administrative unit would be North Brazil Union Mission (União Norte Brasileira, or UNB). The vote for its organization (#336-4682) was taken by SAD on December 8, 1936, and was voted on December 16, 1936, during the council at CAB.20 With the organization of the institution, the third stage of UNB’s history began.21

UNB was founded with the aim of more effectively serving Adventists spread throughout the northern and part of northeastern Brazil. Its mission was to reach the entire local population with the three angels’ messages. Leo Halliwell was elected as the first president of this institution, in addition to his presidency of MBA. In the territory served by UNB there was only one church and 253 members, among approximately six million inhabitants.22 During its first years of operation, UNB was headquartered at 187 Piedade Street, in Belém.23 The union managed two fields: MBA, which served the Church in the states of Pará, Amazonas, and Acre; and North Coast Mission (Missão Costa Norte, or MCN), now known as Ceara Conference (Associação Cearense, or ACe), headquartered in Fortaleza, which included the states of Ceará, Maranhão, and Piauí.24 In 1940 another institution was established in UNB territory: Central Amazon Mission (Missão Central Amazonas, or MCA), now known as Central Amazon Conference (Associação Central Amazonas, or ACeAm), with headquarters in Manaus, capital of Amazonas.25

In 1941, Light Bearer I, the first missionary launch built, started to serve MCA territory. During the following years additional launches were inaugurated, such as Light Bearer II, commanded by Halliwell, which served MBA territory. Later, Light Bearer III sailed along the Parnaíba River in the state of Piauí.26 This decade also saw the strengthening of urban evangelization, for which Gustavo Storch, an Adventist pioneer in the north and northeast, was one of those responsible.27 In addition to Storch’s efforts, Walter and Olga Streithorst carried on the launch ministry. Walter Streithorst built Light Bearer IV, V, and VI, and two smaller boats for the canvassing work. At that time, UNB received a large group of missionaries from the United States, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and other places.28

Adventist pioneer leaders also dreamed of establishing health organizations in northern Brazil. In a dialogue between Leo and Jessie Halliwell, later reproduced and documented by Olga in his book Leo Halliwell na Amazônia (Leo Halliwell in the Amazon), the following report is found: “So far we are working in this city with only the left arm; from now on, we will also work with the right arm.” Jessie did not understand what her husband had said and asked for an explanation. He replied: “Now, you well know that the right hand of the work is medical assistance, and we have not done anything to that end in the capitals. Here in Belém, we must inaugurate a medical clinic, and later we will have a hospital.”29 With that thought, in 1941 Bom Samaritano Clinic (Clínica Bom Samaritano) was founded, an institution that marks the beginnings of Belem Adventist Hospital (Hospital Adventista de Belém, or HAB), in Belém. In 1943 the clinic was renamed Belem Clinic (Clínica de Belém). Its organization took place due to the work that started with the medical missionary launches.30

Halliwell and leaders of the union were fully convinced that Belém would be a symbol of Adventism in the Amazon basin, with prayer and work, the establishment of a health institution in the capital of Pará was planned. In the last quarter of 1949, construction began with funds received from the 13th Sabbath Offering. After four years of work, on April 10, 1953, HAB, then called Belem Hospital (Hospital Belém), was inaugurated. Many church and civil authorities attended the event, including the secretary of public health of Pará, who recognized the importance of the launch’s ministry. With only 18 beds available at the time, the institution held promise for the church in the region. Two houses were built next to the hospital for the medical and administrative directors of HAB.31

In 1954 Halliwell left the UNB presidency. At that time there were 2,590 Adventists in the territory, distributed in 20 organized churches. There were also 70 workers, 15 schools, 19 teachers, and four launches.32 At the end of 1960, there were 4,305 members in the union territory. In that decade the union agreed with the government of Brazil to operate 23 mobile clinics on the Transamazon Highway for ten years. This opened doors for the emergence of new organizations.33 High schools were inaugurated, such as Grao-Para Adventist Academy (Instituto Adventista Grão-Pará, or IAGP), in 1961, and Adventist Agricultural-Industrial Academy (Instituto Adventista Agroindustrial, or IAAI), in 1965. Between 1960 and 1965, there was an increase of more than 130 percent in the number of Adventists in UNB, with a total of 9,975 members at the end of 1965.34

In the 1970s the membership growth remained stable. In 1970 there were 50 churches in the UNB territory and 20,256 members. The union served 44 schools, with 3,769 students. By 1975 the number of members had increased to 31,046, showing a growth of approximately 50 percent. In that same period, UNB inaugurated another 16 Adventist churches, reaching a total of 66 congregations.35 Three years later, on April 25, 1978, Manaus Adventist Clinic (Clínica Adventista de Manaus) was inaugurated, an institution considered the beginning of Manaus Adventist Hospital (Hospital Adventista de Manaus, or HAM). Also, in 1978, Agro-Industrial Adventist Trans-Amazon Academy (Instituto Adventista Transamazônico Agroindustrial, or IATAI) was created in the city of Uruará, in Pará.36 The institution is currently managed by West Para Mission (Missão Oeste do Pará, or MOPa).

In 1979, due to the establishment of mobile clinics on the Transamazon Highway, the West Amazon Mission, or MAO, now known as West Amazon Conference (Associação Amazônia Ocidental, or AAmO) was created. This institution initially served Adventists in the states of Acre and Rondônia. In 1980 UNB had 47,696 members in its territory. At that time plans were made for the construction of another educational institution.37 In 1982 West Amazon Adventist Academy (Instituto Adventista da Amazônia Ocidental, or IAAMO) was created to provide additional Adventist education in the union territory.38 Now the institution is administered by UNoB. The expansion of the Adventist Church in northern Brazil continued, and in 1985 the membership reached 87,503. By 1989 there were 120,547 members, which was nearly triple the number of members at the beginning of the decade.39

With all the growth that took place, the coming years were marked by changes in the organization of the work in the territory. In 1989 the state of Maranhão was no longer served by the MCN, but by Maranhao Mission (Missão Maranhense), now known as Maranhao Conference (Associação Maranhense), which was organized that year. In 1990, ten years after the organization of MAO, this mission became a conference, known as West Amazon Conference (Associação Amazônia Ocidental).40 On May 27, 1993, the second headquarters of the North Brazil Union Mission was inaugurated in the city of Ananindeua, Pará.41 In 1995 there was another increase in the number of members of the UNB. Reports showed that 94,000 new converts had been baptized in the past five years, reaching a total of 237,273 believers, distributed in 490 congregations. Education also set new records. In 1995 UNB served 20,026 students, in 89 Adventist educational institutions.42

During that period SAD started to reorganize the church in Brazilian territory and significant changes were made. In 1996 Northeast Brazil Union Mission (União Nordeste Brasileira, or UNeB) was organized, a border institution of UNB which received part of its territory. With the creation of UNeB, MCN came under management of this union. The work continued to advance in the UNB territory. In 1997 MBA was elevated to the category of conference, changing its name to Lower Amazon Conference (Associação Baixo Amazonas, or ABA, now ANPa) and, in 1999, MCA also changed its status, becoming known as Central Amazon Conference (Associação Central Amazonas). In 2001 ABA had its territory reorganized to create South Para Mission (Missão Sul do Pará), headquartered in Marabá. This unit became South Para Conference (Associação Sul do Pará) in 2005. A year later Amazonas Roraima Conference (Associação Amazonas Roraima, or AAmaR) was created from the reorganization of ACeAm and was headquartered in Manaus. Also, in 2006, another administrative unit was created at the UNB: South Maranhao Mission (Missão Sul Maranhense), headquartered in Imperatriz, the second largest city in Maranhão.43

These administrative moves were made to meet the demands of missionary work in the region and they achieved good results. In 2008, even after a careful adjustment in membership records, UNB had 351,376 members.44 With this large number of Adventists in the union, it became increasingly difficult to serve all the conferences in the Amazon, from the city of Belém. These challenges motivated the request for the creation of a new union in Brazil, which was presented by UNB and SAD at the 2007 General Conference Annual Council held in the city of Manila, Philippines. At this council, GC Executive Committee members approved the creation of Northwest Brazil Union Mission (União Noroeste Brasileira, or UNoB) when the UNB territory was split. The following year, 2008, another institution was created in the UNB field: South Rondonia Conference (Associação Sul de Rondônia, or ASuR), whose territory was separated from the West Amazon Conference. The latter became part of UNoB.45

After two years of intense planning, on January 1, 2010, the Northwest Brazil Union Mission began functioning at its headquarters in Manaus. This unit was created to serve the states of Amazonas, Roraima, Acre, and Rondônia, and their respective administrative units. As a result of this split, UNB served the states of Amapá, Maranhão, and Pará, which had 167,008 Adventists, distributed in 1,123 churches. This area has approximately 1,729,909 square kilometers and comprises 20.09 percent of the Brazilian national territory. Meanwhile, UNoB was responsible for the administration of the Adventist Church in the states of Acre, Amazonas, Rondônia, and Roraima, with 116,180 members and 680 churches. This area has 2,190,597 square kilometers, which is 25.44 percent of the Brazilian territory.46

In 2010 UNB took another step in the educational and theological development of its field. Amazonia Adventist College (Faculdade Adventista da Amazônia) started operation on its campus is in Benevides, Pará. The land where the college is located was owned by Belém Adventist Hospital and was donated to the union in 2002 for the construction of the college. The school was inaugurated on August 16, 2009, and classes started on February 1, 2010. The first course to be offered at FAAMA was a bachelor’s degree in theology, making the campus a regional headquarters for the SAD Latin-American Adventist Theology Seminary (SALT). The first theology class started in 2010 with 60 students.47 In addition to the theology course, the institution now offers pedagogy and basic education courses.48

In December 2013 it was voted to reorganize the Lower Amazon Conference into two fields: North Para Conference (Associação Norte do Pará) and Para-Amapa Mission (Missão Pará-Amapá).49 In 2019 the last administrative reorganization took place between the fields of the union. In that year, Maranhao Conference was reorganized and, as a result, Northeast Maranhao Mission (Missão Nordeste Maranhense, or MNeM) was created. This and the other administrative units inaugurated in the last decade are the result of the operating philosophy still upheld by UNB, known by the phrase: dividindo para multiplicar (splitting to multiply), a concept well established in Brazilian Adventism.50 Due to the many divisions that resulted in multiplication, in 2019 union membership surpassed 300,000.51

UNB continues to engage in strong evangelistic work in northern Brazil, and it does so under the motto Comunhão, Relacionamento e Missão (Communion, Relationship, and Mission, or CRM), proposed by the South American Division. This program focuses on several missionary activities designed to involve members in mission and to reach the public with the message of salvation. One of the activities that is strongly emphasized is Pequenos Grupos (Small Groups, or PGs).52 The union has developed a network of small groups: the Small Group of Pastors (Pequeno Grupo de Pastores, or PGP), Small Group of Leaders (Pequeno Grupo de Líderes, or PGL), and Small Group of members (Pequeno Grupo, or PG). The goal is for each congregation to have one small group for each 24 members. In order to develop a system to evangelize people and plant churches, UNB works through missionary pairs, Bible classes, and evangelism campaigns.53 All of these methods engage pastors, lay leaders, and volunteer members in the Church’s mission. Every year evangelistic series are held in the first semester during the Holy Week and in the second semester during the pastoral evangelism that takes place in October, according to the SAD calendar. These meetings have resulted in baptisms and new congregations in the states comprising the union.

Other activities have been led by the youth ministries, which works with projects such as One Year in Mission;54 Caleb Mission,55 Breaking the Silence,56 and North in Action Day.57 The Serviço Voluntário Adventista (Adventist Volunteer Service, or SVA) has been sending volunteers under the One Year in Mission project to countries such as Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, and Bangladesh, in addition to many locations in Brazil. The Caleb Mission had a record participation of 43,180 volunteers in 2017 and, in 2019, more than 6,000 volunteers were involved in the project that led to the establishment of ten new churches and the baptism of around 10,000 people.58 The Breaking the Silence project has involved lectures in schools and public institutions to prevent and combat social and domestic violence. The Life for Lives program involves both church members and non-members in donating blood and bone marrow. In addition to these activities, an intense work is done with children, adolescents, and young people who are also served by the Pathfinder Club,59 with a total of 1,688 clubs and 45,695 participants, and the Adventurers Club,60 with 876 clubs and 16,212 children.61

And in order for leaders and members to remain firm in faith and actively involved in these evangelization fronts, the union has paid special attention to the preparation and service of this army of missionaries. Spiritual Enrichment Seminars are organized, Christian Stewardship District Teams, with Fidelity Caravans are kept in operation, and the Worship Program is broadcast via satellite.62 The union also promotes the Manna Project,63 which obtained 37,800 subscriptions for the Sabbath School lesson booklet in 2015. Since 2010, three Ministerial Councils, three Women’s Ministry Councils, three Theology Students’ Councils, eight Pathfinders Camporees,64 and two Youth Camporees have been held, and more than 50,000 leaders have been trained for evangelism. The project Evangelizing Women Bringing Light was also created, which has the purpose of helping women engage in missionary and evangelistic activities. They represent more than 53 percent of the Adventist population in northern Brazil and are engaged in many evangelistic fronts each year.

The work carried out by New Time Radio and Hope Channel Brazil Media Center stands out as an important tool to support the evangelistic efforts made at UNB and has increasingly contributed to spreading the Adventist message in the northern region of Brazil. There is a Novo Tempo radio station broadcasting its signal from Belém, as well as programs broadcast through other stations. TV Novo Tempo operates on an open channel in the host cities of the fields and fulfills an important evangelistic role in these cities and their surroundings. In 2015, the 20th anniversary of Belem New Time Radio was celebrated, in addition to the first anniversary of Hope Channel Brazil - Belem, which is broadcast on channel 54. The commemorative event was attended by New Time Caravan and more than 40,000 people at the Mangueirão Olympic Stadium, in Belém. Also, in 2015, UNB inaugurated Pastor Aldo Duarte de Carvalho Communication Center, which is 218 square meters is size.65

Another important support front is the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, (ADRA), which carries out constant human development projects within the scope of UNB. Examples include the medical missionary launches maintained by ADRA, in partnership with HAB since its establishment. On June 25, 2016, the Light Bearer XXIX was inaugurated in Belém, under the responsibility of ADRA.66 In addition to the health care services offered in partnership with HAB to riverside communities in Pará, ADRA also participates in activities throughout the state. One of those initiatives is the Goal of Hope project, in which sports are used as a means of socializing, interacting with, and educating children who are in a situation of social vulnerability. There is also the project Support to Teenage Mothers, carried out in cooperation with the Brazilian Ministry of Labor and supported by the UNB fields, in providing assistance to young mothers. A similar program is the Writing and Rewriting Our History Project, which assists juvenile offenders in resocialization, education, and professional training.67

All the projects and activities mentioned work in a system known as “integrated evangelism.” Although each initiative has its specific spectrum of missionary activity, they all combine to provide a greater impact, as in the case of the Hope Impact project.68 Through this initiative, from 2011 to 2019, more than seven million volumes of Adventist literature were delivered in Pará, Amapá, and Maranhão, with the massive participation of members through a wide variety of missionary activities.69

Although missionary intensity is an evident feature throughout UNB’s historical journey, there have been many difficulties along the way. From the very beginning, Adventist pioneers in the territory spared no efforts and made every sacrifice necessary to assure the progress of the Adventist mission, despite the challenges. They worked with determination despite the long distances, scorching sun, floods, inhospitable environments, cultural differences, lack of transport, tropical diseases, religious hostilities, and other factors which endangered their lives. They left a legacy of love for the Word of God, zeal for the Adventist message, and appreciation for the lives to be reached by the eternal gospel—attitudes that were witnessed in the midst of all the obstacles they faced and that serve as an inspiration and example for the progress of the work today. Following the steps of these pioneers, Adventist leaders and members in this region have learned to walk steadily, even amidst challenges.70

One of the biggest challenges existing in this region is the great number of low-income families. As a result, UNB faces difficulties in carrying out projects that require greater financial investments. The Church is growing rapidly in this region, but the lack of resources hinders new construction work. There is also a challenge related to the infrastructure of the churches. Many of the buildings were constructed in a time when buildings were made without much structure, serving only to demarcate a territory. This means that there is a need to upgrade many of these old properties in order to adapt them to the standards of safety, convenience, and accessibility that currently apply. Another challenging factor is the distance between pastoral districts and the size of these districts. The average is 11 congregations per pastor, which makes it extremely difficult to offer services to all the members.71

Despite such challenges, UNB leadership plans to continue growth of the union. The motto of the work for the coming years is União Norte, União Forte (North Union, Strong Union), based on communion, relationship, and mission. In order to encourage the communion of its members, the union plans for the next five years to see 100,000 worshipers participating in a well-established discipleship process, which includes the participation of members in the faithful and systematic return of tithes and offerings. These members will be encouraged to develop and maintain the habit of spending the first hour of the day in contact with God through study of the Bible, Sabbath School lesson, and Spirit of Prophecy. In the relationship area, the purpose of the union is to keep 15,000 small discipleship groups meeting every week, creating permanent opportunities for participants to study the Word, relate to others, and maintain a missionary focus. Regarding the Church’s mission, the plan is to expand participation on all fronts of action that have been maintained by the denomination.72

In addition to the goals mentioned, in structural terms UNB plans to fully revitalize HAB. In the educational area, the institution is seeking to implement another higher education course on the FAAMA campus and to establish three more school units in the coming years. The field leadership intends to plant new congregations and revitalize the headquarters of all pastoral districts. All efforts will continue to be made so that each Adventist in northern Brazil carries forward the flame of the gospel.73

Chronology of Administrative Leaders74

Presidents: Leo Blair Halliwell (1936-1954); Walter J. Streithorst (1955-1968); João Wolff (1969-1976); Alberto Ribeiro de Souza (1977-1983); Carlos Magalhães Borda (1984-1985); Wandyr Mendes de Oliveira (1985-1992); Adamôr Lopes Pimenta (1993-1998); Izeas dos Santos Cardoso (1999-2005); Marlinton Souza Lopes (2006-2009); Leonino Barbosa Santiago (2010-present).

Secretaries: J. Wissner (1936); Jorge P. Lobo (1937-1942); B. W. Steinweg (1942-1947); B. C. Kalbermatter (1947-1948); R. G. Dutre (1948-1949); S. C. Crawford (1950-1951); L. M. Harder (1951-1954); B. C. Kalbermatter (1955-1957); Oséas F. de Moura (1957); H. E. Walker (1957); Walkírio Souza Lima (1957); Alvino Lessa (1957); Alger J. Jones (1957-1958); H. E. Walker (1958-1959); Wilson S. Avila (1960-1963); Erich W. Olm (1964-1966); Geraldo Bökenkamp (1967-1969); Ruy Nagel (1970-1971); Horácio Targas (1972-1973); Milton M. Gressler (1974); Lauro M. Grellmann (1974-1978); Alair O. de Freitas (1979-1980); Vilfredo Doerner (1981); Eugenio Rodrigues (1982-1988); Adamor Lopes Pimenta (1989-1991); Antônio Moisés de Almeida (1992-1995); Izéas dos Santos Cardoso (1996-1997); José Clodoaldo Barbosa (1998-2010); Moisés Moacir da Silva (2010-2011); André Henrique de Souza Dantas (2011-2016); Ozeias de Souza Costa (2016-present).

Treasurers: J. Wissner (1936); Jorge P. Lobo (1937-1942); B. W. Steinweg (1942-1947); B. C. Kalbermatter (1947-1948); R. G. Dutre (1948-1949); S. C. Crawford (1950-1951); L. M. Harder (1951-1954); B. C. Kalbermatter (1955-1957); Alger J. Jones (1958); H. E. Walker (1959); Wilson S. Avila (1960-1963); Erich W. Olm (1964-1966); Geraldo Bökenkamp (1967-1969); Ruy Nagel (1970-1971); Horácio Targas (1972-1973); Milton M. Gressler (1974); Lauro M. Grellmann (1974-1978); Alair O. de Freitas (1979-1980); Vilfredo Doerner (1981-1987); Josias Fragoso (1988-1992); Jarci Lourenço Reis (1993-2000); Volnei da Rosa Porto (2001-2010); Clairton de Oliveira (2010-2017); Flávio André Nunes dos Santos (2017-2019); Rogério José de Sousa (2019-present).75

Sources

Amapá. 2019 Brazil Census. Estimated population. IBGE accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2D8DUbG;

Amorim, Gerllany. “Igreja Adventista no Norte elege líderes para os próximos cinco anos” [Adventist Church in the North elects leaders for the next five years]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), November 28, 2019.

Amorim, Gerllany. “Igreja Adventista no Norte tem novo diretor financeiro” [Adventist Church in the North has new chief financial officer]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), November 10, 2019.

Araújo, Gerson P. de. “A Menina do Grão-Pará” [The Girl from Grão-Pará]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 59 (February 1964).

Barreto, Glória. “Programa Adorai” [Worship Program]. Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 1 (January-March 2015).

Batista, Eduardo. “Juventude estampada” [Featured Youth]. Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 1 (January-March 2015).

Bernardo, Pedro. “Espalhando Livros na Amazônia” [Spreading Books in the Amazon]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review], no. 10, year 26 (October 1931).

Borba, Wilson. “A Base Missionária Adventista do Sétimo Dia Brasileira: Sua Formação, Consolidação e Expansão” [The Brazilian Seventh-day Adventist mission basis: its formation, consolidation and expansion]. Doctoral thesis, Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary, 2009.

Brown, John L. “A Coisa Vae” [The thing goes]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 8 (August 1927).

Brown, John L. “Missão Baixo Amazonas” [Lower Amazonas Mission]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 8 (August 1927).

Casale, Orlando. “Colportando na Transamazônica” [Canvassing in the Transamazon]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 68 (July 1973).

Caranha, Josiane (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary). E-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019.

Faculdade Adventista da Amazônia [Amazônia Adventist College]. http://www.faama.edu.br/.

Greenleaf, Floyd. Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: The Growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011.

Halliwell, Leo Blair. “Experiências de André Gedrath no Ceará” [André Gedrath’s experiences in Ceará]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 26, no. 6 (June 1931).

Haynes, Carlyle B. “Oportunidade Extraordinária para Colportores Brasileiros” [Extraordinary Opportunity for Brazilian Canvassers]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 11 (November 1927).

Johnson, J. B. “Abrindo Novos Territórios no Norte” [Opening New Territories in the North]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 9 (September 1927).

Kümpel, Manoel. “Bahia.” Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 9, no. 11 (November 1914).

Lessa, Rubens. Construtores de Esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016.

Lundquist, H. B. “Progressos na Divisão Sul-Americana” [Progress in the South American Division]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 32, no. 2 (February 1937).

Maranhão. 2019 Brazil Census. Estimated population. IBGE, accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2EhbXiK.

Mayr, Hans. El Abuelito Hans [Grandpa Hans]. Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2004.

Meireles, Pâmela, “Dia do Norte em Ação movimenta o Oeste do Pará” [North in Action Day moves western Pará]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), July 6, 2015.

Meyers, E. H. “Notas de Colportagem” [Canvassing Notes]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 11 (November 1927).

Ministério dos Desbravadores e Aventureiros [Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministries]. https://clubes.adventistas.org/br/.

Minutes of Maranhão Conference, May 2018, vote no. 2018-059.

Minutes of the North Brazil Union Mission, vote no. 53-43, p. 434.

Minutes of the North Brazil Union Mission, vote no. 53-44, p. 434.

Minutes of the North Brazil Union Mission, vote no. 97-1938.

Minutes of the South American Division, December 8, 1936, vote no. 36-4581.

Minutes of the South American Division, vote no. 4644, p. 1300.

Minutes of the South American Division, vote no. 4682, p. 1312.

Mota, Franciele. “Saúde para Todos” [Health for All]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1265, year 108 (October 2013).

Novo Tempo [Adventist Media center - Brazil]. https://www.novotempo.com/.

Pará. 2019 Brazil Census. Estimated population. IBGE accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hKZbHR.

“Relatório de colportagem” [Canvassing report]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 6, June 1928.

“Relatório de colportagem” [Canvassing report]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 7, July 1928.

Selles, Lene. “Rumo ao desafio” [Towards the challenge]. Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 1 (April-June 2014).

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, various years.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, various years.

Storch, Gustavo S., Venturas e Aventuras de um Pioneiro [Ventures and Adventures of a Pioneer]. Santo André, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 1982.

Streithorst, Olga. Leo Halliwell na Amazônia [Leo Halliwell in the Amazon]. Santo André, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 1979.

Streithorst, Walter. Minha Vida na Amazônia [My life in the Amazon]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1993.

Wilcox, E. H. “A colportagem na União Este Brasileira” [Canvassing work in East Brazil Union Conference]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 11 (November 1928).

Williams, W. H. “South America a Home Base.” ARH, January 8, 1925.

Notes

  1. 2019 Brazil Census, Maranhão, geographic level Maranhão - 21, estimated population, IBGE, accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2EhbXiK; 2019 Brazil Census, Pará, geographic level Pará - 15, estimated population, IBGE, accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hKZbHR; 2019 Brazil Census, Amapá, geographic level Amapá - 16, estimated population, IBGE, accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2D8DUbG; Gerllany Amorim, “Igreja Adventista no Norte elege líderes para os próximos cinco anos” [Adventist Church in the North elects leaders for the next five years], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], November 28, 2019, accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2CKipyh.

  2. “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 244-246.

  3. Novo Tempo [Hope Channel Brazil], “Onde assistir” [Where to watch], accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WRkq2q; Novo Tempo [New Time Radio], “Onde ouvir” [Where to listen], accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hzfW8F.

  4. Josiane Caranha (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019.

  5. Ibid.

  6. Wilson Borba, “A Base Missionária Adventista do Sétimo Dia Brasileira: Sua Formação, Consolidação e Expansão” [The Brazilian Seventh-day Adventist mission basis: its formation, consolidation and expansion] (Doctoral thesis, Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary, 2009).

  7. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 85, 291.

  8. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 28.

  9. W.H. Williams, “South America a Home Base,” ARH, January 8, 1925, 14;

    Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 28-29; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America], (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 351.

  10. Manoel Kümpel, “Bahia,” Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 9, no. 11 (November 1914): 6-7.

  11. J. L. Brown, “Missão Baixo Amazonas” [Lower Amazonas Mission], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 8 (August 1927): 11.

  12. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 31.

  13. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 291, 292, 352; John L. Brown, “A Coisa Vae” [The thing goes], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 8 (August 1927): 10-11; John L. Brown, “Missão Baixo Amazonas” [Lower Amazonas Mission], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 8 (August 1927): 11; J. B. Johnson, “Abrindo Novos Territórios no Norte” [Opening New Territories in the North], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 9 (September 1927): 6; “Relatório de colportagem” [Canvassing report], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 7, July 1928, 14; “Relatório de colportagem” [Canvassing report], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 6, June 1928, 14.

  14. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 80.

  15. Ibid., 90.

  16. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 44-48; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 353; E. H. Meyers, “Notas de Colportagem” [Canvassing Notes], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 11 (November 1927): 14; Carlyle B. Haynes, “Oportunidade Extraordinária para Colportores Brasileiros” [Extraordinary Opportunity for Brazilian Canvassers], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 22, no. 11 (November 1927): 14-15; E. H. Wilcox, “A colportagem na União Este Brasileira” [Canvassing work in East Brazil Union Conference], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 11 (November 1928): 12; Leo Blair Halliwell, “Experiências de André Gedrath no Ceará” [André Gedrath’s experiences in Ceará], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 26, no. 6 (June 1931): 4; Pedro Bernardo, “Espalhando Livros na Amazônia” [Spreading Books in the Amazon], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review], no. 10, year 26 (October 1931): 13; Hans Mayr, El Abuelito Hans [Grandpa Hans] (Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2004), 114-118.

  17. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 292, 353; Olga Streithorst, Leo Halliwell na Amazônia [Leo Halliwell in the Amazon] (Santo André, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1979), 44.

  18. Franciele Mota, “Saúde para Todos” [Health for All], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1265, year 108 (October 2013): 28.

  19. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 98.

  20. H. B. Lundquist, “Progressos na Divisão Sul-Americana” [Progress in the South American Division], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 32, no. 2 (February 1937): 1, 15.

  21. Minutes of the South American Division, December 8, 1936, vote no. 36-4581.

  22. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 21; “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1937), 180.

  23. “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1940), 189.

  24. Minutes of the South American Division, vote no. 4682, p. 1312; Minutes of the South American Division, vote no. 4644, p. 1300.

  25. Minutes of the North Brazil Union Mission, vote no. 97-1938; Walter Streithorst, Minha Vida na Amazônia [My life in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1993), 33; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 2011), 437; Lene Selles, “Rumo ao desafio” [Towards the challenge], Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 1 (April-June 2014): 21.

  26. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 437.

  27. Gustavo S. Storch, Venturas e Aventuras de um Pioneiro [Ventures and Adventures of a Pioneer] (Santo André, SP: Brazilian Publishing House), 1982.

  28. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 56, 107.

  29. Ibid., 126.

  30. Franciele Mota, “Saúde para Todos” [Health for All], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1265, year 108 (October 2013): 28.

  31. Ibid., 126-127.

  32. Ibid., 135.

  33. Walter Streithorst, Minha Vida na Amazônia [My life in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1993).

  34. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 138-139.

  35. Ibid.

  36. Ibid., 111, 131.

  37. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 138-139; “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1981), 276.

  38. Walter Streithorst, Minha Vida na Amazônia [My life in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1993), 77-83; Gerson P. de Araújo, “A Menina do Grão-Pará” [The Girl from Grão-Pará], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 59 (February 1964): 16-17; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 558; Orlando Casale, “Colportando na Transamazônica” [Canvassing in the Transamazon], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 68 (July 1973): 19.

  39. “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1986), 283; “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1990), 276.

  40. “General Statistics by Divisions for 1991: South American Division,” Annual Statistic Report (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1991), 20.

  41. Minutes of the North Brazil Union Mission, votes no. 53-43 and 53-44, p. 434.

  42. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 138-139.

  43. Ibid., 158.

  44. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 679-670; Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Brazil Union Mission,” accessed on June 23, 2016, https://bit.ly/2s4HiiJ.

  45. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 158.

  46. “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 288, 298; Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 161.

  47. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 184-185.

  48. Faculdade Adventista da Amazônia [Amazônia Adventist College], “Home,” accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZUsmSs.

  49. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016), 156.

  50. Minutes of Maranhão Conference, May 2018, vote no. 2018-059.

  51. Josiane Caranha (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019.

  52. “Small Group is a weekly gathering of people who, under the coordination of a leader, seek spiritual, relational and evangelistic growth.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Pequenos Grupos” [Small Groups], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NtcXj7

  53. Lene Selles, “Rumo ao desafio” [Towards the challenge], Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 1 (April-June 2014): 22, 24.

  54. “The project Um Ano em Missão [One Year in Mission - OYiM] promotes the participation of young Adventists in the missionary projects that evangelize urban centers in eight countries in South America, and uniting their talents, resources and professional knowledge with the needs of the community.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Um Ano Em Missão” [One Year in Mission], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2sCFyNL

  55. The Missão Calebe [Caleb Mission] project is a volunteer program that provides social service to people in need as a way of witnessing. The Adventist youth is invited to dedicate their vacation time to evangelism in places where there is no Adventist presence, to strengthen the small congregations and gain new people for the kingdom of God. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Missão Calebe 2020” [Caleb Mission 2020], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi.

  56. “Quebrando o Silêncio [Breaking the Silence] is an annual project since 2002 by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in eight South American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay), which aims to educate people about how to prevent domestic abuse and violence. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Quebrando o Silêncio” [Breaking the Silence], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WoDfIW.

  57. This project involves young people from the states of Pará, Amapá and Maranhão in evangelistic work. On the first Saturday of each month, they perform different types of actions on the streets to announce Jesus' return. Pâmela Meireles, “Dia do Norte em Ação movimenta o Oeste do Pará” [North in Action Day moves western Pará] Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 6, 2015, accessed on August 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/3gwaxPp; Eduardo Batista, “Juventude estampada” [Featured Youth], Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 1 (January-March 2015): 22-26.

  58. Josiane Caranha (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019.

  59. The Pathfinders Club is designed for boys and girls aged 10 to 15, regardless of their social classes, race, and religion. They meet usually once a week to learn new skills and develop their talents and appreciation for nature. The Club organizes outdoor activities like camping, hiking, climbing, and exploring the woods and caves. The children are taught how to cook outdoors and make fire without matches. They are taught to fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Quem somos” [Who we are], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh.

  60. The Adventurers Club is a program for children from 6 to 9. The Club’s activities focus on the physical, mental, and spiritual development of children. Seventh-Day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Aventureiros” [Adventurers], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NyYUuw.

  61. Ministério de Desbravadores e Aventureiros [Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministries], “Estatísticas - União Norte Brasileira” [Statistics - North Brazil Union Mission], accessed on July 29, 2020, https://bit.ly/39qENIR.

  62. Glória Barreto, “Programa Adorai” [Worship Program], Mais Destaque Norte [Highlights from the North], year 01 (January-March 2015): 38.

  63. The Manna project encourages people of all ages to study the Sabbath School Study Guide and motivates them to study the Word of God daily. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Projeto Maná” [Manna project], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2XXpYGu

  64. “Camporee is a large camp that gathers youth and children who participate in the various clubs led by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Campori de Desbravadores da DSA” [SAD Pathfinders Camporee], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2uwY377.

  65. Josiane Caranha (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019.

  66. Ibid.

  67. Ibid.

  68. The project “Hope Impact is a program that encourages the practice of reading and provides a mass annual distribution of books on the part of the Seventh-day Adventist in the South American territory.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO

  69. Josiane Caranha (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019.

  70. Ibid.

  71. Ibid.

  72. Ibid.

  73. Ibid.

  74. “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1937), 180; “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 244-246; Gerllany Amorim, “Igreja Adventista no Norte tem novo diretor financeiro” [Adventist Church in the North has new chief financial officer], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], November 10, 2019, accessed on July 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2BwpLF2; Josiane Caranha (Assistant of the UNB executive secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 15, 2019. See also the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks from 1937 to 2019.

  75. For more information about the North Brazil Union Mission, access the website http://unb.adventistas.org/, and the social media Facebook – Adventistas Norte; Instagram – @adventistasnorte; Twitter – @adventistanorte; and YouTube – Adventistas Norte.

×

Plenc, Daniel Oscar, Josafá da Silva Oliveira. "North Brazil Union Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 30, 2021. Accessed June 18, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AGQR.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar, Josafá da Silva Oliveira. "North Brazil Union Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 30, 2021. Date of access June 18, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AGQR.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar, Josafá da Silva Oliveira (2021, July 30). North Brazil Union Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 18, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AGQR.